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 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   L BENDER   (Member)

During all my years of movie going, I am still amazed when one of my favorite directors makes a terrible film. Maybe its just to make a buck, I don't know. Example- I can't believe that the same man that made 2001 and SPARTACUS made EYES WIDE SHUT.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 5:38 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

When a director is around making films for a long period of time, they're simply bound to have some not-so-good ones. For myself, I'm a huge John Carpenter fan, and I find very little to like about Ghosts of Mars. Besides the story needing a bit more work, I thought Ice Cube was a terrible casting choice. (And it was almost worse considering Courtney Love originally had the lead role, but thankfully she was replaced by Natasha Henstridge soon into filming.)

I also don't particularly like Hook, Amistad or Minority Report when it comes to Spielberg movies.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 5:43 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

Terence Young who set the standard for Bond films and "Inchon". So many of the film's problems have to go beyond the Moonie interference and be laid at his feet.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

During all my years of movie going, I am still amazed when one of my favorite directors makes a terrible film. Maybe its just to make a buck, I don't know. Example- I can't believe that the same man that made 2001 and SPARTACUS made EYES WIDE SHOT.

I'm a little more of the school of thought that says I can't believe the man who made 2001 and EYES WIDE SHUT made SPARTACUS.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   L BENDER   (Member)

GODFATHER 3.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 10:22 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Well i guess one of the imfamous ones was At long last love-75- by Peter Bogdanovich

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2011 - 11:29 PM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

Well i guess one of the imfamous ones was At long last love-75- by Peter Bogdinivich[spelling]

It`s Peter Bogdanovich.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 4:04 AM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

Paul Verhoeven - SHOWGIRLS

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   L BENDER   (Member)

John Huston- ANNIE

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 9:21 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

There's nothing wrong with Eyes Wide Shut. Kubrick was just telling it how it is. The film has many moments to savour. And I've always liked the soundtrack album. The real odd thing is that Jocelyn Pook should have made a big impact in film music circles. The Masked Ball woke me up!

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   Storyteller   (Member)

Steven Spielberg-Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull (this one still gives me nightmares), Lost World (this actually beats Crystal Skull in the "just how bad is this going to get" category. No redeeming qualities other than score.)

Martin Scorsese-Last Temptation Of Christ (alongside the controversy, this movie is just crap. It looks cheap and the performances were incredibly lackluster. Complete fail.)

Kubrick-Eyes Wide Shut (how many people watched this disaster of a film. Thankfully, time will be unkind to this mess and it will fade away.)

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

i believe i started a thread with the same title and subject.
use the search engine, dammit!

have a nice daysmile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

This thread is loaded with what we used to call, back in my college days, "glittering generalities!"

I've seen thousands and thousands of movies in my lifetime already, and while there were many I didn't like (at all!!!), I can't think of many I thought were "bad" films in the way that you all are suggesting. The "bad films" were just ones I disliked.

Most of the people employed in the film industry today, and in the past, are tops in their craft categories, from director to makeup person. Most of them work hard at their job at hand, and put their best efforts into making the best film they can, at that moment. Most of my adult life was spent working on soundstages or location sites. I can tell you that the creative people I associated with, physically worked very, very hard each day, to get the job done. In my years, I've encountered very few people who sloughed off their duties or abandoned their creativity.

In the end, whether the film, as a whole, worked for the audience, or whether the individual craft elements were stunted by the limitations of the budgets or time constraints---was really no individual's fault in this very collaborative medium. Most everyone tries his best.

When I used to go to the movies, in the Golden-Age-of-the-Studio days, I knew that even if I didn't like the film, itself---the excellence of the art direction or the photography or the costumes or the set dressing or the makeup or the editing or the scoring, would probably be enough to make the film stick in my mind. There are still movies from the past which I love, primarily, for one or more of these aspects.

When I see the lists of "bad" films posted in your various lists above---many of which are major films, but also many of which I didn't enjoy at all---it makes me wonder if some of you have actually seen any "bad films"---films which reflect absolutely no redeeming artistic values or skills in any area of filmmaking expertise. I certainly can't think of many like this that I have seen in 70 years.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   L BENDER   (Member)

This thread is loaded with what we used to call, back in my college days, "glittering generalities!"

I've seen thousands and thousands of movies in my lifetime already, and while there were many I didn't like (at all!!!), I can't think of many I thought were "bad" films in the way that you all are suggesting. The "bad films" were just ones I disliked.

Most of the people employed in the film industry today, and in the past, are tops in their craft categories, from director to makeup person. Most of them work hard at their job at hand, and put their best efforts into making the best film they can, at that moment. Most of my adult life was spent working on soundstages or location sites. I can tell you that the creative people I associated with, physically worked very, very hard each day, to get the job done. In my years, I've encountered very few people who sloughed off their duties or abandoned their creativity.

In the end, whether the film, as a whole, worked for the audience, or whether the individual craft elements were stunted by the limitations of the budgets or time constraints---was really no individual's fault in this very collaborative medium. Most everyone tries his best.

