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 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 9:34 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I've always believed that Joe Mannix was the private investigator who represented the "Silent Majority" during the tumultuous late Sixties and early Seventies, as he imo reflected their beliefs, concerns, and represented the way the "Greatest Generation" would hope to be. Joe was straight and narrow in that he worked closely with the police, never broke the law, yet had a fierce sense of independence, which was something that used to be commonplace in the American character. Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.


Right on! Keep moving! Can you dig it? Groovy, maaaan!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 12:21 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've started on a Mannix rewatch of all eight seasons program. Season one shows a Joe Mannix who is a lot tougher and more Mike Hammer-like in his attitude; something that would soften considerably in subsequent seasons. Mannix is still caring and compassionate, but he's a lot quicker to crack wise and get into a scrape than he would in future seasons (whch was still a LOT).

I've lost track of the number of times he is talking with an unlit cigarette bouncing up and down in his yap. Mannix smokes almost constantly.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 4:09 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.

He was a man ahead of his time. With all we know now about the counter culture, it has to be admitted that it was a lot of tearing down and very little building up. Mostly it was a lot of white posers being "principled" whilst using up the wealth gathered by their parents' and grand parents' hard work and endurance. And what's worse: history is repeating itself on Universities where the PC-facismo is making it's ugly presence felt.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2015 - 3:36 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.

He was a man ahead of his time. With all we know now about the counter culture, it has to be admitted that it was a lot of tearing down and very little building up. Mostly it was a lot of white posers being "principled" whilst using up the wealth gathered by their parents' and grand parents' hard work and endurance. And what's worse: history is repeating itself on Universities where the PC-facismo is making it's ugly presence felt.

D.S.


That's probably a discussion for another (most likely forbidden) thread, but we are in agreement here. smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2016 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Special thanks to Google for enabling me to find this thread--NO thanks to the FSM search engine.

I'm making my way through the entirety of Mannix and am near the end of season two. Last night was the series' first bonafide classic episode, "End Game." Not only does it introduce the repeated Mannix trope of an ex-Korean War "buddy" out for revenge, it introduces Joe Mannix's on-the-force buddy, the unintentionally(?) brilliantly funny Art Malcolm (played to perfcion by Ward Wood).

Anyway, the writing is good throughout "End Game", with Steve Ihnat's psycho Gus Keller character getting tons of ace dialogue, even stuff like "That was kinda too bad--he got himslf shot; .45 automatic" and "Chang Ju, the North Korean Boys Town." Not just the words themselves but the delivery by Steve Ihnat, a hero to many a '65-'75 film and tv buff.

Good direction from John Moxey. The memorable script is by Cliff Gould. It's also an impressive-looking set. Nice atmospheric score from the great Richard Markowitz.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2016 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

By all means try to outrun a car. Apparently the Chrysler corp. wanted to show off its Plymouth Superbee so badly they gave it too the bad guys.



Chrysler designed such jaw droppingly beautiful cars in the 60s.

D.S.


The Super Bee was a Dodge, not a Plymouth, whose second performance model was the GTX (followed by the Sport Satellite).

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2016 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Season two's "All Around the Money Tree" is the closest thing that passes for a Mannix "comedy episode" we've seen thus far and perhaps during the series' entire run. The light tone comes from the performance of lovable scalawag Roger Bard (Christopher Cary) who apparently is in possession of several million £££ that was earmarked for incineration. Mannix and a group of dopes go on a wild goose chase in the desert with Mannix and company being double crossed and playing everyone against everyone else. Thankfully there isn't a "wacky" score and the episode comes off much better as a result of this and the witty banter and plot twists.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Season two's "All Around the Money Tree" is the closest thing that passes for a Mannix "comedy episode" we've seen thus far and perhaps during the series' entire run. The light tone comes from the performance of lovable scalawag Roger Bard (Christopher Cary) who apparently is in possession of several million £££ that was earmarked for incineration. Mannix and a group of dopes go on a wild goose chase in the desert with Mannix and company being double crossed and playing everyone against everyone else. Thankfully there isn't a "wacky" score and the episode comes off much better as a result of this and the witty banter and plot twists.




I'm currently watching again my season 6 set.
I'm watching the episodes with stock music because I wish to track down the use of the scores.
I'm into "Portrait of a Hero". I'm lucky because my favorite cop work with Joe: Lt. Tobias!

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 8:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'd like to speed up my Mannix viewing gecause at my current rate it will be a few years before I arrive at season six. I like those last three seasons best because there's less Paramount lot stuff and a lot more location filming. How many San Francisco episodes are there, two? Great episodes.

I also like how it's "Greatest Generation" Joe Mannix making his way through the vastly different world that is the early '70s. At the risk of sounding like Jo Ann Paul wink, Mannix is the everyman representing the hopes, fears, and concerns of the World War II generation.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 9:22 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I'd like to speed up my Mannix viewing gecause at my current rate it will be a few years before I arrive at season six. I like those last three seasons best because there's less Paramount lot stuff and a lot more location filming. How many San Francisco episodes are there, two? Great episodes.

I also like how it's "Greatest Generation" Joe Mannix making his way through the vastly different world that is the early '70s. At the risk of sounding like Jo Ann Paul wink, Mannix is the everyman representing the hopes, fears, and concerns of the World War II generation.



Mannix is a Korean war veteran: a classic 1950's man into the 1970's.
Actor Clint Eastwood has the same profile but he didn't go to Korea.


