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 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I think the desire to be 'different' from everyone else is quite strong with many teenagers trying to find themselves, just as peer pressure is for those who have no interest in being special.


I've found that the desire to be different is usually a front or an affectation. It's the desire to be oneself that has the staying power.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Me and my mates, during our early teens, used to sit in a mates house (who had a spare room) on dark/cold nights and we would all have a night to choose the music we would play on the record player in the room, that everyone would listen to.
I remember the night I brought my new ALIEN soundtrack by Jerry Goldsmith!!!
If I didn't have a thick skin before that night, the abuse and stick I took during that one helped me develop one quick smart.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 7:22 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Me and my mates, during our early teens, used to sit in a mates house (who had a spare room) on dark/cold nights and we would all have a night to choose the music we would play on the record player in the room, that everyone would listen to.
I remember the night I brought my new ALIEN soundtrack by Jerry Goldsmith!!!
If I didn't have a thick skin before that night, the abuse and stick I took during that one helped me develop one quick smart.


Today they'd all be on smartphones listening to their own music or sharing playlists or ear buds. Somethin gained and something lost. Individuality vs getting along with group.

 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

Apparently the answer to my question is that anyone born after 1980 does not post to this thread! smile

Where are all the Zimmer kids when I need 'em?

 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Today they'd all be on smartphones listening to their own music or sharing playlists or ear buds. Somethin gained and something lost. Individuality vs getting along with group.

I forget which one, but there was an episode of Star Trek: TNG where the entire crew--except Wesley--were addicted to a hand-held video game thing. I love it when Sci-Fi correctly predicts the future. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I think all the Zimmer kids are probably off programming their own scores right now!
I remember thinking, when I first got into listening to film scores 'I could never write this'.
Now, I think 'I could easily programme this'...but that's a whole 'nother topic I guess wink

 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Apparently the answer to my question is that anyone born after 1980 does not post to this thread! smile

Where are all the Zimmer kids when I need 'em?


I tried getting the people who refuse to watch black & white movies on the thread I wrote and got the same result. Perhaps their silence is their shame. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 8:16 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

Interesting discussion. I like the points made about limited choices of programming and being forced to discover new things because there was nothing else on. I grew interested in film music in the very early dial up days of the internet, pre-Youtube, when the only way to listen to samples of music online was through crappy 30 s real media files that were endlessly buffering.

I actually have to credit Ford Thaxton and his Soundtrack Cinema radio show that I could tune into weekly on my FM radio (and which I'd often tape and re-listen to on my Walkman) for forcing me to try new things... in particular older film music. I've noticed that, since the advent of the Youtube era, the amount of sampling of unfamiliar artists that I've done has gone down, despite the availability of a greater amount of material having gone up. I find I preferentially tend to listen to artists that I know and like, rather than trying things I've never heard of. I suppose I need to start listening to score podcasts on a regular basis to get back that diversity.

Chris.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 11:30 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

I forget which one, but there was an episode of Star Trek: TNG where the entire crew--except Wesley--were addicted to a hand-held video game thing. I love it when Sci-Fi correctly predicts the future. wink


I loved the double irony of that episode's premise. Riker first falls prey to the game while gettin' some, but Wesley resists trying it because he's busy trying really hard to get some.

big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 11:44 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO CAPTAIN AVIS-Yes I agree, years ago for many people in the world there was not much choice, today there is. When people here talked about some youth have no interest in B/W FILMS, I feel maybe they are being a little too negative. On cable you do have stations like TCM and others. DVD's and the internet[you tube] which does offer an incredible variety of stuff from the B/W ERA.Now before the video, internet, cable era there was just about nothing for a large chunk of America, no less the rest of the world to see old stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Interesting discussion. I like the points made about limited choices of programming and being forced to discover new things because there was nothing else on. I grew interested in film music in the very early dial up days of the internet, pre-Youtube, when the only way to listen to samples of music online was through crappy 30 s real media files that were endlessly buffering.

Well, I'll beat that. I'm actually old enough to remember when new film music could only be heard in the listening booths in record stores -- when the internet was nothing but a concept among high tech firms!

 
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