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 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 10:30 PM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

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 Posted:   Jul 11, 2013 - 11:00 PM   
 By:   nipotente   (Member)

These last minute music changes and score rejections just seem like such a waste of money and more importantly wonderful artist's time and talent.

Don't the producers and directors or powers that be ever consider all the passion and sweat that so many people have put into a score? It just feels so inconsiderate and almost selfish and very disrespectful. The words "loyalty" and "trust" mean nothing it seems for some in the business.

I felt the same way when it happened to Goldsmith on TIMELINE and Shore on KING KONG.

It's just a movie for heaven's sake, not the end of the world. Everyone who ever threw out a Goldsmith, Shore or Horner or any other great score is simply an idiot. Whatever reasons. They ultimately lose. What is happening with COMMUNICATION between a composer and a director?

Yes it is a "business". Again, they and in a way we all ultimately lose.

Just my opinion.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 12:51 AM   
 By:   AMRA75   (Member)

It happens sometimes because the music is simply not right. Think about Delerue's Regarding Henry (too serious) , Bernstein's Natty Gann (it's not a western)... So before making any judgement, try to see the movie with the original music. If you can't, well, don't judge!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 3:50 AM   
 By:   Drawgoon   (Member)

Boy, what a year this has been for Horner...

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 4:19 AM   
 By:   LEONCIO   (Member)

it's a score rejected o opposing views?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:03 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

These last minute music changes and score rejections just seem like such a waste of money and more importantly wonderful artist's time and talent.

But we have no idea why it happened. Maybe it was a last-minute effort to salvage a film earning poor reviews. Maybe the movie had been re-edited and Horner wasn't available to or wasn't interested in redoing the score to fit the new cut. Maybe it was decided, as mentioned above, that Horner's score, for reasons having nothing to do with its musical quality, wasn't a good fit for the film. We don't know why this happened, but it certainly wasn't just to waste some money and time.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:06 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I'm sorry to hear Horner is off this one too, as I had longed for an über-romantic Horner again in the style of MASK OF ZORRO or LEGENDS OF THE FALL or even TITANIC. But Korzeniowski is a brilliant composer in his own right, so I'm sure it will be great nonetheless.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 5:14 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

It's just a movie for heaven's sake, not the end of the world. Everyone who ever threw out a Goldsmith, Shore or Horner or any other great score is simply an idiot.

Somewhat contradictory sentences.

I don't make films, but even in the work that I do, I won't let other people's contributions get in the way of what I think to be right. You may understand that one day.

TG

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

There could not be a more perfect fit for the subject matter of ROMEO AND JULIET than Abel Korzeniowski. However, it is most unfortunate he was only hired last minute. Had he gotten the assignment right from the start, I would have thought this to be his most likely break-through opportunity into the A-list. I just hope he has had enough sketches waiting in his drawers for an opportunity like this.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

I'd never heard of the guy till Khan told me Horner got rejected and I read this thread.

holy shit:




Credit where credit is due, finally. Khan > someone.

That youtube clip is fantastic.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   JJH   (Member)


Credit where credit is due, finally. Khan > someone.





You're worse than Yor.


 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:39 AM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)


Credit where credit is due, finally. Khan > someone.





You're worse than Yor.


That is low, sir.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   JJH   (Member)


Credit where credit is due, finally. Khan > someone.


You're worse than Yor.


That is low, sir.



Anyway, how bout them Polish composers?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 7:56 AM   
 By:   Mike Skerritt   (Member)

These last minute music changes and score rejections just seem like such a waste of money and more importantly wonderful artist's time and talent.

But we have no idea why it happened. Maybe it was a last-minute effort to salvage a film earning poor reviews. Maybe the movie had been re-edited and Horner wasn't available to or wasn't interested in redoing the score to fit the new cut. Maybe it was decided, as mentioned above, that Horner's score, for reasons having nothing to do with its musical quality, wasn't a good fit for the film. We don't know why this happened, but it certainly wasn't just to waste some money and time.