When I used to go to the movies, in the Golden-Age-of-the-Studio days, I knew that even if I didn't like the film, itself---the excellence of the art direction or the photography or the costumes or the set dressing or the makeup or the editing or the scoring, would probably be enough to make the film stick in my mind. There are still movies from the past which I love, primarily, for one or more of these aspects.

When I see the lists of "bad" films posted in your various lists above---many of which are major films, but also many of which I didn't enjoy at all---it makes me wonder if some of you have actually seen any "bad films"---films which reflect absolutely no redeeming artistic values or skills in any area of filmmaking expertise. I certainly can't think of many like this that I have seen in 70 years.
Have you seen GUMMO?

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 3:08 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Syfy movies. I recently watched Witchville -- which, to be honest, was far better than some Syfy movies I've seen -- and it broke my heart a little bit to hear that the director had apparently poured his heart and soul into the film with such generally poor results.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

There's nothing wrong with Eyes Wide Shut. Kubrick was just telling it how it is. The film has many moments to savour. And I've always liked the soundtrack album. The real odd thing is that Jocelyn Pook should have made a big impact in film music circles. The Masked Ball woke me up!

Agreed.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2011 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO Manderley- I agree with you 100%, all the talent in the film industry yet all the insults, but let's put the blame where the blame lies, mainstream critics, they lead the way to such attitudes, always have, Rex Reed and the like, if it does not smell good to them it stinks, can't or couldn't they say i just don't like the film, it just does not attract my taste buds, no they can't do that can they, this board is cool, good stuff, but we have problems like that on this board, it's everywhere in life, but all the blood , sweat and tears that artists put into their craft,to see it torn asunder is a pitiful thing, Why we are hear now, film composers have often got the worst of it.

 
 Posted:   Jul 14, 2011 - 9:25 AM   
 By:   KubrickFan   (Member)

Steven Spielberg-Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull (this one still gives me nightmares), Lost World (this actually beats Crystal Skull in the "just how bad is this going to get" category. No redeeming qualities other than score.)

Martin Scorsese-Last Temptation Of Christ (alongside the controversy, this movie is just crap. It looks cheap and the performances were incredibly lackluster. Complete fail.)

Kubrick-Eyes Wide Shut (how many people watched this disaster of a film. Thankfully, time will be unkind to this mess and it will fade away.)


I actually see the opposite happening. Both Eyes Wide Shut and A.I. seem to be appreciated a lot better than when they were released years ago. I also have to disagree with you on The Lost World and Last Temptation of Christ. TLW has some annoying and sloppy moments, but so did Jurassic Park. At least it had a different feel from the original, and wasn't just an ordinary rehash. On Last Temptation, I've only seen it once, but I really liked it. At least it was nowhere as preachy as the average religious epic of the 50's. Or The Passion of the Christ, for that matter.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2011 - 8:09 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)


There's nothing wrong with Eyes Wide Shut. Kubrick was just telling it how it is. The film has many moments to savour. And I've always liked the soundtrack album. The real odd thing is that Jocelyn Pook should have made a big impact in film music circles. The Masked Ball woke me up!

Agreed.


The emotional center of EYES WIDE SHUT is ... hollow. Not because of anything Kubrick did. His work is brilliant here. The problem was in the casting. Tom Cruise didn't have the personality or the emotional range to play the part. His performance is wooden and uncomprehending. I think he gets it up to a point on an intellectual level, but acting is an emotional process, and the emotional life of this character is simply not there. Todd Field, who played Nick Nightingale the piano player, should have swapped roles with Cruise. Fields could have nailed it. Although frankly I would rather have seen Jack Nicholson or Richard Dreyfuss or anyone other than Cruise.

In comparison, Cruise's wife at the time, Nicole Kidman, is so good she makes a fool out of her husband.

Steven Spielberg's WAR OF THE WORLDS was a huge disappointment, because of Cruise, because of the smudgy desaturated image, and because of the script. Another dead-beat dad story to please the militant feminists in charge at the studio just like all the other dead-beat dad stories they're imposing on every other film that gets green-lighted. What's it doing in an H.G. Wells sci-fi classic? I would rather they used the characters and told the story H.G. Wells wrote. But I guess even Spielberg has to play ball, to some degree, if he wants to make movies.


Richard

 
 Posted:   Jul 15, 2011 - 8:22 PM   
 By:   Altamese   (Member)

Another dead-beat dad story to please the militant feminists in charge at the studio just like all the other dead-beat dad stories they're imposing on every other film that gets green-lighted.
Richard


Isn't that "deadbeat dad" thing just a trope, to make it easy to do character development. The guy starts out as a deadbeat, and throughout the movie grows so at the end he's not a dead beat.

How about the "cocky" character who always knows better than the experienced professionals how to do things?

Will Smith's character in Men In Black, Tom Cruise's character in Top Gun, Hal Jordan in the new Green Lantern (you telling me all those other Lanterns couldn't figure out easy it was to destroy Parallax?)

I'll admit I'm sick of the movies that glamorize unwed motherhood, like Juno, Knocked Up, et al.

 
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