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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: The Friends of Eddie Coyle/Three Days of the Condor
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2012 - 5:48 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Been listening to 3DOTC and it's quite a contrast to Coyle. Condor is impossibly slick! Every note is ridiculously oily. It's actually a sound I once abhorred because of my dislike of "Smooth Jazz", but I appreciate this aspect of the '70s nowadays. It has less to do with nostalgia for the period and more with just how well this music is arranged and performed. I can also enjoy that sound with a fair dose of humor, too.

The lasting image I have of Eddie Coyle--even when I hear the music apart from the film--is of that oppressively drab cinematography with any hint of beauty stripped clean away.

Whenever I hear the Eddie Coyle score I feel like wearing my oft-mentioned maroon leather jacket, turtleneck, slightly-flared tan slacks, and piss-colored aviator sunglasses.

I want to be like "Mr. Connection" when I grow up. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2012 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Been listening to 3DOTC and it's quite a contrast to Coyle. Condor is impossibly slick! Every note is ridiculously oily. It's actually a sound I once abhorred because of my dislike of "Smooth Jazz", but I appreciate this aspect of the '70s nowadays. It has less to do with nostalgia for the period and more with just how well this music is arranged and performed. I can also enjoy that sound with a fair dose of humor, too.

The lasting image I have of Eddie Coyle--even when I hear the music apart from the film--is of that oppressively drab cinematography with any hint of beauty stripped clean away.

Whenever I hear the Eddie Coyle score I feel like wearing my oft-mentioned maroon leather jacket, turtleneck, slightly-flared tan slacks, and piss-colored aviator sunglasses.

I want to be like "Mr. Connection" when I grow up. wink



The love theme from "Condor" is phony as a three dollar bill. It foreshadows the love theme from the main theme of the 80's television series "Moonlighting": the saxo is too cliché.
"Condor" has good tracks, by the way. The arrangements are a bit New Age jazz.
You can skip the two songs too.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2012 - 9:20 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We understood you could get us some machine guns."

Gun Dealer Jackie Brown:
"Hey, look. You—You want to burn your fuckin' bra, all right… but what you're gonna do with a machine gun?"

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We're gonna rob a fuckin' bank."

 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2012 - 1:08 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We understood you could get us some machine guns."

Gun Dealer Jackie Brown:
"Hey, look. You—You want to burn your fuckin' bra, all right… but what you're gonna do with a machine gun?"

Far Left Activist Andrea:
"We're gonna rob a fuckin' bank."


Inspiration for the Symbionese Liberation Army, no doubt.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2012 - 5:37 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The love theme from "Condor" is phony as a three dollar bill. It foreshadows the love theme from the main theme of the 80's television series "Moonlighting": the saxo is too cliché.


For me 1975 signals the end of "New" Hollywood. They all start reading--and even worse-- believing their press clippings. Nostalgia for old Hollywood glamour permeated the second half of the '70s and the once-edgy cinema of the late '60s and early '70s gives way to heavy gloss like Condor, though it still has some fine moments, both film and score. I don't just like anybody's cliched love themes; I love Grusin's, though.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2012 - 7:16 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

The love theme from "Condor" is phony as a three dollar bill. It foreshadows the love theme from the main theme of the 80's television series "Moonlighting": the saxo is too cliché.
"Condor" has good tracks, by the way. The arrangements are a bit New Age jazz.
You can skip the two songs too.


But a cue like "Life and Death Introspection" is for me still really great 70s scoring at its best.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2012 - 12:01 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

EDDIE COYLE is the best score of the double header: no fat.
A perfect 27 minutes 50 score.

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2012 - 4:28 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

And I'll be damned if I haven't had the Theme from Condor running endlessly through my head all night--and I wasn't even holding a woman captive in her own apartment! lol Thanks, maestro Grusin!

Is it just me, or does it seem like there are very few '70s film score fans left on this board?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2012 - 5:35 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

And I'll be damned if I haven't had the Theme from Condor running endlessly through my head all night--and I wasn't even holding a woman captive in her own apartment! lol Thanks, maestro Grusin!

