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 Posted:   Sep 16, 2015 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   fleming   (Member)

Lalo Schifrin's "Pussycat Pussycat I Love You" (1970) was set for LP release by United Artists and then cancelled after the movie flopped. I even remember listening to the theme on the radio, which means promo copies were issued. FSM finally made it available.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2015 - 5:40 PM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

More Music from "SPARTACUS" (Alex North)
More Music from "THUNDERBALL" (John Barry)

All of the tracks from the above were subsequently released in stereo on CD, by Varese and EMI respectively.

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2015 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

I believe Waxman's THE STORY OF RUTH had a planned and canned LP release.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2015 - 7:30 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)


stry of ruth was planned. early trade ads for both summer Place and the Best of Everything mention soundtrack albums.

the pressbook of Peyton Place mentions a two lp set with opening narration by Diane Varsi.
A one lp was released.

Since MGM had its own lp division, why did the soundtrack to Raintree County go to RCA?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2015 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

stry of ruth was planned. early trade ads for both summer Place and the Best of Everything mention soundtrack albums.

the pressbook of Peyton Place mentions a two lp set with opening narration by Diane Varsi.
A one lp was released.

Since MGM had its own lp division, why did the soundtrack to Raintree County go to RCA?


One reason was that Nat King Cole's vocal in the main title was not used, since he was under contract to Capitol (how come the L.P. wasn't released on Capitol?)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2015 - 11:03 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

MGM had its LP division, why did the soundtrack to Raintree County go to RCA?


That's a good question, which I hadn't thought about before. Certainly, up until 1957, most of the MGM Records releases had been of the company's musicals. There had been some dramatic score releases, such as MADAME BOVARY, IVANHOE, PLYMOUTH ADVENTURE, and QUO VADIS, a few of which went back to the days of 78s. And there had been a few mainly spoken word albums (JULIUS CAESAR, a second QUO VADIS release). But certainly there weren't the quantity and variety of dramatic score releases that we saw from MGM in the post-BEN-HUR 1960s.

Perhaps MGM Records was unsure of its ability to market a big dramatic score release. Or possibly, since the release was of the original soundtracks and not a re-recording, they did not want to pay the huge re-use fees that would be required for such a release, particularly of a two disc set. With RAINTREE COUNTY scheduled for an October 1957 release, MGM had just issued its financial statements for the fiscal year ending 31 August 1957. They showed that, for the first time in its history, MGM had suffered a loss, of $455,000, as opposed to a profit of $5 million the year prior. Perhaps MGM decided that it was more financially prudent to license out the LP to RCA and let a company with deeper pockets pony up the re-use fees and take the risk of the album's potential failure.

While RAINTREE COUNTY the film made a small profit for MGM on its $6 million production cost, we don't know how well RAINTREE COUNTY the album did for RCA. What we do know is that for its next super-production, BEN-HUR, MGM planned from the outset to issue a re-recorded score rather than an original soundtrack.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2015 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   scottthompson   (Member)

Goldsmith put together a RIO LOBO LP, but I'm not sure of a set planned release that was canned.

SCOTT

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2015 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   JEC   (Member)

Other than THE CAINE MUTINY, anything printed then pulled?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2015 - 3:41 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

. . . anything printed then pulled?


Varese's BLOOD IN, BLOOD OUT, by Conti.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2015 - 5:41 PM   
 By:   Steve H   (Member)

I was always curious if their was ever a soundtrack planned for Die Hard. It was a huge success for Fox at the time pushed along on a wave of popularity for Bruce Willis. There was a wonderful 35-40 mins of score from Michael Kamen though I'd imagine the Beethoven piece would have been included. On the commercial side there were tracks from Run DMC, Stevie Wonder, and the Vaughan Monroe standard Let It Snow. In hindsight this one seemed like a no brainer.

 
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