Exactly. No one spends all of the time and money to hire a composer and record a score because they want to throw it all out and start again. There are a lot of perfectly legitimate reasons for a score to be rejected, some even artistic. Sometimes it just ain't working.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 10:33 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

There could not be a more perfect fit for the subject matter of ROMEO AND JULIET than Abel Korzeniowski. However, it is most unfortunate he was only hired last minute. Had he gotten the assignment right from the start, I would have thought this to be his most likely break-through opportunity into the A-list. I just hope he has had enough sketches waiting in his drawers for an opportunity like this.

Do we know how last-minute this was, though? It was only announced yesterday, but his score was recorded in June, and we have no idea how long he had to work on it before then. Maybe it was a week or two, maybe it was a month or two. Who knows?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   Urs Lesse   (Member)

Do we know how last-minute this was, though? It was only announced yesterday, but his score was recorded in June, and we have no idea how long he had to work on it before then. Maybe it was a week or two, maybe it was a month or two. Who knows?

Yes, and I'm hopeful he'll score another surprise hit with this one (just like his great COPERNICUS' STAR). smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:01 AM   
 By:   KonstantinosZ   (Member)

I'm looking forward to Korzeniowski's score because he's my favourite composer these last couple of years!
His Single Man and W.E. are masterpieces!

But I have a question:
Now, when a composer writes the score, they do midi mock-ups of it.
I mean they don't hear the score for the first time when it's recorded.
So, hadn't the producers/director realized from Horner's midi mock-ups that the score didn't suit their needs?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2013 - 11:02 AM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Don't the producers and directors or powers that be ever consider all the passion and sweat that so many people have put into a score? It just feels so inconsiderate and almost selfish and very disrespectful. The words "loyalty" and "trust" mean nothing it seems for some in the business.

I felt the same way when it happened to Goldsmith on TIMELINE and Shore on KING KONG.

It's just a movie for heaven's sake, not the end of the world. Everyone who ever threw out a Goldsmith, Shore or Horner or any other great score is simply an idiot. Whatever reasons. They ultimately lose. What is happening with COMMUNICATION between a composer and a director?


Nipotente, I admire your own passion, but it's misplaced. It's a director's job (and a producer's) to make the best film he knows how to make. If one of the contributors -- be it a writer, actor, costume designer, art director… what have you -- is not giving him what he needs to do that, that person has to be replaced. All these people put in their passion and sweat. But if the director (or producer, or studio head) allows that to sway what he puts in the final film, he is a weak director indeed. To use your term, he would be an idiot.

If you hire somebody to paint your house, and he paints it blue when you wanted it white, would you just accept the blue house because you didn't want to be disrespectful?

And yes, there is communication between composer and director. But sometimes, it still doesn't work out. And sometimes, a director may think a film needs one kind of music, and when the music is put to film he realizes he was wrong. Until the whole thing is finished, all anybody's doing is guessing. To not change course in this case would make the director, yes, an idiot.

Some replacement scores are (in my opinion) better. Others are worse. And some don't make a damn bit of difference. There's no one rule. I don't have any idea why you'd say they always ultimately lose.

No, it's not the end of the world. But these days, even a cheap movie costs $25 million to make, and most cost many times more than that. If a studio has put (say) $150 million into your movie, do you really think you could tell them "Well, I don't love the score, but the composer worked so hard, I'd hate to disappoint him"?

To take such a stand would make him -- that's right -- an idiot.

 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2013 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

At the end of April 2013, I was asked to write an alternate musical score for the new adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, starring Hailee Steinfeld and Douglas Booth, directed by Carlo Carlei, with a screenplay by Julian Fellowes (Downton Abbey), produced by Amber Entertainment, Swarovski Entertainment Ltd and Echo Lake Pictures.

The score was recorded at Warner Bros. Eastwood Scoring Stage in Los Angeles on June 25-28 with a 67-piece orchestra, a choir and a soprano Tamara Bevard. The violin and piano solos were performed by Roger Wilkie and Randy Kerber (both of whom worked with me on A Single Man).

I am pleased to inform you, that as of today, my score has been accepted.
-- from his facebook.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

http://www.imdb.com/list/VL4US2x9jkE/?ref_=hm_3p_vi3#lb-1

First Trailer release.

 
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