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 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 9:34 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I've always believed that Joe Mannix was the private investigator who represented the "Silent Majority" during the tumultuous late Sixties and early Seventies, as he imo reflected their beliefs, concerns, and represented the way the "Greatest Generation" would hope to be. Joe was straight and narrow in that he worked closely with the police, never broke the law, yet had a fierce sense of independence, which was something that used to be commonplace in the American character. Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.


Right on! Keep moving! Can you dig it? Groovy, maaaan!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 9:52 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 12:21 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've started on a Mannix rewatch of all eight seasons program. Season one shows a Joe Mannix who is a lot tougher and more Mike Hammer-like in his attitude; something that would soften considerably in subsequent seasons. Mannix is still caring and compassionate, but he's a lot quicker to crack wise and get into a scrape than he would in future seasons (whch was still a LOT).

I've lost track of the number of times he is talking with an unlit cigarette bouncing up and down in his yap. Mannix smokes almost constantly.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 6, 2015 - 4:09 PM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)

Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.

He was a man ahead of his time. With all we know now about the counter culture, it has to be admitted that it was a lot of tearing down and very little building up. Mostly it was a lot of white posers being "principled" whilst using up the wealth gathered by their parents' and grand parents' hard work and endurance. And what's worse: history is repeating itself on Universities where the PC-facismo is making it's ugly presence felt.

D.S.

 
 Posted:   Dec 8, 2015 - 3:36 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Mannix also saw the Counterculture in a balanced, if not completely sympathetic way.

He was a man ahead of his time. With all we know now about the counter culture, it has to be admitted that it was a lot of tearing down and very little building up. Mostly it was a lot of white posers being "principled" whilst using up the wealth gathered by their parents' and grand parents' hard work and endurance. And what's worse: history is repeating itself on Universities where the PC-facismo is making it's ugly presence felt.

D.S.


That's probably a discussion for another (most likely forbidden) thread, but we are in agreement here. smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2016 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Special thanks to Google for enabling me to find this thread--NO thanks to the FSM search engine.

I'm making my way through the entirety of Mannix and am near the end of season two. Last night was the series' first bonafide classic episode, "End Game." Not only does it introduce the repeated Mannix trope of an ex-Korean War "buddy" out for revenge, it introduces Joe Mannix's on-the-force buddy, the unintentionally(?) brilliantly funny Art Malcolm (played to perfcion by Ward Wood).

Anyway, the writing is good throughout "End Game", with Steve Ihnat's psycho Gus Keller character getting tons of ace dialogue, even stuff like "That was kinda too bad--he got himslf shot; .45 automatic" and "Chang Ju, the North Korean Boys Town." Not just the words themselves but the delivery by Steve Ihnat, a hero to many a '65-'75 film and tv buff.

Good direction from John Moxey. The memorable script is by Cliff Gould. It's also an impressive-looking set. Nice atmospheric score from the great Richard Markowitz.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 6, 2016 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

By all means try to outrun a car. Apparently the Chrysler corp. wanted to show off its Plymouth Superbee so badly they gave it too the bad guys.



Chrysler designed such jaw droppingly beautiful cars in the 60s.

D.S.


The Super Bee was a Dodge, not a Plymouth, whose second performance model was the GTX (followed by the Sport Satellite).

 
 Posted:   Jul 7, 2016 - 2:37 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Season two's "All Around the Money Tree" is the closest thing that passes for a Mannix "comedy episode" we've seen thus far and perhaps during the series' entire run. The light tone comes from the performance of lovable scalawag Roger Bard (Christopher Cary) who apparently is in possession of several million £££ that was earmarked for incineration. Mannix and a group of dopes go on a wild goose chase in the desert with Mannix and company being double crossed and playing everyone against everyone else. Thankfully there isn't a "wacky" score and the episode comes off much better as a result of this and the witty banter and plot twists.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Season two's "All Around the Money Tree" is the closest thing that passes for a Mannix "comedy episode" we've seen thus far and perhaps during the series' entire run. The light tone comes from the performance of lovable scalawag Roger Bard (Christopher Cary) who apparently is in possession of several million £££ that was earmarked for incineration. Mannix and a group of dopes go on a wild goose chase in the desert with Mannix and company being double crossed and playing everyone against everyone else. Thankfully there isn't a "wacky" score and the episode comes off much better as a result of this and the witty banter and plot twists.




