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 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 12:14 AM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

We put it on the CD at the last minute, because people here were going on and on about wanting it.


I think that's pretty neat! Thanks, BK.

Guess we owe it all to lousbasement, and his 2012 "name this tune" thread:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=91282&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   Joe Caps   (Member)

Got my copy yesterday. same things make me tear up in the score as in the film. the music for the old painter in The Last Leaf is awesome.

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 6:02 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Got my copy after returning from my vacation and I enjoy the sound quality and the major themes.

I haven't gotten to go through the CD enough to be sure but I am a bit annoyed by the sequencing of what Christmas tunes I heard in the score. I assume that they were used as major themes so you didn't consider them source music. Based on the track titles, I presume that there are major cues connected with them, which means I will have to permanently remove some of the score from my custom playlist to save myself from the Christmas tunes. It would have been easier if they were alone but what can you do. Going through the samples of the Victor Young now to see if I like what i hear.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 8:39 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Got my copy after returning from my vacation and I enjoy the sound quality and the major themes.

I haven't gotten to go through the CD enough to be sure but I am a bit annoyed by the sequencing of what Christmas tunes I heard in the score. I assume that they were used as major themes so you didn't consider them source music. Based on the track titles, I presume that there are major cues connected with them, which means I will have to permanently remove some of the score from my custom playlist to save myself from the Christmas tunes. It would have been easier if they were alone but what can you do. Going through the samples of the Victor Young now to see if I like what i hear.




Sirusjr, what's not to like about Victor Young? He was a golden age master! smile

 
 Posted:   Mar 15, 2014 - 9:38 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

.

 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 12:08 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2014 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

.

............................



Basil, there is no message on your post. Nothing to say? smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 22, 2014 - 2:46 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

A Bump for Basil, among others...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 4:08 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

and Encore...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2014 - 9:04 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

and Encore...



Preston, per your excellent booklet notes for O. Henry/Irish:

"Christmas in Connecticut" is great, but ...... Christmas in Massachusetts is even better! smile

..... Peter

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 2:52 AM   
 By:   siriami   (Member)

Anyone in the UK still waiting for their copy? Mine still hasn't appeared here. Have emailed Kritzerland re this, but no reply as yet. Hope it's not been lost in the post.........
Alistair

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2014 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   georgefenton   (Member)

Thanks a lot, Bruce!!!! 2 gems in a CD. Alfred Newman is great!!!!! I hope more music of Mr. Newman in Kritzerland very soon.

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2014 - 6:14 PM   
 By:   Olivier   (Member)

Anyone in the UK still waiting for their copy? Mine still hasn't appeared here. Have emailed Kritzerland re this, but no reply as yet. Hope it's not been lost in the post.........
Alistair


Waiting for it in France.
:\

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2014 - 10:30 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Anyone in the UK still waiting for their copy? Mine still hasn't appeared here. Have emailed Kritzerland re this, but no reply as yet. Hope it's not been lost in the post.........
Alistair


Waiting for it in France.
:\


Give it some more time - there's no predicting the USPS and certainly no predicting Europe's postal delivery times and customs holding stuff for no reason.

 
 Posted:   May 21, 2014 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)


Hi Bruce,

Can you let me know if this has been shipped? Thanks. smile

 
 Posted:   May 22, 2014 - 9:17 AM   
 By:   edwzoomom   (Member)


Just got it. Playing it. Love it. Thanks Bruce.

 
 
 Posted:   May 22, 2014 - 8:31 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

Just got it. Playing it. Love it. Thanks Bruce.



I just went back and played my CD again. A very enjoyable CD indeed. smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2015 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Paul Ettinger   (Member)

Well I'm only getting this now more than a year after it was released but it is a gem.
Regarding the notes for LUCK OF THE IRISH , the production was called FOR FEAR OF LITTLE MEN at one time and that was probably due to Irish poet William Allingham's popular poem reprinted in it's entirety below.
Snippits of the poem are often the preface for menacing fairy short stories such as Manly Wade Wellman's FOR FEAR OF LITTLE MEN (1939) , where it'snot only the preface but the title of the story as well. (The little people were not always viewed as harmless Tinkerbell-types.)

However, its title here is a strange apellation as liner note author Preston Neal Jones states as the leprechaun in question is a good-natured and benevolent fellow.

The Fairies
by William Allingham (19 March 1824 – 18 November 1889)

Up the airy mountain
Down the rushy glen,
We dare n't go a-hunting,
For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap,
And white owl's feather.

Down along the rocky shore
Some make their home,
They live on crispy pancakes
Of yellow tide-foam;
Some in the reeds
Of the black mountain-lake,
With frogs for their watch-dogs,
All night awake.

High on the hill-top
The old King sits;
He is now so old and gray
He's nigh lost his wits.
With a bridge of white mist
Columbkill he crosses,
On his stately journeys
From Slieveleague to Rosses;
Or going up with music,
On cold starry nights,
To sup with the Queen,
Of the gay Northern Lights.

They stole little Bridget
For seven years long;
When she came down again
Her friends were all gone.
They took her lightly back
Between the night and morrow;
They thought she was fast asleep,
But she was dead with sorrow.
They have kept her ever since
Deep within the lake,
On a bed of flag leaves,
Watching till she wake.

By the craggy hill-side,
Through the mosses bare,
They have planted thorn trees
For pleasure here and there.
Is any man so daring
As dig them up in spite?
He shall find the thornies set
In his bed at night.

Up the airy mountain
Down the rushy glen,
We dare n't go a-hunting,
For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap,
And white owl's feather.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2015 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Paul, you're on to something. Rest assured, there's no "probably about it." The frontispiece of the original novel by the Joneses quotes the last verse of the Allingham poem, with proper attribution, from "Up the airy mountain," to "And white owl's feather!"

But, my hat is off to you. Although of course I knew about the Jones/Allingham connection in the novel, until you inspired me just now to go a-Googling, I had no idea how many other different books used some form or derivation of FEAR OF LITTLE MEN for their titles. Faith and begorrah!

 
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