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 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

PFK, I agree with those other names you mentioned. It's not golden age but on my most desired list is Jarre's RESURRECTION and Addison's CENTENNIAL. If Kritzerland does a tribute CD to Henry King or Gregory Peck at Fox, I hope they will include THE GUNFIGHTER by Alfred Newman. It's definitely golden age and very special to me. I know it's a short score, but I see Kritzerland including short scores on their releases.

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

I've made no secret of the fact that my holy grail would be a complete OBSESSION. That score seems to exist in a no-man's land which falls somewhere between The Golden Age and the newer 80's/90's milieu.

I would think that OBSESSION might appeal to devotees of both of those eras.


I'm with you. OBSESSION belongs to the elite list of unreleased scores — that list of the highest prizes amongst remaining unreleased scores.


Soundtrackcollector gives a few releases (LP/CD) for this one (apart from a bootleg), so they are all re-recordings?


Okay, loose language on my part. I mean unexpanded not unreleased.

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 10:42 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

I guess the interest for golden age is waning.

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I guess the interest for golden age is waning.

Hey, the interest, qualitatively speaking, still burns very bright. It's just that quantitatively speaking, those of us with a passion for it are sadly losing members faster than we're adding them.

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 12:38 PM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

Given my age, I was mostly exposed to movies from the 80s, but that does not mean I have any specific interest to these soundtracks.

I don't think the Golden Age scores have a very broad range of style, and I can understand that someone who is not familiar with classical music from 1900 to 1980 may not have a strong interest in the scores. However, there is a lot more than Golden Age stuff and Hollywood movies from the 80s. I feel that many members are just collecting one era and do not care about everything else, which may be fair, somehow I do the same by ignoring most big soundtracks from the 80s (I still have plenty of soundtracks from this era although in most cases for independent films and not popular movies).

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 1:22 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)


I don't think the Golden Age scores have a very broad range of style,


Hmmm....let's see. From just one, composer, Franz Waxman, we have:


and

and


All three of these certainly might fit your idea of a "Golden Age" sound, but can you really say they aren't very different from each other? And then we have stuff like...



Surely that doesn't sound much like the others at all?

And I can't resist including this, even though since it was composed after 1960 it possibly doesn't fit your definition of Golden Age:


Now contrast Waxman as a composer with say, Rozsa (more diverse in style than people give him credit for, as you could tell if you had the FSM Rozsa box)...or even more stylistically diverse composers like Alfred Newman, Hugo Friedhofer, Roy Webb, or possibly the king of them all, Bernard Herrmann (yes, you could always tell a Herrmann score from his strong style, but within that style he did a lot of different things). I think if you actually listened to Golden Age music, you wouldn't confuse the styles of any of these composers, with a very broad range between them.

Nowaways, with half of the film music getting churned out in Hollywood, you can't tell who wrote it, because even if done by a talented composer with an original voice (they're certainly still out there), they very likely had to contend with a temp track made up of a bunch of other composers' work, and some of THAT music was probably written for films that was temp-tracked...

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 1:30 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

I don't think the Golden Age scores have a very broad range of style...

You mean like jazz, classical, rock....

Perhaps your statement is a mite too broad a generalization. Just saying.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)


I don't think the Golden Age scores have a very broad range of style,


Hmmm....let's see. From just one, composer, Franz Waxman, we have:


and

and


All three of these certainly might fit your idea of a "Golden Age" sound, but can you really say they aren't very different from each other? And then we have stuff like...



Surely that doesn't sound much like the others at all?

And I can't resist including this, even though since it was composed after 1960 it possibly doesn't fit your definition of Golden Age:


Now contrast Waxman as a composer with say, Rozsa (more diverse in style than people give him credit for, as you could tell if you had the FSM Rozsa box)...or even more stylistically diverse composers like Alfred Newman, Hugo Friedhofer, Roy Webb, or possibly the king of them all, Bernard Herrmann (yes, you could always tell a Herrmann score from his strong style, but within that style he did a lot of different things). I think if you actually listened to Golden Age music, you wouldn't confuse the styles of any of these composers, with a very broad range between them.

Nowaways, with half of the film music getting churned out in Hollywood, you can't tell who wrote it, because even if done by a talented composer with an original voice (they're certainly still out there), they very likely had to contend with a temp track made up of a bunch of other composers' work, and some of THAT music was probably written for films that was temp-tracked...

Yavar



Gotta add this one to bring the point home:


 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

I don't think the Golden Age scores have a very broad range of style...

You mean like jazz, classical, rock....

Perhaps your statement is a mite too broad a generalization. Just saying.


Yes, in the formal sense all Golden Age CDs/LPs versus everything else. Of course, this probably applies to all soundtracks from a particular country and period. I am just saying that I understand the logic behind someone saying that (original) Golden Age scores, in general, are not his "thing".

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:04 PM   
 By:   slint   (Member)


I think if you actually listened to Golden Age music, you wouldn't confuse the styles of any of these composers, with a very broad range between them.


I actually listen to Golden Age soundtracks. Why do you assume I do not? My last few posts were all about more Golden Age releases...

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:10 PM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

I actually listen to Golden Age soundtracks. Why do you assume I do not?

Just a speculation because you said there want much stylistic diversity...sorry for assuming.

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:10 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

Excellent examples, Yavar.

Those of us who appreciate Golden Age scores (or in my case, a broad appreciation of ALL eras) are probably barking up the wrong tree in trying to get those who dismiss anything pre-80s as "sounding all the same" to give these scores a chance. They are just not interested in venturing beyond their comfort zone. Most of the initial posters here who were expressing their dislike of older scores have already lost interest and wandered off. ( not addressing slint, but posters from a few days back).

