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 Posted:   Aug 25, 2017 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Thanks for the replies, gents. Paul, I enjoy the posts which blend memory along with enthusiasm for these shows. They're the kind of posts we should have more of here. smile

That's what I figured re: Trek "vs" Dr Who--while the About Time authors are quite knowledgeable and have written some truly outstanding and informative essays about not only Dr Who, but also the UK and its pop culture during 1963-89, which an Anglophile like myself loves. However, I do sense the tribal fanaticism and occasional anger that comes through in *some* of their writing; though the books are highly recommended; Trek should have books like those.

I first saw Dr Who when I was 9 (1980) and while I could see the difference with their production compared to Trek, young me chalked it up to Who being The English Way of Doing Things more than any budget constraints. I was quite accepting of the show's conceits and enjoyed Tom Baker and company on their own terms.

Gave up on Sherlock and NuWho years ago--don't get me started.


Sometimes limited budget is a good thing if it means skimping on fabric. [cough]Leela[/cough].

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2017 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm finding numerous TMP merchandise:

https://trekmovie.com/2009/12/08/tmp20-the-merchandise-of-star-trek-the-motion-picture/

https://trekmovie.com/2008/02/03/history-of-trek-movie-merchandising/


Some nice blueprint stuff in this "Star Trek Action Fleet" from 1980:

http://www.collectingcandy.com/wordpress/?p=7523

"...although Paramount probably wanted Star Trek: The Motion Picture to be a rollicking Star Wars-like adventure, under Gene Roddenberry’s influence it turned out to be a glacially-paced exploration of the human condition. Also, unlike the younger cast of Star Wars, Star Trek’s group of middle-aged TV actors probably weren’t up for a lot of running and jumping anyway. This made for an intelligent film, but to a kid it was about as exciting as C-SPAN. Even if the Star Trek: The Motion Picture toy line had been handled by a company that knew what it was doing it still probably wouldn’t have sold well.

https://futureprobe.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-star-trek-action-figure-deficiency.html

Hilarious. And so damned true.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2017 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

You brought back memories! I totally forgot I have the photostory, trading cards, and the ViewMaster reels stored away in a box somewhere.

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 8:31 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Mego was a great toy company--until they blew it by turning away the Star Wars license. After that, they grabbed onto every Jim-Kirk-Come-Lately film franchise in order to "make up" for their having bungled the Star Wars Job. They tried TMP and The Black Hole, and perhaps a few others I can't be bothered to remember right now... and while those were okay products they were nowhere near the quality of Kenner's Star Wars toys.

See? I wrote something nice about Star Wars! smile

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Mego was a great toy company--until they blew it by turning away the Star Wars license. After that, they grabbed onto every Jim-Kirk-Come-Lately film franchise in order to "make up" for their having bungled the Star Wars Job. They tried TMP and The Black Hole, and perhaps a few others I can't be bothered to remember right now... and while those were okay products they were nowhere near the quality of Kenner's Star Wars toys.

See? I wrote something nice anout Star Wars! smile


Wonder how Mego did with this license?



Why is there a Batman figure in a King Kong commercial?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 9:55 AM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)

I particularly like this bit of Star Trek merchandising - far and away the most accurate replica of something that appeared in pretty much every episode of TOS IIRC.

Is anyone the proud owner of this magnificent collector's item?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)

Here's another beautifully crafted replica from Trek..... so authentic, you would swear in came from the Paramount prop department......



 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I didn't know about the first Spock helmet you linked to until I saw it in one of the sites I linked to previously. Given what people are, I can only imagine the ass kickings a kid might have received while wearing that helmet.

I have always been impressed that Trek sustained pretty strong merchandising throughout the 1970s despite no active series or film. I had the Mego action figures and the Wnterprise carrying case with the "working" transporter:

http://www.megomuseum.com/galleries/enterprise/

Young Jim Phelps enjoyed many an hour playing with those toys in the olde backyard, circa 1978-79.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 10:27 AM   
 By:   Mike_J   (Member)

I can only imagine the ass kickings a kid might have received while wearing that helmet

Not if they were wearing the Kenner Star Trek Butt Protector ("as worn by Spock in the smash hit TV show")

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 12:01 PM   
 By:   Sean N   (Member)

I guess I was always about the phasers in the 70's. I had this saucer gun version, which was both kind of accurate and kind of not.



And I even put these together, including painting them (and I'm no modeller).



I think it's adorable that this same kit is still available.

