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 Posted:   Dec 1, 2013 - 6:15 AM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

French label Carlotta Films has revealed that it plans to release on Blu-ray acclaimed director Billy Wilder's (Sunset Boulevard, Kiss Me, Stupid) Fedora (1978), starring William Holden, Marthe Keller, Michael York, Mario Adorf, José Ferrer, and Hildegard Knef. The preliminary release date set by Carlotta Films is February 26th.

Fedora was recently restored in 2K by Bavaria Media in cooperation with CinePostproduction, Germany. Earlier this year, the new restoration was screened in the Classics section of the Cannes Film Festival.

http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=12695

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2013 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   Jameson281   (Member)

Olive Films has announced plans to release a Blu-ray in the U.S. in 2014; no release date has been announced.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2013 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   Brad Wills   (Member)

Any word as to whether Rozsa's butchered score will be reinstated in its proper form?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2013 - 1:59 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

By "restored," they mean the quality of the picture?

Or, have any additional scenes been added?

Not a bad movie, with not a bad score; just very reminiscent of SUNSET BOULEVARD, which was way better... (Also reminds me of another old-star-makes-comeback film, THE LEGEND OF LYLAH CLARE, which is more of a potboiler, though still entertaining.)

 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2013 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

John: Re: "Not a bad movie, with not a bad score; just very reminiscent of SUNSET BOULEVARD, which was way better... (Also reminds me of another old-star-makes-comeback film, THE LEGEND OF LYLAH CLARE, which is more of a potboiler, though still entertaining.)"

This is funny. I read the above before looking to see who had written it, and I said "That's John," and it was.

 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

There are two VERY GOOD things about "Fedora".

First and foremost, there is the soundtrack album of the score by Rozsa. Not the mix in the film...just the LP and CD soundtracks.

Second is the scene in which Henry Fonda (playing himself) presents an Oscar to "faux" Fedora. I think this scene was what Wilder was hoping the whole film would live up to.

It will, however, be as huge a disappointment on Blu ray as it was in the theater.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 11:26 AM   
 By:   Brad Wills   (Member)

There are two VERY GOOD things about "Fedora".

First and foremost, there is the soundtrack album of the score by Rozsa. Not the mix in the film...just the LP and CD soundtracks.

Second is the scene in which Henry Fonda (playing himself) presents an Oscar to "faux" Fedora. I think this scene was what Wilder was hoping the whole film would live up to.

It will, however, be as huge a disappointment on Blu ray as it was in the theater.


It suffered tremendously is post-production, apparently. The ultimate fatal flaw, IMO, is the dreadful dubbing of Marthe Keller and Hildegarde Neff. Ruins the whole movie. As for the score, the LP/CD is a lush re-recording. It would be great if the original sessions have been used to create a brand new mix, and present the score intact. It would probably give to to the film the suggestion of crumbling grandeur that it sorely needs. Still, I find the story intriguing.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2016 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

I have the new UK combined Blu-ray/DVD of FEDORA released by Eureka in their Masters of Cinema series (officially released 26 September). This release includes for the first time anywhere, as an extra, all of the material cut from Billy Wilder's intended original version, prior to studio showings. After the first screening, Lorimar president Lee Rich's first words were "How much are you going to take out Billy?"

Included in the set, is a substantial booklet which includes an article by Rex McGee (Wilder's assistant on the film who also plays the photographer) originally published in American Film cataloging the trials and tribulations of the film - from where the story about the studio screening appears. The deleted scenes total about 12 minutes (courtesy of Rex McGee?). Many of the cuts are extremely brief, sometimes just a word or two; but nothing of significance so far as content was cut. The cutting of a substantial portion of Rozsa's music is of course another matter entirely. The lengthiest cuts are those involving the young Barry when first meeting Fedora in Hollywood and extended scenes with Barry and the hotel manager. Much of the cut material includes Rozsa's music as it was originally intended. The problem with cutting scenes which have already been scored, of course, is that it makes it difficult to re-dub the music for the scenes as cut which no longer fit, which no doubt is why so much of the music ended up being deleted or dialed down.

There's an interesting little continuity error in the film when Barry arrives in his hotel room and finds the bathroom lamp not working. The manager says he'll fix it but after taking his phone call to Fedora's house Barry moves back into the bathroom and we see the lamp miraculously alight. Viewing the deleted material we now see that there was an extension to the scene where we see the lamp being replaced.

The Blu-ray is locked to region B.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2016 - 10:58 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Apparently, FEDORA had its share of distribution woes in the U.S.. At the time, Lorimar Productions was using Allied Artists for its distribution. AA had distributed Lorimar's TWILIGHT'S LAST GLEAMING the previous year. However, Allied Artists dropped FEDORA after a poor response to its exhibition at a New York City Myasthenia Gravis Foundation Charity Benefit screening. Lorimar then considered releasing the film directly to television, via a broadcast on CBS, but before the network could finalize the deal, United Artists picked up the movie for theatrical distribution.

Wilder was unhappy about the film's distribution. According to the book On Sunset Boulevard: The Life and Times of Billy Wilder by Ed Sikov, FEDORA had only a limited release in some European and American markets with little publicity. An upset Billy Wilder complained that UA spent only "about $625 on a marketing campaign."

 
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