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 Posted:   Apr 24, 2014 - 11:11 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

I only found out by chance last weekend that the biggest epic of them all(!!!) was back in theaters in the U.S. for four performances - two over last weekend and two showings on Wednesday. It was shown in Regal Cinemas nationwide- it is part of a five film Epic series including BEN-HUR, GLADIATOR, TITANIC and SPARTACUS -

I could not go over the weekend so set aside five hours yesterday to see to my all time favorite again(!!!). And I am so glad that I did - it looked great and sounded wonderful.

In the end credits , there was 2010 restoration tag -- part of the BR ? - but it really looked like a film. I have never seen this shown in its entirety in a cinema before including the Overture, Entr'Acte and Exit Music plus the original roadshow introduction by Mr. DeMille. With a 15 minute intermission, it ran about 4 hrs and 10 minutes. Amazing!

Even after literally 100s of viewings over the last 58 years, I still found new details and wonderful moments to relive. For example, I noticed that a number of dialogue driven scenes especially in the first half , fade to black but one still sees characters talking - lips still moving -suggesting in the editting quite a few scenes were abbreviated. I would love to compare an early draft of the screenplay to the finished one -- I am sure that there would be some interesting variations. Even though the dialogue is often poked fun at it because of its supposed overblown or archaic style/structure, I actually believe that the four screenwriters created a classic film --- partly by skillfully interweaving various fictional plots along with as much Bible and historical accuracy as possible -- I am sure some fans after all these years believe that an Egyptian Queen named Neferteri hardened Pharoah's heart against Moses and almost prevented the Exodus.

Because of the clarity of the sound, I heard lines that proabably have never been this clear in a theater before- for example when Moses is brought in chains before Sethi , you could every word that minor players were suppose to be somewhat saying under their breath. It just stuck me that technology has given more detail to this already amazing film.

I know that this is very different than BEN-HUR - that it doesnt have the "intelligence" or reputation of the Wyler masterpiece. Still it is loved by movie fans worldwide, maybe more than any other similar film including BH . So there is something here that is unique --- iconic , amazing, perfect -- I dont know the right adjective.

My only quibble with this showing was I remember back in the late 50s + 60s that the Vista Vision Technicolor was more eye popping than in this restored effort. Could it be my eyes? Did I see it more vividly as a child or teenager ? Maybe someone else saw this in theaters and understands this besides me -- it looked great - sharp, accurate, faithful to the original but not as intense. Maybe this comes from watching it so much on the TV screen and being able to adjust it to higher intensity? Something is different.

Still - if you ever have an opportunity to ever see TTC on a giant screen in the future , do it ---you won't regret it .

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2014 - 11:57 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Sorry I didn't know about this. I saw TTC in a theater during an early 1970s re-release, but it was shorn of all additional music and the intermission. I wonder if Regal was just projecting the Blu-ray, up-rezzed to 4K.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2014 - 3:17 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

I wasn't able to go, but I do want to see some of the others in this series, especially Spartacus.

It's not just a Regal thing, incidentally; AMC theaters are doing it, too (I actually thought it was an AMC-specific thing until seeing your post just now).

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2014 - 1:35 PM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

TC is practically my daughter's favorite movie. When she was younger I would run my dye-transfer print for her a couple of times a year. Monday I called her in Chicago and asked if she watched it on ABC. She screamed "Yes! How'd you know!?" Then she asked "What did they do to the color? It was too bright!" I told her she had been spoiled by Technicolor.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2014 - 4:26 AM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

TC is practically my daughter's favorite movie. When she was younger I would run my dye-transfer print for her a couple of times a year. Monday I called her in Chicago and asked if she watched it on ABC. She screamed "Yes! How'd you know!?" Then she asked "What did they do to the color? It was too bright!" I told her she had been spoiled by Technicolor.

So Ray -
would you say then that the eye popping Technicolor of the original VistaVision has not been preserved in this 2010 restoration? Or is that it cannot be produced as digitally as well as it was in IB prints??
the Stereo sound was crystal clear and spread out over the front speakers but it did not have the immersive surround that I have first heard on Laserdisc Sp Ed.

 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2014 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

I wouldn't say as I haven't seen the restoration. And I don't know what was run on ABC. My IB feature print went vinegar years ago and I had to sell it for scrap. I still have a gorgeous dye transfer print of the 10 minute trailer hosted by DeMille as well as a newer LPP print.

Old Tech isn't necessarily the last word. The greatest thing I've ever seen on the screen is the new restored print of Universal's PHANTOM OF THE OPERA with Claude Rains. I saw the IB nitrate print in LA several years ago and this new print (I saw it in a theater in 35mm) beat it by a mile.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 30, 2014 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

did anyone else see this last week at Cinemark or Regal Cinemas?

If so, what were you thoughts?

 
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