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 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Mine is a serious dip in pitch by at least a quarter tone. I wish it was a simple blend, but it's an electronic mishap...at least on mine. Bummer.

Do record producers no longer listen to their final product before it goes to pressing? I'm sure this sort of thing could easily have been corrected.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Gerhardt never conducted outside the recording studio, which I've always found odd.


It is perhaps a little odd that Gerhardt never did much actual live conducting. Another figure who was successful in the studio but not much in actual performance was Alfred Newman. But Newman, of course, had early pit experience on Broadway. He just preferred the recording studio.

According to Rozsa, Gerhardt was going to make his live conducting debut in Athens. (This was some time after the RCA recording.) The repertoire was to be none other than the RED HOUSE Suite. I don't know if the concert ever took place. In any case it did not seem to lead to a concert career for Gerhardt.

 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 1:02 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Good site re Gerhardt here:

http://www.classicalcdreview.com/CGREBweb.html

Given that he really entered the 'conductor' profession via recording studios, it's not so odd that public conducting never appealed to him. Privacy was an important thing to him, apparently. You could really say that he was THE epitome if a fine conductor, in that he regarded the composers and not the conductors as the true stars of the event. I've always been bemused by the slight pomposity of the career conductors (with numerous fine exceptions like Previn etc.) who expect equal gravitas of artistic kudos to the great composers they're representing ('interpreting'), or for that matter, even the skilled players they're marshalling.

He certainly did very good things for the London orchestras, forming the freelance NPO, which is sadly no more as an ensemble. It was largely due to the greatly increased output of recordings that he engendered that this flexible membership orchestra needed birthing, since the other main London orchestras were all booked up. The NPO was comprised of players mainly from the LSO and RPO etc., in moonlighting mode.

He may well also have concluded that as a recording conductor, live performances could not be perfectionistically controlled. He doesn't seem to have been overly narcissistic, a rarity in career conductors.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

I imagine it's a bit like movie acting vs. stage acting. You can achieve wonderful things on film, but as John Archibald pointed out here, the contributions of director and cameraman are absolutely essential. And you can try and try again -- you only need one perfect take. That's why children and nonprofessionals have given fine screen performances. But on stage you have to do it night after night, creating the entire performance for a new audience each time. That's why so many great actors prefer the stage. And it's why many great conductors do their best work in live performance.

I'm not saying that screen actors or studio performers are amateurs. Far from it. But they certainly don't face quite the same set of challenges as those who direct live performances.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 1, 2010 - 4:23 AM   
 By:   Brian D. Mellies   (Member)

......
There is still the problem of the unreleased music in RCA's vaults (?). "Between Two Worlds" was expanded to include the never-before released "Piano Rhapsody" (which was previously recorded for Readers' Digest and reissued by Varese). Stranger still is the expanded (13:21) suite from "The Fountainhead" which appeared on a cd released by - of all things - the U.S. Post Office to commemorate the release of a series of film composer stamps in 1999.


WOW!! There was something I didn't know. The expanded "Fountainhead". I never bothered to pick up this CD. I didn't know there was anything special on it. My bad.

Fortunately, SAE had a copy of it for sale, and I just picked it up. It also has Tiomkin's "The Thing". How odd. This makes me wonder if perhaps Gerhardt wasn't planning on expanding several of the CDs. There's the Korngold and Waxman, of course. He could easily have added "The Thing" to the Tiomkin disc, and the expanded "Fountainhead" could have made its' way to the Steiner CD.

I may be way wrong, but wasn't this all happening at about the time RCA was being sold to BMG? If so, it could be that BMG dropped the boom on the whole project. As I've said a thousand times, no one can ever explain to me why record companies do the things they do.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2011 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   sherrill50   (Member)

Any chance we can get Sony to release of these in a convenient all-in-one mini-box?

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 6:37 PM   
 By:   Scottie Ferguson   (Member)

Is there any difference between the older editions of these albums and the reissues, particularly with Laura/Forever Amber/The Bad and the Beautiful? I'm looking to buy the Raksin album, but torn between getting the reissue, or sticking with the older release. I wasn't sure if the reissues included better sound or album notes.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 7:21 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

The only one I've bought from the new series, just to test it out, was the Herrmann disc, and the sound is superior on the new one by a wide, wide margin. I'd guess this is true throughout the series, and at some point I will try to replace them all. Liner notes are the same.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 7:27 PM   
 By:   Scottie Ferguson   (Member)

Thanks, SchiffyM. That's really good to know, as I only own the Herrmann and Korngold RCA recordings right now, and look forward to buying more from this series. I'll be going with the reissues.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 9:18 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

All the discs sound much better generally, though a couple of suites (like Treasure of the Sierra Madre for example) have some very noticeable wow right at the start which isn't on the older versions.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 10:59 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

The covers are also worse....but the sound quality makes up for it.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 11:51 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

The covers are also worse....but the sound quality makes up for it.

Honestly, I think every incarnation of these, from LP through CD, has had pretty terrible cover art.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 3:15 AM   
 By:   eggerty31   (Member)

Sorry for digging this thread up from the bowels of FSM but I've just stumbled across these CDs. Knew nothing about them before.

Have picked up The Korngold, Newman, Raksin, Steiner, Bette Davis & Gone with the Wind so far

Wow - these are really wonderful. The sound is excellent as is the performance. With the exception of Gone with the Wind the other discs all feature highlights of other scores but each is a great selection. My favourite so far is the Steiner collection closely followed by the Newman.

The Korngold is also the first Korngold disc I own.

Suffice to say the other 7 discs are now on order. Looking forward to more surprises.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 3:24 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Sorry for digging this thread up from the bowels of FSM but I've just stumbled across these CDs. Knew nothing about them before.

Have picked up The Korngold, Newman, Raksin, Steiner, Bette Davis & Gone with the Wind so far

Wow - these are really wonderful. The sound is excellent as is the performance. With the exception of Gone with the Wind the other discs all feature highlights of other scores but each is a great selection. My favourite so far is the Steiner collection closely followed by the Newman.

The Korngold is also the first Korngold disc I own.

Suffice to say the other 7 discs are now on order. Looking forward to more surprises.



The RCA Series is a great introduction to classic Golden Age film scores. Many of the scores sampled on those discs are available in more complete versions, either as re-recordings or from the original soundtracks. This thread is a handy guide to those expanded recordings:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=55844&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

Any word yet on the Star Wars/Close Encounters or Spectacular World discs?

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

It is a shame that they didn't continue the re-issues after what was put out most recently. I would like to see some more. Perhaps they didn't sell well.

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 6:48 PM   
 By:   Brandon Brown   (Member)

Do the reissues have better sound quality than the original CDs? Or is the quality pretty much the same?

I have a few of the original ones, but if the reissues have better quality, I'd be willing to upgrade.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 7:59 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

It is a shame that they didn't continue the re-issues after what was put out most recently. I would like to see some more. Perhaps they didn't sell well.

???

The only thing missing is the Star Wars/Close Encounter disc and the 'Spectacular World' disc. Neither of those are in the series 'proper'.


Do the reissues have better sound quality than the original CDs? Or is the quality pretty much the same?

I have a few of the original ones, but if the reissues have better quality, I'd be willing to upgrade.


Most certainly better. In general, the sound is more clear, and perhaps a bit....punchier.

 
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