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 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 2:56 AM   
 By:   timbox129   (Member)

Hello. My name is Timothy. And I am new here to this site.

Anyway, I don't know whether or not you could lock it away for good or move it to somewhere else, but I need some help regarding any potential music ideas/suggestions for a movie idea of mine...especially with which appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwinds, percussion, etc.) for me and/or a potential music composer to employ to represent two diverse cultures.



Most recently, I was talking about doing a live action/animated movie someday, a movie idea that is to be called ToonTalker, or something like that, and it is to be both an epic, Avatar-esque love story involving an animated cartoon human girl and a live action human boy as well as an animated cartoon fantasy-meets-live action reality epic coming-of-age saga.

But it is also to be one about some clash of good versus evil in which both humans and highly-stylized Genndy Tartakovsky/Samurai Jack-esque (and largely 2d hand-drawn) animated cartoons will come together into conflict with an evil Aku-like Dark Lord and his terrifying hordes of evil minions—all told through the eyes of two distinct characters (one live action, the other animated) and their respective families, two distinct worlds tethered into each other by some portal (like, for instance, one inside a TV set) that allows free passage between both worlds (complete with a change in aspect ratios to contrast the two worlds: the live action world of the Humans to be shown mainly in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio, while the animated world of the Toons is to be shown in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio), and two distinct cultures.

(I am really adamant that the live action family of the live action human boy and his cultural heritage be American, and I am also really adamant that the animated cartoon family of the animated cartoon girl and her cultural heritage be Japanese)

Anyway, in the case of the music score for my ToonTalker movie idea (the score for which is to be at once lush, ambitious, epic, cinematic, romantic and imbued with an ethnic flavor with some bits of toon music thrown in for some of my movie idea's more comedic bits), I have a question:

Which appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwind instruments, percussion instruments, etc.) should I, or even a potential music composer, employ in order for the music score for my ToonTalker movie idea to represent the diverse cultures of the live action human boy’s live action American family and his animated cartoon love’s animated cartoon Japanese family, respectively?

That is the question.

Any suggestions?

And can any of you look up or research the appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwinds, percussion, etc.) that is/are native to the respective American and Japanese musical cultures for me please?

Thanks!

I'd appreciate it if you do!

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   pete   (Member)

The Japanese instruments John Williams used in his Memoirs of a Geisha score are discussed in this video from 6:30

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 3:21 AM   
 By:   timbox129   (Member)

The Japanese instruments John Williams used in his Memoirs of a Geisha score are discussed in this video from 6:30



Thanks for the recommendation, Pete.

So what are the Japanese musical instruments that John Williams is talking about as well as employed in his score for Memoirs of a Geisha?

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   pete   (Member)


So what are the Japanese musical instruments that John Williams is talking about as well as employed in his score for Memoirs of a Geisha?


Beyond what is mentioned in the video, I have no idea. You might also like to check out Bear McCreary's blog. He used a lot of Japanese percussion in his Battlestar Galactica scores. You should be able to find all the details in his extensive blog entries here:

http://www.bearmccreary.com/#info-center/battlestar-galactica/

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 6:47 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Don't think you need to go right into the "ethnic" sounds to spotlight the American or Asian cultures. The audience will see they're different...spotlight their differences through the writing of the characters, not the score.

An emotional scene for an Asian can be score just as an emotional scene for an American. But, if this "epic" project does come to life, seems it's gonna be huge...seems you'd have a name composer...the composer will know the accents and instruments needed smile

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 8:48 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"But it is also to be one about some clash of good versus evil in which both humans and highly-stylized Genndy Tartakovsky/Samurai Jack-esque (and largely 2d hand-drawn) animated cartoons will come together into conflict with an evil Aku-like Dark Lord and his terrifying hordes of evil minions ..."

Just out of curiousity, but why don't you try and hire SJ composer James L. Venable?

http://www.venablemusic.com/JimsMusic/Home.html

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2014 - 3:27 AM   
 By:   timbox129   (Member)

Don't think you need to go right into the "ethnic" sounds to spotlight the American or Asian cultures. The audience will see they're different...spotlight their differences through the writing of the characters, not the score.

An emotional scene for an Asian can be score just as an emotional scene for an American. But, if this "epic" project does come to life, seems it's gonna be huge...seems you'd have a name composer...the composer will know the accents and instruments needed smile


Good Advice!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2014 - 5:22 AM   
 By:   wayfarer_1969   (Member)

I'm not going to pretend I know much about Japanese soundtracks other than this one composer but I highly recommend you check him out for inspiration: Kenji Kawai

He's quite prolific and employs various types of score in different movies. He handles action scenes extremely well and isn't afraid to use traditional sounds and instrumentation.

 
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