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 5:29 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I can only imagine the ass kickings a kid might have received while wearing that helmet

Not if they were wearing the Kenner Star Trek Butt Protector ("as worn by Spock in the smash hit TV show")


What I could have done with an Agonizer aganst some of those bullies in school!

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2017 - 8:07 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

I had all the AMT Star Trek kits growing up. Built the Enterprise ten times over. Also build one as the Constellation and melted it with matches to simulate battle damage.

 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2017 - 7:18 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Getting back to TMP merchandise, it's interesting that it was largely marketed as a children's movie, which it most definitely is not, but then Star Trek must have been watched by millions of kids throughout the 1970s via syndication. Clearly Mego had Star Wars on the brain when they produced their TMP figure line.

However, it seems that Trek's primary audience would have been high school and college-aged people, making TMP's toy, coloring book, Happy Meal, action figure products all the more baffling...little did they know that adults would, by the 1990s, become a major audience for action figures!

 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2017 - 7:32 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Getting back to TMP merchandise, it's interesting that it was largely marketed as a children's movie, which it most definitely is not, but then Star Trek must have been watched by millions of kids throughout the 1970s via syndication. Clearly Mego had Star Wars on the brain when they produced their TMP figure line.

However, it seems that Trek's primary audience would have been high school and college-aged people, making TMP's toy, coloring book, Happy Meal, action figure products all the more baffling...little did they know that adults would, by the 1990s, become a major audience for action figures!


Your underestimating the ignorance of people in suits and marketing. They saw Star Wars business at the box office and thought, we have our own "Star Wars" Sci Fi property. Approved and sold it as such!

 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2017 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   Sean N   (Member)

However, it seems that Trek's primary audience would have been high school and college-aged people, making TMP's toy, coloring book, Happy Meal, action figure products all the more baffling...little did they know that adults would, by the 1990s, become a major audience for action figures!

This was exactly the group of people I waited in line with to see the movie opening night, so you're right about that. And having just graduated from high school, I never even thought about searching for action figures and the like (embarrasingly enough, I didn't start buying action figures until my late 20's!). Maybe that's why I didn't know about any of this stuff.

I don't even recall the Marvel comics adaptation, even though I haunted a couple of comics shops every week. Hmmm.

 
 Posted:   Sep 1, 2017 - 12:33 PM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)



As for Dudley Simpson it's criminal that most of his stuff is lost. I'd love a collection. Heath on this very site put a good selection of synth re-recordings together. I wish they would do another with the exact ensembles used for his tv music. A documentary during Who's 50th anniversary year had a tiny piece which showed how good it would sound.


Not just Doctor Who, I believe other shows Dudley Simpson worked on suffered the same fate. Blakes 7 being a prime example.

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2017 - 11:43 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)



As for Dudley Simpson it's criminal that most of his stuff is lost. I'd love a collection. Heath on this very site put a good selection of synth re-recordings together. I wish they would do another with the exact ensembles used for his tv music. A documentary during Who's 50th anniversary year had a tiny piece which showed how good it would sound.


Not just Doctor Who, I believe other shows Dudley Simpson worked on suffered the same fate. Blakes 7 being a prime example.


Lost or no, the scores themselves at least still exist alongside the episodes themselves that the Beeb didn't get around to wiping--not that most here ever discuss Dudley Simpson anyway. wink

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2017 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Just happened upon a DC Comic from June 1979 (cover dated September) which has a full-page, full-color ad for TMP. It's the ad with small photos of the intrepid Enterprise crew along the bottom of the ad; the aforementioned cinematic kiss of death. wink

With a summer ad advertising a Christmas '79 release, I suppose I could say that TMP was extensively marketed. It'd be interesting to know what other high-profile projects Paramount had in the pipeline at the time.

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2017 - 8:24 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Just happened upon a DC Comic from June 1979 (cover dated September) which has a full-page, full-color ad for TMP. It's the ad with small photos of the intrepid Enterprise crew along the bottom of the ad; the aforementioned cinematic kiss of death. wink

With a summer ad advertising a Christmas '79 release, I suppose I could say that TMP was extensively marketed. It'd be interesting to know what other high-profile projects Paramount had in the pipeline at the time.


That infamous poster art shows the original Phase 2 Enterprise design. wink

 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2017 - 3:23 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

That infamous poster art shows the original Phase 2 Enterprise design. wink

I'm impressed but not surprised that you know that (I of course had no clue).

 
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