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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Getaway: The Unused Score
 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2009 - 12:34 PM   
 By:   Miguel Rojo   (Member)

so founder members of the I like both Getaways club. Lets convene our first meeting!!

 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2009 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I never had any problem with Jones' score, I like Doc and Carol's theme. Of course, it was all I ever knew since I first saw it theatrically in high school until the Fielding score surfaced- I think I would prefer Fieldings if I saw it with the movie.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 10, 2009 - 12:38 AM   
 By:   ThomasCrown76   (Member)

I like the one with Kim Basinger. Thanks for the mammaries.

 
 Posted:   Nov 12, 2009 - 8:04 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

From the Getaway documentary DVD:

Katy Haber: "Jerry threw a chair at Sam, or was it vice versa?"

Camille Fielding: "Jerry threw the chair at Sam."
----------------

Can you say "volatile"? LOL

I don't think Williams threw a chair at Spielberg or Lucas on the worst day they ever lived.

 
 Posted:   Nov 19, 2009 - 7:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

so founder members of the I like both Getaways club. Lets convene our first meeting!!

I can understand McQueen's replacing Jerry's score. Both he and Peckinpah were under enormous pressure to make The Getaway a big hit. Quincy Jones had the commercial credentials and his "hipper" music was more accessible than Fielding's cool, arty style. I still hear flourishes of Fielding's style in Jones' score, especially during the bank robbery sequence. And what can you say about the great Toots Thielemans? I swear there are moments in The Getaway where his harmonica sounds like Astor Piazzolla's bandoneĆ³n. It's downright bee-yoo-tee-full.

And IMO Slim Pickens robs the scene he's in. He also managed to get $30,000 out of Doc and Carol over the original offer of ten grand. wink

And speaking of Peckinpah, I just realized that every one of his films (at least up to "Alfredo Garcia") is a character study. All of them! (hey, I'm slow on the uptake, so bear with me).

 
 Posted:   Nov 25, 2009 - 7:53 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

I got the Blu-Ray release of the film today, and it was fascinatiing to hear and see Fielding's score in context. While I have nothing against the more "hip" Quincy Jones" score, Fielding's score really juices up the moments of tension and violence in a way that Jones didn't even try. I need to pick up the FSM CD someday. While the sound quality on the iso score track is great, I'm still waiting for the day when an iso track will offer chapter indexing for the score cues. frown

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 3:35 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The original version of The Getaway, of course, crushes the insipid 1994 remake. The one scene that shows this to be true is the part where Baldwin, Basinger, Madsen, and Seymour-Hoffman are going over the robbery details. Missing from the '94 film is all of the tension, pacing, and meaningful pauses that made the Peckinpah version of the scene so great.

In the earlier film, we know from that scene that Doc (McQueen) and Rudy (Al Lettieri) do not get along. When Lettieri shines the flashlight in Doc and Carol's face followed by McQueen's loading of his handgun which compels Lettieri to immediately turn off the light is nothing short of brilliant. We know more about Lettieri's Rudy than we'd ever know from Madsen's dopey take on the role twenty plus years later. The 1994 version plays the scene almost exactly the same except it's rushed and strictly by-the-numbers. No tension, no insight into characters, nothing.

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 3:43 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

The original version of The Getaway, of course, crushes the insipid 1994 remake.


It's almost funny to even say it. The remake was a glossy joke, just horrible. I'd say the score was probably horrible but the whole damned stupid mess just slid out of my memory after about an hour.

THE GETAWAY isn't my favorite Peckinpah, and I expected a whole lot more from a Peckinpah adaptation of Jim Thompson. That Peckinpah didn't go with the ending shows that at heart "Bloody Sam" wasn't as pitiless as he'd like everyone to believe, or that McQueen swung too hard to keep up his heroic winner image. A missed opportunity, though like KILLER ELITE it's a big ol' mess I really like for its moments of grit and because it's Peckinpah.

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 4:04 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The original version of The Getaway, of course, crushes the insipid 1994 remake.


It's almost funny to even say it. The remake was a glossy joke, just horrible. I'd say the score was probably horrible but the whole damned stupid mess just slid out of my memory after about an hour.

THE GETAWAY isn't my favorite Peckinpah, and I expected a whole lot more from a Peckinpah adaptation of Jim Thompson. That Peckinpah didn't go with the ending shows that at heart "Bloody Sam" wasn't as pitiless as he'd like everyone to believe, or that McQueen swung too hard to keep up his heroic winner image. A missed opportunity, though like KILLER ELITE it's a big ol' mess I really like for its moments of grit and because it's Peckinpah.


That's why I felt the need to add the "of course" to that sentence. wink

The whole film reeks of compromise and McQueen meddling, but even flawed Peckinpah--I reckon all Sam is "flawed"--makes it a worthwhile endeavor for this viewer.

Don't think we'll see anything akin to the MacGraw "bitch slap" or Struthers "punch out" in films these days. wink The '94 remake didn't have the balls to do that, despite all the hype we read around here about how much "edgier" and "intense" 1990s and on movies are alleged to be.

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 4:10 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

Edgy and Intense Yesterday = Susan George in STRAW DOGS, Ken Russell's THE DEVILS, John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands' A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE, Kubrick's CLOCKWORK ORANGE


Edgy and Intense Today = "James Bond's gonna be BORED in this one!", Quentin Tarantino using old non-hit songs on the soundtrack, a white comic book character played by a black actor

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 4:18 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

"Have you seen Ruuuuudy?"
"No, I aint seen Rudy, ya dumb broad!"

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

"Superior technology, my ass!"
The Beacon City dentist after a power cut.

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 8:56 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Two boxes of double-ought buck."

"Gonna knock down a wall?"

 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

The original version of The Getaway, of course, crushes the insipid 1994 remake. The one scene that shows this to be true is the part where Baldwin, Basinger, Madsen, and Seymour-Hoffman are going over the robbery details. Missing from the '94 film is all of the tension, pacing, and meaningful pauses that made the Peckinpah version of the scene so great.

Uh, I believe what you mean, in a word is, 'subtlety.'

 
 
 Posted:   May 18, 2012 - 10:23 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

Grecchus,

If there's one word I don't use when describing Peckinpah, it's 'subtle'. big grin

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2012 - 4:14 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Uh, I believe what you mean, in a word is, 'subtlety.'

You don't tell the Thomas Wolfe of the FSM board to use just one word, baby! cool

How 'bout just discussing the score(s) and the film for a change? It's refreshing! wink

That's also one helluva stutter ya got there, Grecchus, if it shows up when you type...big grin

 
 
 Posted:   May 19, 2012 - 4:17 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

the Thomas Wolfe of the FSM board


I thought you were the Fran Lebowitz of the FSM board?

 
 Posted:   May 19, 2012 - 4:20 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

the Thomas Wolfe of the FSM board


I thought you were the Fran Lebowitz of the FSM board?


My influences run the gamut from A to B...

EDIT: I take the Lebowitz remark as a great compliment.

 
 
 Posted:   May 19, 2012 - 4:22 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)


My influences run the gamut from A to B...



Which puts you ahead of 97% of people here, whose influences run the gamut from Roddenberry to Spielberg.

 
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