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 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Here's a link to the article I'm reading, with the video attached.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/watch-45-minute-roundtable-with-composers-hans-zimmer-steven-price-alan-silvestri-more-20131223

 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 1:20 PM   
 By:   Mike Skerritt   (Member)

Here's a link to the article I'm reading, with the video attached.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/watch-45-minute-roundtable-with-composers-hans-zimmer-steven-price-alan-silvestri-more-20131223


Great stuff! And I for one can't wait to see Paul Giamatti and Michael J. Fox co-starring in a buddy movie as Beck and Newman, running a private detective agency.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I love these yearly roundtable discussions from THR -- even though the questions aren't the most insightful and the 'stories' much of the same and what we already know, it's still great to see these guys chat with each other in a somewhat informal setting.

 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 6:04 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

The love of Predator 2 from Jackman and Zimmer was pretty awesome.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   lonzoe1   (Member)

Yeah that moment was awesome. Predator 2 is a great score, imho. It's nice to see film composers commending one another on their work. Plus this gives me hope that Jackman's upcoming Captain America 2 score will keep Silvestri's theme and style.

I only wish the interview was longer. Both hosts rushed them out of there. And last year's composer roundtable was a little over an hour. While this one was about 45 min.

And if only John Williams would show up for one of these. Would love to see the interaction between him and other film composers.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 8:41 PM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

I suspect if John Williams were part of one of these round table discussions there would be too much fawning on the part of some, perhaps all, of the other participating composers ('Your score for "Star Wars" changed my life...') I know if I were on a panel on which he was taking part, I'd keep my question responses as succinct as possible so "the man" had every chance for discourse.

 
 Posted:   Dec 23, 2013 - 9:02 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

I'm enjoying this but I find it ironic how cheesy the music they use in the video is (when it isn't in a film clip). Considering that we are watching a video about film composers you'd expect they could find something a little more interesting in the library.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 2:26 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I suspect if John Williams were part of one of these round table discussions there would be too much fawning on the part of some, perhaps all, of the other participating composers ('Your score for "Star Wars" changed my life...') I know if I were on a panel on which he was taking part, I'd keep my question responses as succinct as possible so "the man" had every chance for discourse.

Exactly. He would be a "God" to many, and while Williams is pretty good and humble in receiving praise, it would be a bit awkward -- at least to me. That being said, I'd love to see him participate in a heartbeat. Most of the interviews that have been conducted with him are more formal -- this would be a rare chance to see him in a more informal setting.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 2:33 AM   
 By:   pzfan   (Member)

Unfortunately, Avira antivirus is reporting some virus on that page, can't watch it.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 2:37 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Virus? ThePlaylist is one of the most respected film sites on the internet, so that seems odd.

However, you can also view it directly on THR's website if you wish.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 3:36 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

I suspect if John Williams were part of one of these round table discussions there would be too much fawning on the part of some, perhaps all, of the other participating composers ('Your score for "Star Wars" changed my life...') I know if I were on a panel on which he was taking part, I'd keep my question responses as succinct as possible so "the man" had every chance for discourse.

Exactly. He would be a "God" to many, and while Williams is pretty good and humble in receiving praise, it would be a bit awkward -- at least to me. That being said, I'd love to see him participate in a heartbeat. Most of the interviews that have been conducted with him are more formal -- this would be a rare chance to see him in a more informal setting.


Yes, in theory, it's a "neat idea" to have John Williams participate in a dialogue with other composers. But I know friends who have seen him at BMI functions and such and, even in this setting, they say it's like kids lining up at the mall to see/talk to Santa Claus (do they do this in Norway, Thor?). My feeling is that instead of a meaningful dialogue taking place amongst seven composer panel interviewees you'd have one interviewee (Williams) and six interviewers (not including the HR people).

I watched the last interview and thought Steven Price was the most interesting to observe as he spent most of his time listening and absorbing (just what I would do) while the others were "holding court."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 4:03 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

My one dream is to have a 1-hour sitdown with Williams to talk about his career. I don't fawn and swoon; that's not my angle in the interviews I've conducted with, say, James Horner, James Newton Howard or Elliot Goldenthal. I'm more interested in getting in-depth and being 'case-specific'. Hollywood-type swooning is very far removed from the Norwegian sentiment.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 4:14 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Hollywood-type swooning is very far removed from the Norwegian sentiment.