Is it just me, or does it seem like there are very few '70s film score fans left on this board?


The Syndicate and the Brotherhood used to silence them for good. wink

 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2012 - 5:41 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

EDDIE COYLE is the best score of the double header: no fat.
A perfect 27 minutes 50 score.


Well, I don't want to be unfair but I found Intrada's two Gil Melle CDs with Andromeda Strain and The Organization too short. But Eddie Coyle is somewhat different. This short little score is perfect in every aspect and simply a masterpiece from begin to finish. Condor is a great bonus but a CD with Coyle alone would have been a dream! So, Bravo to Lukas and all involved! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2012 - 5:42 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

For those of you who enjoy EDDIE COYLE, try THE NICKEL RIDE:

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2012 - 6:01 AM   
 By:   nitzschemorricone   (Member)

Good film. Forgot that Grusin provided the score.

I wrote about it here a few years ago:
http://knifeinthehead.blogspot.com/2009/04/nickel-ride-1974-robert-mulligan.html

For those of you who enjoy EDDIE COYLE, try THE NICKEL RIDE:

 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2012 - 7:49 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Grusin nails the mood with "Partridge Robbery/Take a Walk", a cue which manages to maintain tension so thick with funk so tight and at the same damn time! Magnificent. Shame it isn't heard in the film, though.

TFOEC is a fantastic stand-alone listen and when heard in tandem with Condor, there are times where I can hear the stylistic similarities, except when Condor's love theme comes slipping in, like Kool-Aid at a white-tie affair.

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2012 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Let's face it, Dave Grusin probably lies awake in his solid platinum bed at night, laughing a "Muhahahah!" laugh at the knowledge that "Mr. Connection" is running endlessly through the brains of four film music fanatics. I'll bet he reaches into his bedside drawer for his '70s 'stache to embellish the laughter, too.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2012 - 10:13 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Let's face it, Dave Grusin probably lies awake in his solid platinum bed at night, laughing a "Muhahahah!" laugh at the knowledge that "Mr. Connection" is running endlessly through the brains of four film music fanatics. I'll bet he reaches into his bedside drawer for his '70s 'stache to embellish the laughter, too.


"There's this heavyset guy, you know. Looks like a mick. Says he'll take anything I can deliver. I never seen such demand for guns before. Four inches, six inches, uh, Mags…"
Jackie Brown to the gun retailer in the closed down gravel plant.

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2012 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Hey, Jimbo. Gimme five - cool

 
 Posted:   Sep 2, 2012 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

I see that we're getting a new George Higgins film adaptation this fall - Killing Them Softly, based on his Cogan's Trade. Marc Streitenfeld is credited for "piano pieces and musical ambiences." Will the score measure up to Grusin's Eddie Coyle?

Just have to wait and find out, I guess. Meanwhile I'll be growing my hair long to go undercover a la Richard Jordan. Keep the good grooves going!

 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2012 - 4:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I think the heist cues on TFOEC are just superb. Maybe even inspirational enough to start a "Great Heist Cues" thread, if there isn't one already.

 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2012 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Jim Phelps wrote:Is it just me, or does it seem like there are very few '70s film score fans left on this board?

Well I'm still here Jim and I love 60s and 70s scores. I really like 'Three Days Of The Condor', such a great expanded release by FSM.

 
 Posted:   Sep 3, 2012 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jim Phelps wrote:Is it just me, or does it seem like there are very few '70s film score fans left on this board?

Well I'm still here Jim and I love 60s and 70s scores. I really like 'Three Days Of The Condor', such a great expanded release by FSM.


I hear you, pal. smile I know it sounded like I was complaining (again), but I actually like that the "Seventies Crowd"--as FSM poster Castile once called us--is a rather small contingent here. When a '60 or '70s release is announced I know right away who will chime in (Thomas, Simon Morris, chriss, et al) on those threads. Since the board has lately been dominated with a lot of posters I don't "know", the familiar names are a welcome sight, especially in regards to our shared interest.

 
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