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 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 1:33 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

As an Englishman I can understand the poetry of the game ... and I view it as a battle of wills in addition to skills between the two teams. However, I've never been a fan (I think I watched two one-day limited over Sunday matches as a kid) and as a player ... truly awful. frown

I recall TG's joke from many years ago ... I've a recollection of Andy Williams reciting it on TV - probably the Michael Parkinson show, back in the 1970s. Incidentally, MP is a great cricket fan, etc.

But reading through the comments above, I do have to quibble with one statement: If he chooses to run, then he and his at-bat partner run the length of the crease (just over 20 yards) and back again - if he successfully makes it back before the ball comes back, he has scored one "run".

One run is scored when the batsman successfully runs one length only. If he successfully runs back to his starting position then he will have scored two runs. His fellow batsman must complete the one, or two, runs, too without being run-out. Of course they can carry on running if they feel that the fielding side are too slow in recovering the ball or, as can happen, in seeking to hit the wicket so as to run-out one of the players, the fielder misses and the ball has to be collected a second time.

In the case of an odd number of runs then the batsman who was not batting will become the batsman who bats.

And at the end of each over (normally 6 balls) the bowler will deliver from the other end, thus the batsman will change, too ... unless the last delivery of the over resulted in an odd number of runs.

Compared with American Football it's crystal clear ... smile

Mitch

Edit: I haven't read it but the attached appears to be a brief (!) synopsis of the rules ... smile
http://static.espncricinfo.com/db/ABOUT_CRICKET/EXPLANATION/CRICKET_EXPLAINED_AMERICAN.html

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Why are there two sets of stumps?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 6:15 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Why are there two sets of stumps?


You're right Jehanum, I forgot about those.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

At the risk of sounding un-American -watching a full professional baseball game, especially in person, is one of the dullest, seemingly never ending - mind numbing experiences I have ever endured. I never realized how little actual action there is until I saw one in person. If cricket is slower and duller than baseball I will certainly never see a game.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

At the risk of sounding un-American -watching a full professional baseball game, especially in person, is one of the dullest, seemingly never ending - mind numbing experiences I have ever endured. I never realized how little actual action there is until I saw one in person. If cricket is slower and duller than baseball I will certainly never see a game.


If you say you find watching a Basketball Game (especially in person), 'dull and never-ending', why put yourself through it even more than once, in person or on t.v? I'm asking about Cricket here, and I don't find it boring or dull, which is why I want to know more about it as I look forward to watching more matches this Summer here - live-and-in-person. And no - I will not ask my fellow Montanan's about 'The Tea Break'. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   gone   (Member)

At the risk of sounding un-American -watching a full professional baseball game, especially in person, is one of the dullest, seemingly never ending - mind numbing experiences I have ever endured. I never realized how little actual action there is until I saw one in person. If cricket is slower and duller than baseball I will certainly never see a game.


If you say you find watching a Basketball Game (especially in person), 'dull and never-ending', why put yourself through it even more than once, in person or on t.v? I'm asking about Cricket here, and I don't find it boring or dull, which is why I want to know more about it as I look forward to watching more matches this Summer here - live-and-in-person. And no - I will not ask my fellow Montanan's about 'The Tea Break'. wink


Part of watching a major league baseball game in person is being in the stadium, taking in the scene. Also, if you have played the game then you understand the nuances and the skill required.

Outside San Diego stadium before a game they put up a pitching net with a radar gun to measure how fast the fans could throw a baseball. This had nothing to do with accuracy, just reaching back for every thing you had and throwing as hard as you could. I think one guy made it into the mid 60 mph. When you compare that to a fast ball pitcher clocking in a 90+ mph and putting the ball over the heart of the plate... it puts it into perspective.

They say that hitting a major league fast ball is one of the hardest challenges in sports, and I tend to believe them. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 10:16 AM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

Why are there two sets of stumps?

