Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 8:35 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Joanne Woodward once sagely commented something along the lines that Intensity in an actor is all well
and good but becomes richly boring after awhile - and that goes for British as well as their Amurrican cousins.
Twas precisely this trait that put us off Mr. Fiennes for ages until being incredibly impressed with the subtle
layers of anchored authority, wry world-weariness and unexpected personal panache in "Skyfall".



Mind yu, we had no idea what or why (let alone who) his character was going to be, so as it unfolded and became
more apparent he wasn't going to be subsidiary but clearly substantial, we gradually were won over so that, by the
end, not only were we profoundly pleased



but acute with anticipation awaiting his next assuming of the smile Mantle. wink

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Linda Hunt's role as the male Kwan in "The Year of Living Dangerously."

Peter O'Toole as Henry II in "The Lion In Winter" (less so in the earlier film "Becket").

Ralph Fiennes as the mad Harry in "In Bruges." (And wasn't he wonderful as Count Laszlo de Almásy in "The English Patient"?)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:37 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

Recently, I'd forgotten how good an actor Tom Hanks was, but that breakdown scene at the end of Captain Phillips is probably some of the greatest acting I've ever seen.
I was tearing up just watching it. If there's any justice, he should get another one of those silly Gold things next year.

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:40 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Kev: Elsewhere, in a post about watching "The Road To Perdition" last night, I neglected to cite Hanks. But I was reminded last night of how good he was in that film, and near the end, where he has to shoot the man who raised him as as more of a son than his real son, the pain in his eyes is heartbreaking!!!

And Daniel Craig as the horrible son of Paul Newman in "Perdition," no matter how much we hate him, is sooooooooooo good!

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:46 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Ralph Fiennes was excellent in Cronenberg's "Spider", great performance.

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:50 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Ralph Fiennes ALWAYS gives a great performance!

I've often laughed over the years at the mispronunciation of his name. He merely goes by RAFE instead of Ralph, with the L silent, which was a tradition in Britain. But many Americans thought it was Ray (as in Ray Fiennes) when in fact it was Rafe Fiennes (or maybe they just slur it as Rayfiennes). Too many Fs there for some people!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

"I neglected to cite Hanks. But I was reminded last night of how good he was in that film, and near the end, where he has to shoot the man who raised him as as more of a son than his real son, the pain in his eyes is heartbreaking"
------------------------------------------
Aye Ron, that's a fantastic scene (in the pouring rain), that's beautifully shot and scored, in a film choc full of beautiful scenes and scoring. And Craig is indeed perfect as the jealous, psychotic son.
I also agree with you that the film will be heralded much more in the future, than it was during it's initial release. It's nigh on perfect. Just great film making.

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Kev: Which is why I bought it as soon as it was released on Blu-ray despite having it on DVD. It looked and sounded gorgeous when I watched it last night! Now I want to go back and re-listen to director Mendes' audio commentary, which I don't think I've played since I heard it on the original DVD. Incidentally, in the wonderful extra on the career of cinematographer Conrad Hall, director Mendes talks about that scene in the rain, and how overjoyed he was at how well Hall filmed it -- excellent scene!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Not quite sure what the question actually means, neo, nor how it differs from the "Great Individual Performances" (or something) thread, but any time is a good time to mention yet again the wonderful integrity, dignity and humanity behind almost anything from -

James Stewart - (Possible favourite: IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE).

Henry Fonda - (Possible Favourite: TWELVE ANGRY MEN).

Gregory Peck - (Possible Favourite: TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD).

Spencer Tracy - (Possible Favourite: BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK).

Sorry if I'm a bit off-topic.

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Graham: I was about to write that those were mostly very good choices, especially Henry Fonda in "12 Angry Men" and Gregory Peck in "To Kill A Mockingbird," but think that by asking "What Role Made U Appreciate an Actor's Artistry" the writer here (neotrinity) wanted us to dig a bit deeper than just actors doing great work. Which of those maybe startled you about their acting ability? I know that I was startled by the ones I cited -- Linda Hunt, Peter O'Toole, Ralph Fiennes. And, over and beyond "Gump" and "Philadelphia" and even "The Green Mile," I think that Tom Hanks really became an actor with "The Road To Perdition." At least for me he did.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Graham: I was about to write that those were mostly very good choices, especially Henry Fonda in "12 Angry Men" and Gregory Peck in "To Kill A Mockingbird," but think that by asking "What Role Made U Appreciate an Actor's Artistry" the writer here (neotrinity) wanted us to dig a bit deeper than just actors doing great work. Which of those maybe startled you about their acting ability? I know that I was startled by the ones I cited -- Linda Hunt, Peter O'Toole, Ralph Fiennes.

