Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2009 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

I find it really weird how Tony Scott film scores were so engaging, catchy, often thematic and (as is the case here) artful in the 1980s. I don't think I am alone when I say I could never sit through a score to one of his 1990s/2000s films on CD (and I find them barely servicable in his movies). Kamen's Last Boyscout might be the exception here, as well as parts of Crimson Tide, whicxh plays to my ears as a hilarious McDonald's Happy Meal parody of Doldinger's Das Boot and Poledouris' Red October. Maybe Revenge as well?

Artful, intelligent and dark ambient/avant guarde droning from synth pioneers Rubini and Jaeger on The Hunger. Some very competently arranged Schubert (also used in Barry Lyndon, which the Hunger seems rather indebted to visually as well), supervised on this film by Howard Blake. I wonder why the Scott Brothers didn't just have Blake orchestrate classical music for the scores of their movies since? I wonder why the Blake association disappeared so quickly after this and The Duellists.

How did Jaeger and Rubini become involved with The Hunger, and why have they not scored any other Scott movies? As far as avant guarde, ambient scores go I think they excelled at this genre. It's also a really arty score; almost like a late Kubrick film (and again you wonder about the aspirations with the adapted Schubert also used in Lyndon too).

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2009 - 1:02 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I find it really weird how Tony Scott film scores were so engaging, catchy, often thematic and (as is the case here) artful in the 1980s. I don't think I am alone when I say I could never sit through a score to one of his 1990s/2000s films on CD (and I find them barely servicable in his movies). Kamen's Last Boyscout might be the exception here, as well as parts of Crimson Tide, whicxh plays to my ears as a hilarious McDonald's Happy Meal parody of Doldinger's Das Boot and Poledouris' Red October. Maybe Revenge as well?

Artful, intelligent and dark ambient/avant guarde droning from synth pioneers Rubini and Jaeger on The Hunger. Some very competently arranged Schubert (also used in Barry Lyndon, which the Hunger seems rather indebted to visually as well), supervised on this film by Howard Blake. I wonder why the Scott Brothers didn't just have Blake orchestrate classical music for the scores of their movies since? I wonder why the Blake association disappeared so quickly after this and The Duellists.

How did Jaeger and Rubini become involved with The Hunger, and why have they not scored any other Scott movies? As far as avant guarde, ambient scores go I think they excelled at this genre. It's also a really arty score; almost like a late Kubrick film (and again you wonder about the aspirations with the adapted Schubert also used in Lyndon too).


I probably don't have to say that I disagree concerning Scott in the 90s/00s. Days Of Thunder, Crimson Tide, The Fan and Enemy Of The State are top-notch scores, Revenge, True Romance and Spy Game are good too. Man On Fire and Last Boy Scout aren't too good and the other ones I'm not familiar with.

I also have to remind you that there were lots of synths in the last 30 minutes of Hunt For Red October.

I have not seen/heard The Hunger, and I'm not familiar with Jaeger at all, but I love what Rubini did in Manhunter.

To have Howard Blake "orchestrate classical music for the Scott brothers since" would surely have been highly unwanted, at least for this listener!!

Jaeger hardly wrote anything after The Hunger, and Rubini went to TV land after Manhunter, so no wonder why Tony Scott didn't hire them again. Already in 1986, Harold Faltermeyer was a far bigger name, so I doubt Scott considered Rubini for Top Gun.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2009 - 1:09 PM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)


I also have to remind you that there were lots of synths in the last 30 minutes of Hunt For Red October.


No you don't have to remind me- did I claim otherwise?

I think the Boddicker synths in RED OCTOBER are a world apart from Zimmer's CRIMSON TIDE. Likewise Doldinger's synth DAS BOOT. CRIMSON TIDE to me sounds like a more watered down, "power anthemed" approximation of those two landmark submarine movie scores.

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2009 - 1:18 PM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Ooohhh... brutal... :-D

I saw Hunt For Red October only a couple of weeks ago, and I found the synth stuff rather cheap-sounding and demo-like, almost like they ran out of money for an orchestra to score the last 30 minutes of the film. On the other hand, it was of course quite refreshing to hear synths instead of the old-fashioned orchestra.

 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2009 - 11:52 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

bump

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2009 - 12:31 PM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

I have a cousin who lives and works in Italy and she is living together with an Italian. When I met him and told him that I am a film music fan/soundtrack collector he asked me if I had the soundtrack to this Tony Scott movie because he liked that so much and had been looking for it for ages. I do not own a soundtrack to this film so that meant that I unfortunately could not help him out. However I did manage to make him happy when I changed the subject and started to talk about Pino Donaggio who he also liked (back then I did only own one Donaggio soundtrack and that was Raising Cain). My cousin and her boyfriend said that they often use film music when they work out at the local gym, that made me happy because whenever someone who usually don`t listen to film music starts to appreciate film music I just have to smile.

