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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Friends of Eddie Coyle/Three Days of the Condor
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2012 - 12:07 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Jim Phelps wrote:Is it just me, or does it seem like there are very few '70s film score fans left on this board?

Well I'm still here Jim and I love 60s and 70s scores. I really like 'Three Days Of The Condor', such a great expanded release by FSM.


I hear you, pal. smile I know it sounded like I was complaining (again), but I actually like that the "Seventies Crowd"--as FSM poster Castile once called us--is a rather small contingent here. When a '60 or '70s release is announced I know right away who will chime in (Thomas, Simon Morris, chriss, et al) on those threads. Since the board has lately been dominated with a lot of posters I don't "know", the familiar names are a welcome sight, especially in regards to our shared interest.



Three's a crowd. wink

Alright, we got Coyle, Brown and Scale. Enough for our Seventies robbery! wink

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2012 - 12:27 PM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)



I hear you, pal. smile I know it sounded like I was complaining (again), but I actually like that the "Seventies Crowd"--as FSM poster Castile once called us--is a rather small contingent here. When a '60 or '70s release is announced I know right away who will chime in (Thomas, Simon Morris, chriss, et al) on those threads. Since the board has lately been dominated with a lot of posters I don't "know", the familiar names are a welcome sight, especially in regards to our shared interest.



I think it was Lukas who said a while back that Silver Age scores now sell like Golden Age ones used to, and that Golden Age scores now hardly sold at all. That's a little worrying really.

It's the 'energy' that I like in '70's scores such as TFOEC/TDOTC. They seem to capture something of the time. I'd rather we went back to those smaller, jazz based scores of those times. It won't happen of course, but to me they're more memorable than nearly all the current '100 player plus' orchestral scores that make a lot of noise and fade from the memory like candy floss.

Like the last two Mission: Impossible scores for instance. Sorry, Giacchino fans. Just not for me.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 7:25 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I also noticed that many here who are '70s aficionados tend to be from the UK. Maybe it's because that 1965-75 period had so many memorable "programmes" and those here just happen to be of an age where they grew up during that era. I'm a bit younger than the rest of you :cool but there's enough of an overlap that I was bombarded with the pop culture of just before my own time. "The Womb Theory" continues its undefeated run! wink

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 8:20 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

I also noticed that many here who are '70s aficionados tend to be from the UK. Maybe it's because that 1965-75 period had so many memorable "programmes" and those here just happen to be of an age where they grew up during that era. I'm a bit younger than the rest of you :cool but there's enough of an overlap that I was bombarded with the pop culture of just before my own time. "The Womb Theory" continues its undefeated run! wink



Sounds about right wink

The 70's were just a happier and less complicated time for me. By 1975 I was 13 years old - tv and films here were that much more exciting, often far more escapist, and appealed to me more directly than most of what's around today. After about 1980/1 things went downhill...... big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

I miss that time period very much and thanks God these re-releases enable us nostalgic fellows to transport ourselves back to this fascinating era.

For those who like this cool 60's and 70's sound, check out as well the work of the many italian composers of those days who wrote some great tunes, in particular the "police" movies from the 70's with some groovy scores by Stelvio Cipriani, the De Angelis Brothers, Armando Trovaioli and many others.

Here is the theme from "Blazing Magnums" by Trovaioli which I love, check it out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfNDvwKYQJg

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

I have that CD, reminds me of Isaac Hayes. How about something Schifrin-esque?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 11:38 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

Yes, it's only in the last 2-3 years that I became acquainted with Italian cult film scores. They certainly had the funky 70's bit down to a fine art.

I'd add Franco Micalizzi to the list for sure. Of course, many of these were using American jazz 'n funk as templates for their music in the first place.....

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 12:03 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I should be interested in that Italian stuff, but the sheer amount and my Eddie Coyle-sized budget--see, back on topic--prevents me from doing so. I also like to have at least some familiarity with the films, so that also deters me from investigating more. However, I can appreciate the era in which those films were made. I am obsessed with the early '70s...it's so different from the second half of the decade.