If that's the case, Ron, then one actor who immediately springs to mind is Nick Nolte. I'd never considered him as a great actor until I saw the admittedly uneven AFTERGLOW. I'm always devastated by the ending, due to the heartrending performances of Nolte, Julie Christie, and the use of Tom Waits growling of the Sondheim/ Bernstein song "Somewhere"...

Then I thought that maybe that was just a one-off piece, a lucky combination of factors hitting the right tone at the right time. But I was genuinely surprised at the sustained brilliance of Nolte's performance in AFFLICTION. That's a great film, and a lot of it is down to Nolte's angst-ridden performance, teetering on the edge of madness, always on the verge of going off the rails - and blaming it all on his toothache!

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Sorry, Mick, his perf in the vignette above and sequence below are, for us, all aces (with no Vee for vigilante anywhar in sight razz )

[ And mucho obligo, Ron II, as that's egg-zactly what our original intentions were re, as Jacob Needleman always advocates, "Deepening the Questions". smile And let's belay the formality from here on, shall oui? Make it neo, Pally. wink ]

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 11:07 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Could choose better perfomances by same people but these were the ones that struck me at time of viewing.

eli wallach - GBU

laurence olivier and charles laughton - spartacus

peter o toole - orrence of arabia

al pacino - the godfather

lee strasberg - godfather II

michael caine - get carter.

in more recent years joe pesci in Goodfellas.

 
 Posted:   Nov 24, 2013 - 11:13 AM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Naomi Watts in Mulholland Drive. I don't want to go into detail as to why and how this is such a tricky, multi-layered performance (in case anyone here hasn't seen this film yet), but wow! Stunning brilliance.

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Graham: Re: "If that's the case, Ron, then one actor who immediately springs to mind is Nick Nolte. I'd never considered him as a great actor until I saw the admittedly uneven AFTERGLOW. I'm always devastated by the ending, due to the heartrending performances of Nolte, Julie Christie, and the use of Tom Waits growling of the Sondheim/ Bernstein song "Somewhere"...

Then I thought that maybe that was just a one-off piece, a lucky combination of factors hitting the right tone at the right time. But I was genuinely surprised at the sustained brilliance of Nolte's performance in AFFLICTION. That's a great film, and a lot of it is down to Nolte's angst-ridden performance, teetering on the edge of madness, always on the verge of going off the rails - and blaming it all on his toothache!"


Funny, but when I think of "Afterglow," actors who come to mind are Julie Christie and Jonny Lee Miller, and I bought the DVD because of Miller. I'll have to pull it out and watch it again and pay closer attention to Nolte. But he was also pretty good in "The Prince of Tides," although Streisand as director let him go a bit too far over the top! (But what a gorgeous James Newton Howard score!)

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   Christopher Kinsinger   (Member)

There's one brief performance that seems to have been buried and long forgotten, except by me. The underrated Brian Keith gave a marvelously understated performance as Teddy Roosevelt in 1975's The Wind And The Lion. In a film chocked full of wildly whacked-out scene chewing, Keith delivers a quietly thoughtful take on one of our most colorful Presidents. I especially loved the fact that he waits until his final moment onscreen to flash that iconic Roosevelt smile.

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 2:54 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

There's one brief performance that seems to have been buried and long forgotten, except by me. The underrated Brian Keith gave a marvelously understated performance as Teddy Roosevelt in 1975's The Wind And The Lion. In a film chocked full of wildly whacked-out scene chewing, Keith delivers a quietly thoughtful take on one of our most colorful Presidents. I especially loved the fact that he waits until his final moment onscreen to flash that iconic Roosevelt smile.

Christopher -- try to find one of the threads on "The Wind And The Lion" as well as John Barry love themes -- 1 or 2 of them single out Brian Keith's performance as Teddy Roosevelt. I'm looking forward to seeing him in several episodes of my DVD collection of "Centennial." Remember him as Hayley Mill's father (and Maureen O'Hara's ex-husband) in Disney's "Parent Trap"?

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   gone   (Member)

Gary Oldman : Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

I always liked Oldman anyway, but I thought he really delivered in this tremendously under-stated role.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 6:23 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Tyrone Power- Abandon ship-57

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2013 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

gone, re your: Gary Oldman : Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

I always liked Oldman anyway, but I thought he really delivered in this tremendously under-stated role.


I first became aware of Gary Oldman when he played playwright Joe Orton in the 1987 "Prick Up Your Ears," and he was very good. But he has played so many villains since then that it's sometimes hard to separate him from all those baddies. But he was sooooooooooooooo good as the vile villain in "The Contender," and he was one of the producers on that fine film. As for "T,T,S,S" remake, not one of my favorite films.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.