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 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 8:17 AM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

This might be a musically better informed group of 10-25 year olds around here than most places but I was wondering what “old” music do you kids know?

I was just listening to The Pink Panther, a theme that pre-dates me by about six years. I was thinking about what music I knew that would have been "old" by the time I was in high school.

I knew the music from The Wizard of Oz, Gone with the Wind, and Casablanca. I knew who Glenn Miller was. Psycho was a given (even though I never sat down to watch the film until I was 23).

And don’t think I was all that unusual in this regard. This was just kind of common pop culture stuff. It showed up on cartoons and in other movies and tv shows. If you were watching “grown up” stuff like Carol Burnett or Airplane (ahem) it was all just kind of there.

What would be the analogues for the millennials (if I’m using the right term)?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 8:37 AM   
 By:   dbrooks   (Member)

I am in my mid thirties so I guess I am not a kid anymore. But my wife rolls her eyes when I listen to 50s and 60s rock and watch shows like Twilight Zone, Andy Griffith and The Honeymooners. I admit that I have always been out of touch with the new popular culture but I can't help it. I wish I lived in America's golden age.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Same here. I'm also in my mid 30s, so I can't answer for today's kids.

However, I remember exploring earlier stuff relatively early in my film music exploration days. Maybe after about 4-5 years of more contemporary fare, I started delving into the past. I was in my late teens at the time.

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

When I was in my 20s I was listening to Xenakis, Ligeti, Crumb, Varese, guys like that. I enjoyed Goldenthal because he balanced those influences with Mahler and more tonal composers.

But to be fair, I was a music major at university so I was exposed to a lot of music that most people wouldn't be.

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I get the impression that a lot of younger people get their "old" pop culture references via the new things they watch. I've lost track--not that I'm counting--of the number of times there's been a YouTube comment on some old song where someone says "Thumbs up if you heard this song on [current popular TV show name]."

There's also a lot more pop culture out there and a lot of the stuff we grew up on is treated with a sort of looking down the nose and with a ton of dismissive "irony" so as to treat said old stuff with less respect, as it were. I hope this makes sense...

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Those kids these days with their "MTVs" and their "Big Macs" I tell ya!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 10:34 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

When I was in my 20s I was listening to Xenakis, Ligeti, Crumb, Varese, guys like that. I enjoyed Goldenthal because he balanced those influences with Mahler and more tonal composers.

But to be fair, I was a music major at university so I was exposed to a lot of music that most people wouldn't be.


I took a classical music course in college. Varese never came up. The only Varese I know of and ever known Is Varese-Sarabande. Have to check out the original.

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

I would say likely the same I knew at the age; not from a musically inclined background, so I learned as I went, and I guess this is the path of many from non-musically inclined backgrounds.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Mmm. Born in '61, I was already listening to my uncles' chart records by the age of at least 3-4 years old. I always begged for Downtown by Petula Clarke, and any Beatles, but my most requested records were the single releases of the tv themes for Out of this World by Tony Hatch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liHNAL521NU , and the Decca single of the Doctor Who theme http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGywYOmoTwk. So I was a soundtrack fan by a very early age, that is before school started!

Just after starting school, the above two became part of my first collection of ten records for my brand new Chad Valley Close and Play record player https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=chad+valley+close+n+play&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=yDIOU9zBHceW0QWxtYFg&ved=0CEMQsAQ&biw=1440&bih=775 (first three pictures) in about '65-'66. The rest of that collection contained Adam Faith's Poor Me, Carry On fim star Sydney James' The 'Ooter Song http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCcuWxvOTsk , and a novelty by the Moontrekkers called Night of the Vampire http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qi9waU7LlE8 .

Long before the sixties finished I was as fond of 50s rock and roll as I was the latest thing. In other words I've always appreciated what went before as much as the latest music. Brought my daughter up the same. 22 now she has Elvis, Beatles, Beach Boys etc on whatever music gadget she has, as well as her current chart favourites and loves Danny Elfman's stuff too. Mainly anything connected to Tim Burton and the odd Disney fave.

My Doctor Who fixation (including it's music) was always parallel to my emerging love of movie music, first through Bernard Herrmann's Ray Harryhausen scores, and then through the music of Rozsa, Korngold, Barry and Morricone.

On a daily basis now, in work I hear whatever's on BBC Radio 2, as they play anything from the year dot to the very latest chart. At least those things easy enough on my older ear. Basically, despite a particular leaning towards movie music, I've always had a wide ranging taste, and would always urge any younger person I know to give most things a chance.

 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

When I was growing up, there were no VCRs, no DVDs, no streaming video. When something came on television that was kid-compatible, you watched it. And so boys watched princess movies because they were on "The Wonderful World of Disney" and what else were you going to watch?