Because there are two batters out on the field at any given time, and the bowler pictches to the other set of stumps every other over. Each "over" consists of six pitches, where the bowler will bowl at one of the two batsmen, and the other one does not recieve any balls, he's just a runner (unless a single run is scored, which results in the two batsmen switching positions). Let's say, for example, that for the first over the bowler is bowling from the east side of the field to batman #1. In the second over, he switches sides and bowls from the west side of the field, to batsman #2 - this is so that both batsmen get a chance to hit, and also to make things like weather/position of the sun, fairer.

They have the second set of stumps there so that they know where they have to run between, and (I guess) so they don't have to keep moving the stumps around at the end of each over.

You can't see the second batsman on the photo above - he's probably just out of camera shot, standing to the right of the umpire (the guy in the wide-brimmed hat behind #12)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Why are there two sets of stumps?


In addition to Jon's comments, it also saves excessive wear of the crease at one end - and allows the spectators to see the games from both perspectives.

Dave - I hope your headache's receded! As for these constant comparisons with baseball, I think that's inaccurate. Surely rounders or softball would be the nearest equivalents to baseball. There are similar elements, such as the hard ball, although only the wicketkeeper amongst the fielding side wears gloves. I can attest to the nerve required to stand close in to the wicket as a fielder, preferring short mid on (or off) positions to being way out in the field.

By the way, the fastest recorded bowling speed is just over 100 mph. I don't think I've faced anything much above half that but it still takes a huge effort to raise the bat and smack the ball in the time allowed over 22 yards.

Mitch refers to the poetry of the game, which is absolutely right. I never played to any great level, but it's a game that gives you both frantic action and long spells of contemplation. As much as I love association football, when it comes to actually playing something, give me a long summer's evening and 20 overs-a-side cricket any day.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 11:59 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Why are there two sets of stumps?


In addition to Jon's comments, it also saves excessive wear of the crease at one end - and allows the spectators to see the games from both perspectives.

Dave - I hope your headache's receded! As for these constant comparisons with baseball, I think that's inaccurate. Surely rounders or softball would be the nearest equivalents to baseball. There are similar elements, such as the hard ball, although only the wicketkeeper amongst the fielding side wears gloves. I can attest to the nerve required to stand close in to the wicket as a fielder, preferring short mid on (or off) positions to being way out in the field.

By the way, the fastest recorded bowling speed is just over 100 mph. I don't think I've faced anything much above half that but it still takes a huge effort to raise the bat and smack the ball in the time allowed over 22 yards.

Mitch refers to the poetry of the game, which is absolutely right. I never played to any great level, but it's a game that gives you both frantic action and long spells of contemplation. As much as I love association football, when it comes to actually playing something, give me a long summer's evening and 20 overs-a-side cricket any day.



Chris, when you've found yourself at the losing-end of a heated argument with Becca at your home, what was the fastest recorded speed of her bowling a tea-cup or a book at you? wink

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 6:07 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO GONE- I agree with that statement there is nothing harder then hitting a major league baseball pitch. when you think about the other sports that are popular football, basketball hockey etc, I agree, Now from my own first hand experience playing hardball many times in my life. Imagine on a cold night what it's like hitting a over 90 mile fastball at you in which you hit it off the end of the bat, a sting from hell. On that subject, poor TONY CORIGILORO[SPELLING] GETTING HIT SMACK IN THE FACE WITH ONE OF THOSE PITCHERS.

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2014 - 8:14 PM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)



By the way, the fastest recorded bowling speed is just over 100 mph. I don't think I've faced anything much above half that but it still takes a huge effort to raise the bat and smack the ball in the time allowed over 22 yards.


Being grown up in Pakistan- Cricket is one of the most played and cheered game here. When Pakistan or India come to play- its like a war frenzy. The fastest bowling record is by no means our very own ace Shoaib Akhtar. He maintains the record Bowling Speed: 161.3 kmph.

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2014 - 7:11 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

There are a couple of obscure extra rules.

If a fielder catches the ball with an item of his clothing, like a cap, or his sweater stretched out, it doesn't count and the other team are awarded three runs.

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2014 - 7:20 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

By the way, the fastest recorded bowling speed is just over 100 mph. I don't think I've faced anything much above half that but it still takes a huge effort to raise the bat and smack the ball in the time allowed over 22 yards.