Back to Eddie Coyle again: anyone just love those heist cues? Fantastic!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

I have that CD, reminds me of Isaac Hayes. How about something Schifrin-esque?

Wow, I didn't know that album, I dig it... right down my alley. I'll see if I can order that cd somewhere. Thanks for the lead.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2012 - 5:00 PM   
 By:   samlowry   (Member)

I have that CD, reminds me of Isaac Hayes. How about something Schifrin-esque?

Wow, I didn't know that album, I dig it... right down my alley. I'll see if I can order that cd somewhere. Thanks for the lead.


Ordered! Even though it was 500 limited edition cd from 2009, I found it on Amazon for $16.99

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2012 - 2:49 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)


Back to Eddie Coyle again: anyone just love those heist cues? Fantastic!



Most heist cues in 70's scores are great smile

In Grusin's case, I love the sense of 'spaciousness' in his cues and the use of various percussion. Less is more. If only today's A list composers would remember that now and again.... wink

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2012 - 4:21 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We understood you could get us some machine guns."

Gun Dealer Jackie Brown:
"Hey, look. You—You want to burn your fuckin' bra, all right… but what you're gonna do with a machine gun?"

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We're gonna rob a fuckin' bank."




Gun Dealer Jackie Brown to the two activists:
"Look, I got two problems selling machine guns to people like you.
The first is selling machine guns. That's life in this state.
The second is selling to people like you. You're not honest.
You know where I'm gonna be and what time, I'm liable to lose my machine guns."

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"Give him a thousand dollars, Pete."

 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2012 - 5:41 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hey, Jimbo. Gimme five - cool

Solid.

I tend to see the world through yellow-tinted-glasses--a most '70s worldview. cool

Post edited for decency.

 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2012 - 9:16 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Most heist cues in 70's scores are great smile





Especially when the heist guys look terrifying--almost as terrifying as that woman's Shag hairstyle, that is.



In Grusin's case, I love the sense of 'spaciousness' in his cues and the use of various percussion. Less is more.


The sound quality on the FSM disc is excellent--further showing off what you describe.

 
 Posted:   Jan 14, 2013 - 9:38 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)


Alright, we got Coyle, Brown and Scale. Enough for our Seventies robbery! wink


Can I be Foley?

Or better yet Dillon, who turns out to be the real badass of TFoEC:

"I heard a guy on television the other night, he was talking about pigeons. He called them flying rats. I thought that was pretty good. What he had in mind, he was gonna give 'em the flu or something to make them extinct. Now there was a guy that got shit on, probably got shit on again. Then he got mad. They ruined his suit or somethin'. So he's gonna spend the rest of his life getting even with pigeons cause they ruined a $400 suit. Now there's no percentage in that because there are probably 10 million pigeons in Boston alone all of them laying eggs every day which generally produce more pigeons all dropping tons and tons of shit every day, rain or shine. And this guy in New York, he's gonna...well... There just aren't gonna be any more of them in this world. Yeah, a man gets desperate. He does a few things, he knows it won't work. Pretty soon he quits, packs it all in, goes away someplace. It's the only way there is."

 
 Posted:   May 14, 2013 - 1:26 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Is that a tin can tree being brushed three times at the beginning of TFOEC?

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2014 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Yesterday I watched Three Days of the Condor and while the movie is just as enjoyable as it's always been--John Houseman has the best dialogue--and they really go out of way to portray Redford's Joe Turner character as an oddball/pacifist/non-conformist type. I haven't read the book so I don't know if Redford's portrayal was true to the novel.

Excellent performances from Redford, Max Von Sydow, and the great Cliff Robertson (with his tousled wreck of hair).

As for the music, I don't know if it was the sound mix on Amazon Prime's HD showing of the film but Grusin's music didn't overwhelm the scenes (thankfully) it was in but it was tastefully used throughout. The album is meant to be a straight-ahead take on things--it is a re-record, after all.

 
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