Yes, I wonder where that "ass-kissing", as I usually call it, come from. Some american interviews are almost embarrassing to listen to, with not a critical question in sight.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 4:35 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

Hollywood-type swooning is very far removed from the Norwegian sentiment.

Yes, I wonder where that "ass-kissing", as I usually call it, come from. Some american interviews are almost embarrassing to listen to, with not a critical question in sight.


The entertainment news shows here are the worst for this. Shows like Entertainment Tonight used to do segments on people like Horner and Williams (including footage from a "Space Camp" session), but now can't seem to do an entire show where the focus isn't Kim Kardashian, George Clooney or Miley Cirus.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 4:39 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

My one dream is to have a 1-hour sitdown with Williams to talk about his career. I don't fawn and swoon; that's not my angle in the interviews I've conducted with, say, James Horner, James Newton Howard or Elliot Goldenthal. I'm more interested in getting in-depth and being 'case-specific'. Hollywood-type swooning is very far removed from the Norwegian sentiment.

Hey, Thor. Just for fun compile the three-to-five questions you think John Williams has been asked the most (and you would therefore avoid asking). I would think you would ask him at least one question about his involvement with "Gilligan's Island." Am I right?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Most-asked questions....well, I'm sure most of us could come up with a few candidates -- especially in relation to his work with Spielberg, what "inspires" him to write the music he does etc. Williams also has a set of 'standard' replies to some issues that he keeps repeating over and over again because the interviewers can't think of something original (the hundreds of versions of the 5-note theme from CE3K, the Spielberg surprise at the JAWS motif etc.).

I don't know if I would have asked him about GILLIGAN'S ISLAND, in particular, but I would ask some questions about his early years -- formulated in a way that didn't put him on the spot (I'm sure his memory of specific shows and work in the 50s and 60s is quite limited; so he has said).

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2013 - 3:43 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Hollywood-type swooning is very far removed from the Norwegian sentiment.

Yes, I wonder where that "ass-kissing", as I usually call it, come from. Some american interviews are almost embarrassing to listen to, with not a critical question in sight.


What you both are describing is not a failure of critical thinking here in Hollywood but rather a studio publicity machine operating at peak efficiency. These "interviews" exist solely to promote the project or the personality himself. If you want (say) Tom Cruise on your show or in your magazine, it will boost your ratings or your sales. But the deal -- sometimes explicit, sometimes implicit -- is that you lob softball questions that will make him look smart and charming. If you don't play by these rules, good luck getting him or anybody associated with him or the project or studio or publicist again.

Don't confuse these interviews with academic pursuits. They are unrelated, though the former might pose as the latter.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2013 - 9:06 AM   
 By:   WavyRancheros   (Member)

While I like the Gravity score, and Price's interview is very interesting, I wish I would be able to see the film without a musical score.

 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2013 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Finally got around to watching this. Yes, all the Silvestri love from the other composers is awesome toward the end of the video: PREDATOR 2 from Jackman and Zimmer, and ROMANCING THE STONE from Newman. I love that they all show him so much respect and admiration… I wasn't expecting that at all!

I also appreciated that toward the beginning when Silvestri spoke about how working with Dreamworks Animation for the first time was challenging because of all the review sessions, Zimmer kind of accepted some blame for setting that precedent. He doesn't get nearly enough flack for making life difficult for other composers, in my opinion.

 
 Posted:   Dec 27, 2013 - 7:15 AM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Also, I thought it was interesting that Zimmer kept calling THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION "the score that changed everything."

All in all, I found this round table to be much more interesting than the one from last year. I thought it was fascinating to see Silvestri, Newman and Price in particular chat away… all intelligent guys that conversed really well together. The bit toward the end where Newman asks Silvestri about the bridge scene from ROMANCING THE STONE was great… when do you ever get to see composers talking shop like that together?

 
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