Many folk unfamiliar with the game don't realise the hardness of that ball. Boiled leather sewn over hard-packed corkwood. It's solid, and dangerous.

I recall once when I was a kid in primary school, we ran out of balls, and some chap went home for lunch and came back with some billiard balls! After one game, I threw one in the air, and saw with horror that it was falling towards another kid's head. I shouted, he turned round, it hit his mouth and knocked out two front teeth. I felt TERRIBLE. Fortunately, they were only milk teeth. He never held it against me. Oddly enough, neither did the teacher, when I walked up to declare myself a criminal. Tougher days.

 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2014 - 7:27 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Last Summer, I was witness to a game of Cricket here in The Bitterroot Valley of Montana. I really could not understand the rules and I only think I grasped what I was watching. There will be another series of games this Summer not far from my home and I'm sure I'll stop and watch again. (Probably the biggest surprise was that Cricket was even being played in Montana, I suppose.) But, can the game be explained to us Americans from (presumably) one of our members from The U.K. or India? Thanks.




Montana, if this doesn't amuse you, it's one for Dave:

It involves Brian Johnston, the English cricket commentator: this is from his Wiki page:

"Johnston was renowned for his on-air schoolboy humour and puns. In one famous incident during a Test match at the Oval, Jonathan Agnew suggested that Ian Botham was out hit wicket because he had failed to "get his leg over" (a British slang term meaning to have sex). Johnston carried on commentating (and giggling) for 30 seconds before dissolving into helpless laughter.[9] [1]

Among his other gaffes were: "There's Neil Harvey standing at leg slip with his legs wide apart, waiting for a tickle", which he uttered when Harvey was representing Australia at the Headingley Test in 1961.[10]

The oft-cited quote: "The bowler's Holding, the batsman's Willey" occurred when Michael Holding of the West Indies was bowling to Peter Willey of England in a Test match at The Oval in 1976. Johnston claimed not to have noticed saying anything odd during the match, and that he was only alerted to his gaffe by a letter from "a lady" named "Miss Mainpiece".[10][11] According to Christopher Martin-Jenkins,[12] the cricinfo biography,[13] and the biography by Johnston's son Barry,[14] Johnston never actually made the remark. Barry Johnston says "It was too good a pun to resist...but Brian never actually said that he had spoken the words on air." This is contradicted by Henry Blofeld who claims to have been present at the time....
"

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2014 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

Being grown up in Pakistan- Cricket is one of the most played and cheered game here. When Pakistan or India come to play- its like a war frenzy. The fastest bowling record is by no means our very own ace Shoaib Akhtar. He maintains the record Bowling Speed: 161.3 kmph.

I'd never noticed before just how huge Akhtar's right bicep is! No wonder he can bowl so powerfully...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 6, 2014 - 10:05 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I was talking about BASE ball being boring, BASKET ball is not nearly as boring.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2014 - 2:06 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Chris, when you've found yourself at the losing-end of a heated argument with Becca at your home, what was the fastest recorded speed of her bowling a tea-cup or a book at you? wink


Dave, we have a simple formula for avoiding such issues. Whenever we agree on something, I get my way. Whenever we disagree, Becca gets hers. That seems fair.

On topic, one of the oldest rivalries in cricket is Yorkshire v Lancashire - the Roses match. The two teams played each other last night in a 20 overs a side game. The clip below is one of the reasons that I love cricket... (Yorkshire won, with a touch of controversy as Lancashire were docked six runs for playing too slowly)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2014 - 3:18 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

And let's not forget about the cricket ball, it's bloody hard, & if it hits you, you really know it...& no one wears a huge thick leather glove to catch it!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2014 - 5:51 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

What makes baseball in some ways more interesting is the fact the game is never over, because there is no time clock, that makes it more interesting. Plus when one team scores in basketball and football, the other time gets the ball. In baseball a team can continue to score and score. Plus baseball has more suspense and with more personality. It is only boring to people who don't want to think, because in fast moving games you can enjoy it without thinking much. But to each one's own.

 
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