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 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 9:22 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

I am due to have surgery sometime in the very near future. During my hospital and recovery times which could be lengthy, I will need to put my 8 year old Dog in a kennel. He's never been in a kennel in his life, and I am very concerned about his well-being while we're separated. I have visited a few kennels in the area and have pretty much settled upon one. My Dog's Vet gave him a shot for 'Kennel-Cough', (whatever that is). Apparantly it's required to board a dog and it's for the safety of the dog. Please, if you've ever boarded your dog before, are there any 'things' I should ask the kennel's staff before I take my dog there? Here is a video that the kennel in question has made available to prospective clients. If YOU have boarded a dog before, does this look ok? I've visited this place and it does indeed look exactly as described, except I didn't see any dogs laying in beds!

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 9:37 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

It looks pretty standard. Probably the best thing you can do is look to Yelp, etc, for customer testimonials. Ultimately what it comes down to in this case is not the facilities but how well the staff keep on top of spot-cleaning messes, thoroughly cleaning on a daily basis, overseeing situations where dogs who don't know each other are introduced, that kind of thing.

As for the stay itself, it will of course be stressful for your dog. You might want to consider sleeping which a blanket (or stuffed animal) that your dog would like for a week or so prior to the stay so it gets to smelling like you. Ask them to put it in his kennel with him so that he has something that smells of you/home to cuddle with. Also make sure to leave plenty of his food with the kennel along with feeding instructions, as it can be stressful for some dogs to have to switch diets.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Make sure all your dog's vaccinations are up-to-date. Also, check to make sure the dog's personal area is large enough. I agree with the previous poster that it's helpful to take toys etc. that smells like you and/or your house.

One thing for your benefit would be for the kennel to send you "doggy pics" from time to time so you can see how he's doing. One facility here in Houston has several "doggy cams" that allow clients to log in to a website and see their pet in real time!

Best wishes to you for a successful operation and speedy recovery!

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

If at all possible have a friend, relative or co-worker (you trust) watch your dog. I have no inside information on kennels but you know the promotional videos are going to put them in the best of light.
Good luck with your surgery and recovery.

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Please, if you've ever boarded your dog before, are there any 'things' I should ask the kennel's staff before I take my dog there?

Hi, Dave.

Have you considered dog daycare, rather than boarding him in a kennel? That's what I do with mine when I go away. It's more pricey than a kennel, but she loves it and I get peace of mind. It's cage free. Dogs get to run and play all day, supervised by humans with squirt bottles who circulate among the pack making sure no trouble breaks out. For 'overnights' each dog sleeps in its own pen with items from home: a blanket, one toy, one bone, and a smelly T-shirt recently worn by its owner. They screen animals before they admit them, because obviously aggressive animals would spoil it for everyone.

Years ago, I boarded my older dog in a more traditional kennel, where he stayed in a pen. They exercised him, he got on fine; but the second time I did it he looked so sad when I picked him up I made the decision not to do that again, and I got a sitter to visit him in my home. She picked up after him, gave him food and love, and walked him twice daily. He preferred that. It all depends on the temperament of the dog. That link you provided looks like a decent place. Wherever you board him, your dog will need all his shots before he is admitted, as Erik said above.

The other alternatives are to check the Internet and your local pet food stores for people posting ads as pet sitters (see below). You might find someone who could either visit your home, or even live-in. I tried both, and it's luck of the draw, so ask for references. They can range in price, but a good sitter should have insurance and all the paperwork about what to do in case of emergencies. If they don't, you need to question that. Good luck to you on your surgery.

https://www.sittercity.com/pet-sitting/mt.html

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

It looks pretty standard. Probably the best thing you can do is look to Yelp, etc, for customer testimonials. Ultimately what it comes down to in this case is not the facilities but how well the staff keep on top of spot-cleaning messes, thoroughly cleaning on a daily basis, overseeing situations where dogs who don't know each other are introduced, that kind of thing.

As for the stay itself, it will of course be stressful for your dog. You might want to consider sleeping which a blanket (or stuffed animal) that your dog would like for a week or so prior to the stay so it gets to smelling like you. Ask them to put it in his kennel with him so that he has something that smells of you/home to cuddle with. Also make sure to leave plenty of his food with the kennel along with feeding instructions, as it can be stressful for some dogs to have to switch diets.


