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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: The Busting File: A Musical Comparison by Thomas Rucki
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2012 - 6:52 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

May the Gould Be With You, Always

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=58803&forumID=7&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2012 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   nitzschemorricone   (Member)

I really enjoy older Elliot Gould movies, like Busting; his delivery just grabs you.

Gould was perfect for the early 1970s. By no means the traditional leading man in terms of looks and attitude, he embodied the cynicism and burnt-out feeling the end of the '60s brought about. It's no wonder Gould's star faded by mid decade, though. Poor film choices and changing tastes doomed him to punchline status, but NOT in my house, where he is revered (by me wink)


Gould is revered in my house and amongst my friends and acquaintances. smile He's enjoyed quite a renaissance, at least among the 20, 30, and 40-something cinephiles, critics, and filmmakers I'm friendly with here in New York and on the other coast. Whenever there is a Gould-related screening event here, it is almost always sold out or nearly full of young, hip types. BAM did a Gould retro a few years ago, which was very well-attended, and which included BUSTING (then not on DVD) and other rarities. They just had a special screening of his new film, FRED WON'T MOVE OUT, which was completely sold out. FSLC did a series last year, Hollywood's "Jew Wave," which was, of course, heavy with Gould titles and he was on hand to introduce Bergman's THE TOUCH and do q & a with filmmaking brothers, the Safdies.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2012 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   lexedo   (Member)

I'd like to break bread with JP.

Anytime, pal.


There's a couple of "break bread" type spots in Boca; I'll hit you when I am down next...


Just an FYI: The tab and the intro I did for Track 8 (The Elektra) is in C, which is what Goldenberg uses, but the other discussion centerred on the key of G. I do this when I'm transposing bc I get an extra string, and my positions aren't so weird. Tbh, it doesn't really matter, but for sake of completeness, at least you know my approach - just move everything from the discussion part of the post up by a 4th. I don't have my tune-age w me today, but if I remember, the chorus was something like: Am - Gmaj - Bm (Bdim) - Am | Am - Gmaj - Bm (Bdim), played once, and then back to the intro w the Cm pentatonic that ends on the b5. Again, the guitar solos make this track, and the rhythm supports the guitar by "standing still" and repeating to give Tommy T some room to move around without being interfered with.

Again, sorry for the typos and spelling errors in the OP. Otherwise, what a great thread, and discussion. Busting is really a smoking 70s record for sure.

PS: Don't forget EG is in all the Ocean's movies (11, 12, 13); same delivery - he still cracks me up.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2012 - 4:22 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Gould is revered in my house and amongst my friends and acquaintances. smile He's enjoyed quite a renaissance, at least among the 20, 30, and 40-something cinephiles, critics, and filmmakers I'm friendly with here in New York and on the other coast. Whenever there is a Gould-related screening event here, it is almost always sold out or nearly full of young, hip types. BAM did a Gould retro a few years ago, which was very well-attended, and which included BUSTING (then not on DVD) and other rarities. They just had a special screening of his new film, FRED WON'T MOVE OUT, which was completely sold out. FSLC did a series last year, Hollywood's "Jew Wave," which was, of course, heavy with Gould titles and he was on hand to introduce Bergman's THE TOUCH and do q & a with filmmaking brothers, the Safdies.

A Gould renaissance? That's good to know! Maybe people from that age group--myself included at the tail end of it--see Elliot Gould as a refreshing change from the kind of actor we grew up watching. He's as unlike Harrison Ford as one can get--thank god. For me personally, I was intrigued by his best work because I just didn't accept him as some kind of fluke actor of a bygone era. The film that sold me on him once and for all was The Silent Partner (1978), a gritty little Noir. Busting is a favorite, of course and even The Long Goodbye, which I don't like as a Philip Marlowe movie but I do like for Gould's performance.

There's a couple of "break bread" type spots in Boca; I'll hit you when I am down next...

Sure thing.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2012 - 3:35 PM   
 By:   nitzschemorricone   (Member)

SILENT PARTNER is a gem, I agree. A longtime personal favorite of mine. That was already at the point when Gould had dropped from the A-list, hence his headlining a small Canadian tax shelter picture, albeit with some other topnotch talent in the form of Christopher Plummer and Susannah York, as well as a pre-fame John Candy. For me, it's actors of my generation (40s and under)--who mostly remind me of would-be models--that really pale in comparison to the likes of Gould. Ford, I like, though I would certainly agree that he's a different flavor than Gould. Interestingly, Ford appeared in a small role in the Gould vehicle GETTING STRAIGHT, from STUNTMAN director Richard Rush.

A Gould renaissance? That's good to know! Maybe people from that age group--myself included at the tail end of it--see Elliot Gould as a refreshing change from the kind of actor we grew up watching. He's as unlike Harrison Ford as one can get--thank god. For me personally, I was intrigued by his best work because I just didn't accept him as some kind of fluke actor of a bygone era. The film that sold me on him once and for all was The Silent partner (1978), a gritty little Noir. Busting is a favorite, of course and even The Long Goodbye, which I don't like as a Philip Marlowe movie but I do like for Gould's performance.

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2012 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Please enter the crummy apartment of Officer Keneely after a hard day.



It's nicer than the dump that Robert Ryan called "home" in On Dangerous Ground! I think Popeye Doyle lived in a veritable rat hole too, when he had that "broad" over to his place.

I love this thread. Just a few guys standing around talkin' about Elliot Gould. I'm paraphrasing a quote from many years ago when the subject we were standing around talking about was Joe Pepitone. Loook him up, kids and Europeans. wink

Sorry about that--no I'm not--but digression is always nine-tenths the law around these '70s topics. cool

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 30, 2012 - 1:24 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Please enter the crummy apartment of Officer Keneely after a hard day.



It's nicer than the dump that Robert Ryan called "home" in On Dangerous Ground! I think Popeye Doyle lived in a veritable rat hole too, when he had that "broad" over to his place.

I love this thread. Just a few guys standing around talkin' about Elliot Gould. I'm paraphrasing a quote from many years ago when the subject we were standing around talking about was Joe Pepitone. Loook him up, kids and Europeans. wink

Sorry about that--no I'm not--but digression is always nine-tenths the law around these '70s topics. cool



“We just gotta stay alive, man.”
—Detective Keneely to Farrel in the car after the beating.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2012 - 2:37 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Enter the Tavern!





_____________
"Hello Mr. Sink, Mr. Soap. Hello Urinals. Are you doing Killroy? Ahhh, a bunch of toilet seats!
It's like my office. Mr. President!"
—Ironic detective Keneely entering and visting the public toilet of a park.

 
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