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 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Norman Rosemont's production of THE COUNT OF MONTE-CRISTO starred Richard Chamberlain, Tony Curtis, and Trevor Howard, and aired on NBC on 10 January 1975. Later that year, the film was put into overseas theatrical release.

That happened with another Rosemont Production (Little Lord Fauntleroy) as well.



LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY starred then-hot child star Ricky Schroder along with Alec Guinness and Eric Porter. As with THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO, Allyn Ferguson provided the score. LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY aired on CBS on 25 November 1980 as part of the Hallmark Hall of Fame anthology series, and then immediately went into theatrical release overseas. Arthur Ibbetson won an Emmy for his cinematography on the film, which was shot in Britain.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 12:19 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

21 HOURS AT MUNICH told the story of the attack on Israeli athletes at the 1972 Summer Olympics. The television film starred William Holden, Shirley Knight, and Franco Nero, and was scored by Laurence Rosenthal. Unfortunately, the film aired (on ABC) on 7 November 1976, opposite the initial television showing of GONE WITH THE WIND on NBC, which guaranteed "MUNICH" virtually no audience. The film did obtain an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Drama Special, and was released theatrically overseas by Orion Pictures.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Capitalizing on the popularity of the first two AIRPORT films, CBS broadcast the telemovie MAYDAY AT 40,000 FEET on 12 November 1976. The film, about a disabled airliner, starred David Janssen, Don Meredith, and Christopher George. Warner Bros. subsequently released the film theatrically overseas.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 1:14 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Lorimar's telefilm SYBIL was broadcast on NBC over two nights, 14 & 15 November 1976. The film starred Sally Field as a young woman with sixteen distinct personalities. Joanne Woodward played her psychiatrist. Woodward had herself played a woman with multiple personalities (albeit only three) in the 1957 theatrical film THE THREE FACES OF EVE. SYBIL won multiple Emmy awards--Outstanding Special, Sally Field as Best actress, Stewart Stern's teleplay, and Leonard Rosenman's score. The film was edited down from its original length of 198 minutes to 122-132 minutes for overseas theatrical and video release.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 1:25 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

"Mission: Impossible" creator Bruce Geller produced and directed the telemovie THE SAVAGE BEES, which aired on NBC on 22 November 1976. The film, which starred Ben Johnson and Michael Parks, subsequently was released theatrically overseas.



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 2:10 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In late 1976 and early 1977, two U.S. television films, airing within 4 weeks of one another, told the story of the hijacking of Air France Flight 139 on 27 June 1976 from Athens, and the subsequent Israeli mission to rescue the hostages from the airport terminal at Entebbe in Uganda. Each of the films played in a 3-hour slot.

The first of these films was the David L. Wolper production of VICTORY AT ENTEBBE. The film boasted an all-star cast, which included Helmut Berger, Theodore Bikel, Linda Blair, Kirk Douglas, Richard Dreyfuss, Helen Hayes, Anthony Hopkins, Burt Lancaster, and Elizabeth Taylor. Julius Harris played Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, replacing Godfrey Cambridge, who had died during production. The film aired on ABC on 13 December 1976. In order to beat its competition on air, VICTORY AT ENTEBBE was rushed through production, being videotaped instead of filmed. It was later converted to film by Warner Bros. for subsequent theatrical showings overseas.



The second telefilm was titled RAID ON ENTEBBE, and it had stars of its own—Peter Finch (in his last screen role), Martin Balsam, Horst Bucholtz, John Saxon, Charles Bronson, Jack Warden, Yaphet Kotto, James Woods, and Robert Loggia. David Shire provided the score. The film aired on NBC on 9 January 1977 and was subsequently released theatrically by 20th Century Fox.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Producer Norman Rosemont once again pulled together an all-star cast for his 1977 retelling of THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK. The television film starred Richard Chamberlain in a dual role, backed by Patrick McGoohan, Louis Jordan, Ian Holm, Sir Ralph Richardson, Jenny Agutter, and Vivien Merchant. The film aired on NBC on 17 January 1977. ITC aided in releasing the film overseas. Here is the Spanish poster, on which the film is titled simply "The Iron Mask."