KOREAN WAR NOTES ABOUT SEASON 6
A reference to a former soldier helping blind veterans for the Sightseers Society occurs in “Cry Silence”. In “Harvest of Death”, Mannix is hired by a veteran pal named Dave Winters (actor Paul Mantee who previously played a veteran in “A Ticket to the Eclipse”) to investigate and posing as a crop duster. “The Man Who Wasn’t There” is a mixture of two previous Korean war soldier characters: Gus Keller from the season 2 “End Game” (who toys with explosives) and Mark from the season 4 “A Ticket to the Eclipse” (who threatens Peggy Fair).

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 2:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Yes, Mannix is a Korean War veteran who led a squad of psychopaths who make the Dirty Dozen look like the Bowery Boys, wink but his cultural and moral frame of reference is imo clearly the "Silent Majority." Besdes, there's only five years between WWII and the Korean War. smile

Speaking of those psychos, there was one about every other season, wasn't there? The last one had Clu Gulager playing the latest nutjob. I wonder if the producers even knew they were retellng the same story every two years or maybe it was just an inside joke being played on the audience? Those episodes are among my favorites but they were always played so gloriously over the top!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 2:52 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Yes, Mannix is a Korean War veteran who led a squad of psychopaths who make the Dirty Dozen look like the Bowery Boys, wink but his cultural and moral frame of reference is imo clearly the "Silent Majority." Besdes, there's only five years between WWII and the Korean War. smile

Speaking of those psychos, there was one about every other season, wasn't there? The last one had Clu Gulager playing the latest nutjob. I wonder if the producers even knew they were retellng the same story every two years or maybe it was just an inside joke being played on the audience? Those episodes are among my favorites but they were always played so gloriously over the top!



The three Korean war veterans were played by good performers:
Steve Ihnat
Darren McGavin
Clu Gulager

They anticipated a character like Rambo.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 3:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

What about Joseph Sirola's Harry Bennett character ("A Word Called Courage") from season eight? I believe he played a part setting up Mannix though I've only seen that episode once.

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 2:28 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)



Mike Connors, 1925-2017

So long, Mike...but Joe Mannix lives on...

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

(Original Airdate: January 23, 1971): Tough L.A. police Lt. Ira Deegan is warned off the investigation of a heist that netted $85,000 -- a threat that seems to have come true when his garage is blown up, although no one is hurt. Joe Mannix begins investigating the theft, which he claims is for the $8,500 recovery fee offered by the insurance company that would have to pay off on the theft. But Mannix' client is actually someone who is worried about Deegan's safety --his wife.

Good performances from Dane Clark as Ira Deegan and Joan Hotchkis as his wife, Evelyn. This is the third and final appearance of the Ira Deegan character, who was always used for the more intense episodes. Deegan and Mannix do not get along and Deegan's tightly-wound personality means that scenes between he and Mannix are always tense. Deegan is always about ready to explode in a white-hot rage. Too bad the character wasn't brought back for future seasons.

Art Malcolm is also here, and he claims to not like Deegan very much, either.

Joan Hotchkis is fantastic as Deegan's long-suffering but strong wife. She looks damned good in the scene when she wears a turtleneck sweater. Otherwise, she is dressed like the typical middle-aged housewife, but there's a strength to her character that shatters the stereotypical portrayal one often sees in this era. Despite being the early '70s, Mannix belongs to the America of the 1960s in both attitude and in its adherence to the Paramont lot and other sets.

Peggy wears a putrid burnt orange jumpsuit over a crazy-patterned red, white, and blue blouse. Despite this early '70s fashion tragedy, Gail Fisher still manages to look great as always. smile

Mannix is hit by a car and as he's being taken to the hospital in a station wagon ambulance (in a tightly-photographed shot), he acts like a jerk to the ambulance attendant and forces them to let him out.

When it's revealed that Deegan's young partner is part of the scheme for the robbery money, Mannix stops him in a quick but brutal fight. Deegan is disgusted by his partner's actions, and when Mannix tells him to "say hello to your wife", Deegan, realizing he has a lot of mending to do, chokes back tears and leaves. 8/10

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 9:36 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)


Mannix Tributes
http://tinyurl.com/jzllwv9

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


Mannix Tributes
http://tinyurl.com/jzllwv9


You just love that scene and its fine Fielding score, don't you?

I watch Mannix every Tuesday night, and have just one more episode to watch in my re-watch of season four. Many episodes are tracked with Fielding scores, but the credits only list Lalo Schifrin's theme in the music aspect. As you know, (member), Mrs. Phelps is a big fan of Mannix, and because of this and our numerous viewings of Kolchak, she knows The Fielding Sound quite well.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 10:27 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)


Mannix Tributes
http://tinyurl.com/jzllwv9


You just love that scene and its fine Fielding score, don't you?

I watch Mannix every Tuesday night, and have just one more episode to watch in my re-watch of season four. Many episodes are tracked with Fielding scores, but the credits only list Lalo Schifrin's theme in the music aspect. As you know, (member), Mrs. Phelps is a big fan of Mannix, and because of this and our numerous viewings of Kolchak, she knows The Fielding Sound quite well.


Give my regards to Mrs. Phelps! I remember she likes the dashing Jon Pertwee as Doctor Who too.

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2017 - 11:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Thank you, I will! She is indeed an enthisiastic Pertwee-era fan. She knows the series well and we have just about every DVD of his run on the series. We still talk anout the great time we had meeting you over dinner when we visited the great city of Paris in 2012.

 
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