These days -- and I'm not saying it's a tragedy, but it is different -- my kids have a breadth of choices that I couldn't have dreamed of, but ironically that results in narrower cultural awareness.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 26, 2014 - 7:28 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Years ago people were force to basically watch new things. In most of rural America you only got the 3 networks at best, so it was just new stuff of that time. People in big metropolitan areas were luckier, they got stations , indie or local stations which showed old product, old films and TV shows. But even in these situations those stations got much lower rating then the networks did, so the average TV viewer didn't' t see much old stuff either. If many people would have enjoyed such stuff, nobody will ever know.Movie houses as well showed current features. Revival houses for the most part were also the culture of big cities and again a much smaller crowd went to those films. Today the youth have an immense choice. Creeping through are alot of old stuff the inquisitive youth will find and explore,

 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 2:06 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I loved 60s TV, 40s & 50s films more than contemporary stuff when I was a kid in the 70s and 80s, and I know this was unusual amongst my friends and peers.

I talk to my sister's kids and find they know nothing of my pop culture and I nothing of theirs. Nor is either party much inclined to learn.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 2:23 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

When I was growing up, there were no VCRs, no DVDs, no streaming video. When something came on television that was kid-compatible, you watched it. And so boys watched princess movies because they were on "The Wonderful World of Disney" and what else were you going to watch?

These days -- and I'm not saying it's a tragedy, but it is different -- my kids have a breadth of choices that I couldn't have dreamed of, but ironically that results in narrower cultural awareness.


Agreed on that, Schiffy. I'm actually grateful for the lack of choice back then, because I saw an awful lot of old (even then) films on the telly. If I were a teen today, I don't know if I'd have the will-power to explore old things, so I can't blame them (although I congratulate those who do make the effort). Such a bombardment of things coming in from all sources now, it's all a blur. But I'm sure that I'm exaggerating the negative effects. Youngsters are, in many ways, a lot sharper and able to adapt to change than my generation was...

I started off agreeing with you Schiffy, but ended up not so sure. Is that a sign that my brain is still agile, or quite the contrary?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 2:49 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Maybe the question shouldn't be 'what do kids know today?', but rather 'what do WE know about what kids know today?'.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Maybe the question shouldn't be 'what do kids know today?', but rather 'what do WE know about what kids know today?'.

Further to that (and to my own rabbit above it), it might be interesting to speculate (I know how much you hate those scenarios, Thor) how WE might have developed our own interest in film scores had we been born several decades before or after... There's a bit of nature/nurture in there. I'm just wondering how I became fascinated by films and music from about the age of ten, and if I would move in a similar direction if I were a ten-year-old now. The world has changed very much in these last ten years, and I'm guessing that the "nostalgia" factor (I don't even know if that's relevant) won't even be present in the future.

Food for thought - without wishing a derailment of the thread. And I apologise for not keeping my rabbits under control. No time to think today (THAT certainly didn't happen when I was ten)!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 4:52 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Well, you do have a point. I think the desire to be 'different' from everyone else is quite strong with many teenagers trying to find themselves, just as peer pressure is for those who have no interest in being special.

I think if you did a poll here on FSM or any other niche community, you'd find that be a recurring feature in most people's formative years. And I think that's valid for any age group, really. The same for us as kids as it is for today's kids, even though many other things have changed.

 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 4:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I loved 60s TV, 40s & 50s films more than contemporary stuff when I was a kid in the 70s and 80s, and I know this was unusual amongst my friends and peers.

I talk to my sister's kids and find they know nothing of my pop culture and I nothing of theirs. Nor is either party much inclined to learn.


This is my experience, as well. I remember watching Bullitt one morning and a neighbor--who is a year older than me-- stopped over and interrupted himself to ask what the hell I was watching with "that music"; he didn't know what it was and he didn't like it, either.

As for the kids--maybe not their Big Macs--but with their constant thumb thumping--wink I haven't met too many who embrace or even know about anything that existed before they did (I work at a college).

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

At 10, I don't recall any desire to be different. I hung around with my mates and they found it strange that I loved the End Title from JAWS so much and later, started buying all these weird LP's of music from films (they don't have any singing or words!!! they would mock, as they bought their Clash, Jam and Sex Pistols LP's).
Thankfully, I was a fairly confident kid so I knew what I liked and wasn't going to pretend otherwise, just to conform with their tastes.
I have no idea what happened in my brain for me to fasten onto film music and I did like other stuff too, starting with Marc Bolan and T-REX, moving onto Queen and ELO albums and becoming a big fan of early U2 stuff, REM, EELS and lots of other random music (not Jazz or Opera though and only a smidgen of classical music...the stuff that sounds like film music wink
I do agree that my points of reference were hugely different from what's available today.
I'm also thankful there was a limit of sorts, which helped me focus more on the stuff I loved.
Nowadays, it's a smorgasbord (always loved that word) of stuff that would probably overwhelm my young/teenage brain.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 5:56 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

What I've never been able to decide is if our path and choices in life are down to random luck/fate (call it what you will) or some generic wiring that would propel us down our chosen paths anyway?
If I hadn't heard that B side from JAWS in my mates house at 10 and noticed/got interested in STAR WARS around 12/13, would something else have grabbed me and triggered my love of all things John Williams?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 27, 2014 - 6:31 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Confidence in one's own taste/a desire to be different -- it's basically the same side of the coin in this particular case (confronted by peer pressure as EVERY single teenager is).

 
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