 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2009 - 3:20 PM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

I have a question about the release of this score that i've always wanted cleared up.
I was a big fan at the time the film came out and bought the Varese album. The composed music on the album differed somewhat to what was heard in the film (the beach house scene/ Sarah's panic etc..) I know this often happens but the soundtrack was also brought out on the Milan label and weirdly some of the track titles and timings stated were different from the Varese one. Unfortunately on buying it, it was exactly the same album as the Varese release. How come the stated track titles and timings differed though....and why wasn't the tracks in the film used any way? Did some other composer come in at a later stage and rescore? It sure sound the same kinda stuff. Just curious. Still love the album.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2009 - 3:50 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Ooohhh... brutal... :-D

I saw Hunt For Red October only a couple of weeks ago, and I found the synth stuff rather cheap-sounding and demo-like, almost like they ran out of money for an orchestra to score the last 30 minutes of the film. On the other hand, it was of course quite refreshing to hear synths instead of the old-fashioned orchestra.



Really? Cheap and demo sounding? And Faltermeyer is aces ?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 13, 2009 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   Paul MacLean   (Member)

I also have to remind you that there were lots of synths in the last 30 minutes of Hunt For Red October.

The real reason for this is because the studio didn't want to pay for another orchestra session, so Basil had to record the remaining cues electronically.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 6:19 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

Looks like Freshy was right!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 8:43 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Looks like Freshy was right!

Correct in that the budget demanded electronics, but, not so much in the "cheap demo sounding" part.

 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Looks like Freshy was right!

Aint I always...

 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

Ooohhh... brutal... :-D

I saw Hunt For Red October only a couple of weeks ago, and I found the synth stuff rather cheap-sounding and demo-like, almost like they ran out of money for an orchestra to score the last 30 minutes of the film. On the other hand, it was of course quite refreshing to hear synths instead of the old-fashioned orchestra.



Really? Cheap and demo sounding? And Faltermeyer is aces ?


I didn't say it was bad. But I don't think it had the power and energy of a Faltermeyer score.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   ahem   (Member)

I thought Poledouris and Michael Boddicker together was a match made in Heaven. Robocop 3 is also mindblowingly awesome; the Eastern motifs are gorgeous.

 
 Posted:   Dec 14, 2009 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   Mr Drive   (Member)

I wonder why the Scott Brothers didn't just have Blake orchestrate classical music for the scores of their movies since? I wonder why the Blake association disappeared so quickly after this and The Duellists.

Wasn't Blake considered for Alien? I think I read that somewhere.

 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2009 - 3:24 AM   
 By:   Guenther K   (Member)


Wasn't Blake considered for Alien? I think I read that somewhere.


Yes, but Lionel Newman insisted on Goldsmith.

 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2009 - 2:06 PM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

I have a question about the release of this score that i've always wanted cleared up.
I was a big fan at the time the film came out and bought the Varese album. The composed music on the album differed somewhat to what was heard in the film (the beach house scene/ Sarah's panic etc..) I know this often happens but the soundtrack was also brought out on the Milan label and weirdly some of the track titles and timings stated were different from the Varese one. Unfortunately on buying it, it was exactly the same album as the Varese release. How come the stated track titles and timings differed though....and why wasn't the tracks in the film used any way? Did some other composer come in at a later stage and rescore? It sure sound the same kinda stuff. Just curious. Still love the album.


No joy with any answers to this?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2009 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

Does it help I always wondered the same thing? Avast, no one cared for
my ? either frown

I wish the Bauhaus song, the Iggy Pop song, and the 'used' score made it
to the record - it's an MGM, and licensing notwithstanding, maybe in 2015
LaLaLand will 'ave a go at this one?

Rubini did some really great work on MANHUNTER, with 'The Reds' (????)
'Graham's Theme' still levels this child of the 80's, easily one of my all time
favorite compositions.

 
 Posted:   Dec 17, 2009 - 1:18 AM   
 By:   spook   (Member)

Does it help I always wondered the same thing? Avast, no one cared for
my ? either frown

I wish the Bauhaus song, the Iggy Pop song, and the 'used' score made it
to the record - it's an MGM, and licensing notwithstanding, maybe in 2015
LaLaLand will 'ave a go at this one?

Rubini did some really great work on MANHUNTER, with 'The Reds' (????)
'Graham's Theme' still levels this child of the 80's, easily one of my all time
favorite compositions.


Thanks for chipping in mate. Its weird isn't it. Still wonder if it was a last minute rescoring job.

 
 Posted:   Dec 26, 2009 - 2:39 AM   
 By:   Luke1981   (Member)

I absolutely love the Trio rearranged by Howard Blake. Isn't he a prolific composer, too? I also wondered about the CD and the music that was on it. I would love the see a release of the score and songs which actually are in the movie.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.