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The Rankin/Bass production of THE LAST DINOSAUR was a film about the world's richest man, who is trapped in a pocket of time without weapons, and is pursued by a primitive tribe while searching for the last living dinosaur. The film starred Richard Boone and Joan Van Ark, and had special effects done in Japan. Maury Laws scored the film, which was originally scheduled for theatrical release in the United States. These plans were cancelled however, and an edited 95-minute version of the film aired on ABC on 11 February 1977. When the film was subsequently put into theatrical release overseas, it ran its original length of 106 minutes. Although earlier video releases were at 95 minutes, the most recent U.S. video release, as a MOD DVD from the Warner Archive, has restored the film to its original 106-minute length.



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 4:54 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

In late 1976 and early 1977, two U.S. television films, airing within 4 weeks of one another, told the story of the hijacking of Air France Flight 139 on 27 June 1976 from Athens, and the subsequent Israeli mission to rescue the hostages from the airport terminal at Entebbe in Uganda. Each of the films played in a 3-hour slot.

The first of these films was the David L. Wolper production of VICTORY AT ENTEBBE. The film boasted an all-star cast, which included Helmut Berger, Theodore Bikel, Linda Blair, Kirk Douglas, Richard Dreyfuss, Helen Hayes, Anthony Hopkins, Burt Lancaster, and Elizabeth Taylor. Julius Harris played Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, replacing Godfrey Cambridge, who had died during production. The film aired on ABC on 13 December 1976. In order to beat its competition on air, VICTORY AT ENTEBBE was rushed through production, being videotaped instead of filmed. It was later converted to film by Warner Bros. for subsequent theatrical showings overseas.



The second telefilm was titled RAID ON ENTEBBE, and it had stars of its own—Peter Finch (in his last screen role), Martin Balsam, Horst Bucholtz, John Saxon, Charles Bronson, Jack Warden, Yaphet Kotto, James Woods, and Robert Loggia. David Shire provided the score. The film aired on NBC on 9 January 1977 and was subsequently released theatrically by 20th Century Fox.

Don't bother getting the version on D.V.D., which is cut, while the version that aired on the Plex cable channel had an hour's worth of footage (which I taped off the channel and I still have on V.H.S..).

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2013 - 11:35 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Filmed under the working title of "Flight of the Maiden," SST--DEATH FLIGHT told the story of a disaster aboard a supersonic transport. The ABC Circle Films production aired on ABC on 25 February 1977, nearly 2 1/2 years before the theatrical film THE CONCORDE--AIRPORT '79 hit the big screen. SST--DEATH FLIGHT had the usual complement of TV stars on board, including Robert Reed, Peter Graves, Lorne Greene, Doug McClure, and Martin Milner. John Cacavas, who scored AIRPORT 1975 and AIRPORT '77, provided the score for this film as well. When the film was rerun on television, the name was changed to "SST: Disaster In the Sky." In its overseas theatrical showings, the film went by numerous titles. On the Italian poster below, it is called "New York - Paris Air Sabotage 78." Notice that the Italian poster lists actor Brock Peters as "Peters Brock."



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The television film JUST A LITTLE INCONVENIENCE aired on NBC on 2 October 1977. The film was about a Vietnam veteran's attempts to rehabilitate his buddy, who has become bitter and withdrawn after losing limbs in action. The film starred Lee Majors and James Stacy. Stacy was returning to television acting for the first time after actually losing his left arm and left leg in a serious motorcycle accident that claimed the life of his girlfriend. In 1980, Universal released the film to theaters overseas.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 4:43 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Filmed as "A Dangerous Love," this telemovie starring Linda Purl, Desi Arnez, Jr., and Jessica Walter eventually carried the more salacious title of BLACK MARKET BABY when it aired on ABC on 7 October 1977. The film concerned a young college girl who becomes pregnant and then is caught up in a struggle with a black market adoption ring out to take her baby. In some overseas markets, this Brut production carried the title "Don't Steal My Baby," but in the Spanish poster below, the original television title is shown.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 9:36 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE INCREDIBLE HULK had at least two releases overseas - the pilot movie and the two-parter "Married"

http://bigglee.blogspot.com/2011/06/incredible-hulk-tv-show-overseas-lou.html





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Here are additional versions of the posters from those two HULK films. First, the English-language version of the pilot film--THE INCREDIBLE HULK. That film was originally broadcast on CBS on 4 November 1977. Universal released it to theaters overseas in 1978.



The second season of the series began with a two-hour episode entitled "Married," broadcast on 22 September 1978. That was released overseas as a feature in 1979. Here is the French version of "Married," entitled HULK RETURNS! (HULK 2).