I'm currently watching again my season 6 set.
I'm watching the episodes with stock music because I wish to track down the use of the scores.
I'm into "Portrait of a Hero". I'm lucky because my favorite cop work with Joe: Lt. Tobias!

 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 8:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'd like to speed up my Mannix viewing gecause at my current rate it will be a few years before I arrive at season six. I like those last three seasons best because there's less Paramount lot stuff and a lot more location filming. How many San Francisco episodes are there, two? Great episodes.

I also like how it's "Greatest Generation" Joe Mannix making his way through the vastly different world that is the early '70s. At the risk of sounding like Jo Ann Paul wink, Mannix is the everyman representing the hopes, fears, and concerns of the World War II generation.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2016 - 9:22 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I'd like to speed up my Mannix viewing gecause at my current rate it will be a few years before I arrive at season six. I like those last three seasons best because there's less Paramount lot stuff and a lot more location filming. How many San Francisco episodes are there, two? Great episodes.

I also like how it's "Greatest Generation" Joe Mannix making his way through the vastly different world that is the early '70s. At the risk of sounding like Jo Ann Paul wink, Mannix is the everyman representing the hopes, fears, and concerns of the World War II generation.



Mannix is a Korean war veteran: a classic 1950's man into the 1970's.
Actor Clint Eastwood has the same profile but he didn't go to Korea.


KOREAN WAR NOTES ABOUT SEASON 6
A reference to a former soldier helping blind veterans for the Sightseers Society occurs in “Cry Silence”. In “Harvest of Death”, Mannix is hired by a veteran pal named Dave Winters (actor Paul Mantee who previously played a veteran in “A Ticket to the Eclipse”) to investigate and posing as a crop duster. “The Man Who Wasn’t There” is a mixture of two previous Korean war soldier characters: Gus Keller from the season 2 “End Game” (who toys with explosives) and Mark from the season 4 “A Ticket to the Eclipse” (who threatens Peggy Fair).

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 2:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Yes, Mannix is a Korean War veteran who led a squad of psychopaths who make the Dirty Dozen look like the Bowery Boys, wink but his cultural and moral frame of reference is imo clearly the "Silent Majority." Besdes, there's only five years between WWII and the Korean War. smile

Speaking of those psychos, there was one about every other season, wasn't there? The last one had Clu Gulager playing the latest nutjob. I wonder if the producers even knew they were retellng the same story every two years or maybe it was just an inside joke being played on the audience? Those episodes are among my favorites but they were always played so gloriously over the top!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 2:52 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Yes, Mannix is a Korean War veteran who led a squad of psychopaths who make the Dirty Dozen look like the Bowery Boys, wink but his cultural and moral frame of reference is imo clearly the "Silent Majority." Besdes, there's only five years between WWII and the Korean War. smile

Speaking of those psychos, there was one about every other season, wasn't there? The last one had Clu Gulager playing the latest nutjob. I wonder if the producers even knew they were retellng the same story every two years or maybe it was just an inside joke being played on the audience? Those episodes are among my favorites but they were always played so gloriously over the top!



The three Korean war veterans were played by good performers:
Steve Ihnat
Darren McGavin
Clu Gulager

They anticipated a character like Rambo.

 
 Posted:   Jul 9, 2016 - 3:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Shouldn't Joseph Sirola's Harry Bennett character from "A Word Called Courage" from season eight? I believe he played a part setting up Mannix though I've only seen that episode once.

 
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