Thanks Mastadge! I never would have thought of the blanket with my scent. He has a N.Y. Yankees 'throw' blanket for the sofa so he doesn't get dog hair on my sofa. I guess I'll wash it and sleep on it for a week and have it placed in his sleep area when I take him there.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 11:54 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Make sure all your dog's vaccinations are up-to-date. Also, check to make sure the dog's personal area is large enough. I agree with the previous poster that it's helpful to take toys etc. that smells like you and/or your house.

One thing for your benefit would be for the kennel to send you "doggy pics" from time to time so you can see how he's doing. One facility here in Houston has several "doggy cams" that allow clients to log in to a website and see their pet in real time!

Best wishes to you for a successful operation and speedy recovery!


Thanks Eriknelson for the advice. When I took him to the vet a month ago I mentioned he may be going into a kennel for a while. That's where I was told to have him get his 'kennel cough' vaccination. He got it and all his shots are up to date with a 'document' from the Vet.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

If at all possible have a friend, relative or co-worker (you trust) watch your dog. I have no inside information on kennels but you know the promotional videos are going to put them in the best of light.
Good luck with your surgery and recovery.


What I found out is that when you ask someone to watch your 90 lb. Lab/Shepard mix, you suddenly find out you HAVE NO friends, relatives or co-workers. A Pharmacist friend was initially going to allow my dog to stay over his house. Then he told me when he asked his wife, she gave him 'a look' that he didn't want to press further.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Please, if you've ever boarded your dog before, are there any 'things' I should ask the kennel's staff before I take my dog there?

Hi, Dave.

Have you considered dog daycare, rather than boarding him in a kennel? That's what I do with mine when I go away. It's more pricey than a kennel, but she loves it and I get peace of mind. It's cage free. Dogs get to run and play all day, supervised by humans with squirt bottles who circulate among the pack making sure no trouble breaks out. For 'overnights' each dog sleeps in its own pen with items from home: a blanket, one toy, one bone, and a smelly T-shirt recently worn by its owner. They screen animals before they admit them, because obviously aggressive animals would spoil it for everyone.

Years ago, I boarded my older dog in a more traditional kennel, where he stayed in a pen. They exercised him, he got on fine; but the second time I did it he looked so sad when I picked him up I made the decision not to do that again, and I got a sitter to visit him in my home. She picked up after him, gave him food and love, and walked him twice daily. He preferred that. It all depends on the temperament of the dog. That link you provided looks like a decent place. Wherever you board him, your dog will need all his shots before he is admitted, as Erik said above.

The other alternatives are to check the Internet and your local pet food stores for people posting ads as pet sitters (see below). You might find someone who could either visit your home, or even live-in. I tried both, and it's luck of the draw, so ask for references. They can range in price, but a good sitter should have insurance and all the paperwork about what to do in case of emergencies. If they don't, you need to question that. Good luck to you on your surgery.

https://www.sittercity.com/pet-sitting/mt.html



Dogplant your suggestions sound just a shade less grand than Club-Med. They're excellent suggestions, but here in rural Montana, my options are few, and the great ideas you put forth sound better than what's available for travelers along the highway here in town who have nothing much to choose from for their own overnight stays. I would trade my worry from my dog to having to worry about my place if I allowed someone to come into my place. And I'd be concerned he'd 'get away, off his leash' if someone were to walk him outside of a fenced area. He's a spoiled big-dog. But I consider myself fortunate because he doesn't dig in the trash, bark unnecessarily, chew shoes or shred things, and he won't touch your dinner plate unless you give him permission even if there's a steak on it. (I should be so lucky). I think you are right about one thing, when I leave him there... I'll be afraid to look back. I'm afraid he'll have this look on his face like, 'WHERE ARE YOU GOING AND WHY AM I NOT GOING WITH YOU?'

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2014 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

I spoil mine, too, and you're right LA is full of cushy pet hotels! Good luck, Dave, definitely do the scent on the blanket trick, that's a comfort to them. Keep us posted how you get on.

 
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