The text in the box at the lower right of the poster reads: "You are invited to the wedding of the century! Earth tremors, hurricanes and Dr. Banner, who, under the effect of gamma rays, becomes on the night of his wedding, the Incredible Hulk!"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Alan Landsberg Productions' TARANTULAS: THE DEADLY CARGO was about a cargo plane that crashes and unleashes a horde of deadly tarantulas on a southwestern town. Jazz guitarist Mundell Lowe scored the film, which aired on CBS on 28 December 1977. It later received some foreign theatrical distribution.



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Norman Rosemont continued his string of historical productions with this fifth filming of the venerable THE FOUR FEATHERS. This iteration starred Beau Bridges as Harry Faversham, a British soldier in the 1880s who fights to regain his honor after being accused of cowardice. The supporting cast included such British stalwarts as Robert Powell, Simon Ward, Jane Seymour, and Harry Andrews. Don Sharp (KISS OF THE VAMPIRE) directed and Rosemont regular Allyn Ferguson scored the film, which aired on NBC on New Year's night, 1 January 1978. Granda International handled overseas theatrical distribution.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2013 - 10:48 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Rankin/Bass produced THE BERMUDA DEPTHS, about scientists who are threatened by a beautiful girl who seems to have returned from the dead, and by a prehistoric sea creature that dwells in the Bermuda Triangle. Special effects and creature elements were handled by Japan's Tsuburaya Productions, who also did THE LAST DINOSAUR (see above), and were most famous for the Ultraman franchise. The film starred Burl Ives, Carl Weathers, and Connie Sellecca. It premiered on ABC on 27 January 1978, and later had some overseas theatrical engagements.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2013 - 11:56 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Hanna-Barbera produced the fantasy / action / musical television film KISS MEETS THE PHANTOM OF THE PARK, in which the bizarrely costumed rock group KISS made its acting debut. In the film, the four band members thwart a mad scientist (Anthony Zerbe) who is trying to destroy their careers. PHANTOM OF THE PARK aired on NBC on 28 October 1978. Avco Embassy then picked up the film for domestic release, and went so far as to obtain a [PG] rating from the MPAA and prepare a one-sheet poster for the film, newly titled "Attack of the Phantoms." But there is no evidence that the film was actually released to U.S. theaters. The film did play some overseas engagements, in a different edit of the film from the U.S. televised version. In the Argentinean poster below, the film is titled "Kiss Against the Ghosts."



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2013 - 10:13 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In a situation reminiscent of the dualing TV movies about the Israeli attack on Entebbe, 1978 saw the premiere of two TV films that covered another airline-related event. In December 1972, an airliner crashed in the Florida Everglades, killing 103 passengers. Another 73 passengers were rescued, and over the years a legend grew up over the causes and aftermath of the crash.

The first film to address the subject was Paramount’s THE GHOST OF FLIGHT 401, which starred Ernest Borgnine, Gary Lockwood, and Kim Basinger. That film aired on NBC on 19 February 1978, and later won an Emmy award for its cinematography.

The second film was CRASH, from Charles Fries Productions. CRASH starred William Shatner, Adrienne Barbeau, and Brooke Bundy, and aired eight months later on ABC on 29 October 1978. Also appearing in the film was famed bandleader Artie Shaw, making his TV-movie debut. Bob Crane (“Hogan's Heroes”) was originally cast in this movie, but was murdered before filming commenced.

Although THE GHOST OF FLIGHT 401 is considered by some to be the better film, it was CRASH that received a theatrical release overseas, re-titled in English-speaking markets as “The Crash of Flight 401.”



The Italian poster below, under the title “S.O.S. Miami Airport,” is headlined as the “Story of a Plane Crash That Actually Happened!”


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 23, 2013 - 10:40 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

STRANGER IN OUR HOUSE was a thriller starring Linda Blair, Lee Purcell, and Jeremy Slate. It told the story of a young girl's encounter with witchcraft when a cousin turns up at her house and begins using supernatural powers. The film was directed by horror veteran Wes Craven and was broadcast on NBC on 31 October 1978, and was later re-run on CBS. The film was based on Lois Duncan's novel Summer of Fear, which was the title under which the film was released theatrically overseas (and the title that has also been used in its subsequent video releases).



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2013 - 12:42 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Clive Donner directed the fourth major filming of THE THIEF OF BAGHDAD, a television movie that aired on NBC on 23 November 1978. The film starred Roddy McDowall, Peter Ustinov, and Terence Stamp. John Cameron scored the film, which was released theatrically overseas by Columbia.

 
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