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:48 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

It is actually because there is so much stylistic diversity in golden age scores (and silver age scores to a lesser extent) that I don't buy every one that is released. Some styles are more my thing than others. Even within works of a single composer there are works I like and works that I don't.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 2:59 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I guess the interest for golden age is waning.



I don't think I would say that, although my guess is there are fewer golden age collectors than 20 or 30 years ago.

I think there is still a rather small but loyal and enthusiastic base of golden age fans. They buy about all of the new golden age cds, that includes me.

Many golden age cds that press 1,000 copies have sold out or are in low supply. Even some 2,000 and 3,000 copies of golden age scores have sold out like LLL 55 Days at Peking. It looks like Gunfight at the OK Corral is nearing 2,000 in sales as MV said they have now pressed the last batch.

Maybe Bruce K. can give us some insight on his golden age sales, but I think overall it's encouraging.

There is hope for us yet! smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 3:03 PM   
 By:   MD   (Member)

I guess the interest for golden age is waning.

I don´t think so. My serious interest in Golden Age scores just started and I must say that Golden Age movie music is beautiful and I am glad that I can enjoy it now, specially scores by Waxman, Friedhofer, Raksin, Tiomkin.


 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 3:05 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

I guess the interest for golden age is waning.

I don´t think so. My serious interest in Golden Age scores just started and I must say that Golden Age movie music is beautiful and I am glad that I can enjoy it now, specially scores by Waxman, Friedhofer, Raksin, Tiomkin.




Yes! Yes! Yes! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   PFK   (Member)

PFK, I agree with those other names you mentioned. It's not golden age but on my most desired list is Jarre's RESURRECTION and Addison's CENTENNIAL. If Kritzerland does a tribute CD to Henry King or Gregory Peck at Fox, I hope they will include THE GUNFIGHTER by Alfred Newman. It's definitely golden age and very special to me. I know it's a short score, but I see Kritzerland including short scores on their releases.



Cody, John Addison was another excellent composer all through the "jackhammer" 80s and 90s etc.
In 1980 I almost got to meet him at Tony Thomas' house in Burbank, but John had to reschedule his visit so I missed him. Oh well....

I never could warm up to Jarre's music, although I do like some of his scores like Crossed Swords.

I like ALL Alfred Newman. The main title to The Gunfighter is a knockout, so full of energy. As you may know it was later used for the river pirate music in How the West Was Won. The Gunfighter is a great film, one of the first adult westerns. Glad you like it.

We need more Alfred Newman cds! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 3:30 PM   
 By:   slint   (Member)

If listen to my Golden Age CDs, I can say in most cases that it "sounds like a Golden Age" CD compared to any other CD in my collection, in part because of the sound quality/production, which is not a critic. Other than those who mostly did musicals, I rarely find a composer that deviates much from I what I like.

The Italian soundtracks from 60s and 70s that I collect have a much more narrow range in style... which is perhaps the reason why I collect them.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   cody1949   (Member)

PFK, I agree with those other names you mentioned. It's not golden age but on my most desired list is Jarre's RESURRECTION and Addison's CENTENNIAL. If Kritzerland does a tribute CD to Henry King or Gregory Peck at Fox, I hope they will include THE GUNFIGHTER by Alfred Newman. It's definitely golden age and very special to me. I know it's a short score, but I see Kritzerland including short scores on their releases.



Cody, John Addison was another excellent composer all through the "jackhammer" 80s and 90s etc.
In 1980 I almost got to meet him at Tony Thomas' house in Burbank, but John had to reschedule his visit so I missed him. Oh well....

I never could warm up to Jarre's music, although I do like some of his scores like Crossed Swords.

I like ALL Alfred Newman. The main title to The Gunfighter is a knockout, so full of energy. As you may know it was later used for the river pirate music in How the West Was Won. The Gunfighter is a great film, one of the first adult westerns. Glad you like it.

We need more Alfred Newman cds! smile


Definitely agree with you on the need for more Alfred Newman. Regarding the river pirate music in How the West Was Won. I have listened to it a number of times and I just can't find the drive and energy that it has as the opening to THE GUNFIGHTER. If you are reading this thread Bruce, please consider it. Not just for me and PFK but for many others.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 11, 2013 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

PFK, I agree with those other names you mentioned. It's not golden age but on my most desired list is Jarre's RESURRECTION and Addison's CENTENNIAL. If Kritzerland does a tribute CD to Henry King or Gregory Peck at Fox, I hope they will include THE GUNFIGHTER by Alfred Newman. It's definitely golden age and very special to me. I know it's a short score, but I see Kritzerland including short scores on their releases.



Cody, John Addison was another excellent composer all through the "jackhammer" 80s and 90s etc.
In 1980 I almost got to meet him at Tony Thomas' house in Burbank, but John had to reschedule his visit so I missed him. Oh well....

I never could warm up to Jarre's music, although I do like some of his scores like Crossed Swords.

I like ALL Alfred Newman. The main title to The Gunfighter is a knockout, so full of energy. As you may know it was later used for the river pirate music in How the West Was Won. The Gunfighter is a great film, one of the first adult westerns. Glad you like it.

We need more Alfred Newman cds! smile


Definitely agree with you on the need for more Alfred Newman. Regarding the river pirate music in How the West Was Won. I have listened to it a number of times and I just can't find the drive and energy that it has as the opening to THE GUNFIGHTER. If you are reading this thread Bruce, please consider it. Not just for me and PFK but for many others.


Believe me, there is a LOT on the Fox plate smile

 
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