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 Posted:   Sep 24, 2013 - 6:09 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

.
Michael Gore - One Oscar.


Who?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Thanks pp312, for proving my point yet again.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 5:08 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

I'd say Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing to anything else in the Best Original Score category, be it A Little Romance or anything else nominated that year, is probably not only the biggest Oscar disappointment and misjudgement ever in that category, but indeed the biggest in any category in any year since the Oscars began, and likely will be until the end of time. In fact, Star Trek - The Motion Picture's snub for Best Original Score outweighs all other Oscar misjudgements combined. Star Trek - The Motion Picture is not only the finest original score ever composed for a motion picture, but indeed the greatest work of human hands in the history of our species on this planet, and probably the greatest thing that exists anywhere in the universe.

If Seth MacFarlane's new show Dads somehow beat Citizen Kane for Best Picture, despite the fact that it's a TV show and therefore not even eligible for any Oscar nomination, as well as impossible to do since it came many decades after Kane and therefore could not possibly be nominated in the same year, it still would be a lesser and less inexplicable transgression than Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing for Best Original Score.

So there.
razz

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I'd say Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing to anything else in the Best Original Score category, be it A Little Romance or anything else nominated that year, is probably not only the biggest Oscar disappointment and misjudgement ever in that category, but indeed the biggest in any category in any year since the Oscars began, and likely will be until the end of time. In fact, Star Trek - The Motion Picture's snub for Best Original Score outweighs all other Oscar misjudgements combined. Star Trek - The Motion Picture is not only the finest original score ever composed for a motion picture, but indeed the greatest work of human hands in the history of our species on this planet, and probably the greatest thing that exists anywhere in the universe.



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 5:37 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Tmp

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 5:40 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

I'd say Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing to anything else in the Best Original Score category, be it A Little Romance or anything else nominated that year, is probably not only the biggest Oscar disappointment and misjudgement ever in that category, but indeed the biggest in any category in any year since the Oscars began, and likely will be until the end of time. In fact, Star Trek - The Motion Picture's snub for Best Original Score outweighs all other Oscar misjudgements combined. Star Trek - The Motion Picture is not only the finest original score ever composed for a motion picture, but indeed the greatest work of human hands in the history of our species on this planet, and probably the greatest thing that exists anywhere in the universe.



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG


Wow. Really? Ok, I was joking in my earlier post, but in all honesty I do think ST-TMP truly is an exceptional score, and your own very example - "conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes" - seems to me exactly backwards (i.e., Jerry Goldsmith's score perfectly conjures up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, while Michael Giacchino's is much more about photon torpedoes, and I do say this as someone who adores some of Giacchino's other scores). Jerry's score is actually the very first thing I'd think of when asked to think of a score that represents the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown, in fact, and I don't get any sense of that at all from the 2009 Star Trek's score (or anything else about the movie, really).

(Or were you also joking? If so, Ok - you got me. embarrassment )

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 6:00 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I'd say Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing to anything else in the Best Original Score category, be it A Little Romance or anything else nominated that year, is probably not only the biggest Oscar disappointment and misjudgement ever in that category, but indeed the biggest in any category in any year since the Oscars began, and likely will be until the end of time. In fact, Star Trek - The Motion Picture's snub for Best Original Score outweighs all other Oscar misjudgements combined. Star Trek - The Motion Picture is not only the finest original score ever composed for a motion picture, but indeed the greatest work of human hands in the history of our species on this planet, and probably the greatest thing that exists anywhere in the universe.



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG



The title music in TMP is basically martial and adventure theme, I am pretty sure that Jerry would tell us that this is what Paramount/Wise wanted. You could probably view the overture before the credits as more the 'theme' of the picture to me. I would not say that the title music really is the predominate or take away music from the picture for me. It is certainly memorable and became organically emblematic of Trek and Star Fleet after it was imbedded into Next Gen TV and lots of Trek films. It is very effectively heroic.

I have Giacchino's extended Trek 2009 score, and it is certainly a skilled and professional work, but it has little about the romance of space and exploration, at least to me. The score as a whole, while effective in the picture, is not particularly ear-wormy imbeddable, the themes are rather fractured and action riff oriented rather than internal emotional oriented to me.

There are themes in TMP that convey this wandering romance and interior life of these characters, lost love, the deep mystery of space and the death and beauty it represents, the desire to go further out yet the terror of wandering further out in the void. I do not get even a tiny fraction of that from Trek 2009 or ID.

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 6:38 AM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

In 1978...

The Boys from Brazil (Jerry Goldsmith)
Days of Heaven (Ennio Morricone)
Heaven Can Wait (Dave Grusin)
and
Superman (John Williams)


lost out to...


Midnight Express (Giorgio Moroder)!!??...


Oh, yeah...

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Which Oscar decision were you more disappointed with?

Star Trek: The Motion Picture not getting the Best Score Oscar
OR
The Mission not getting the Best Score Oscar


Would you kindly list the scores that DID win the Oscars in those respective years?

 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   Maleficio   (Member)

Which Oscar decision were you more disappointed with?

Star Trek: The Motion Picture not getting the Best Score Oscar
OR
The Mission not getting the Best Score Oscar


Would you kindly list the scores that DID win the Oscars in those respective years?


A Little Romance (Georges Delerue) 1979



Round Midnight (Herbie Hancock) 1986

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:21 AM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

In 1978...

The Boys from Brazil (Jerry Goldsmith)
Days of Heaven (Ennio Morricone)
Heaven Can Wait (Dave Grusin)
and
Superman (John Williams)


lost out to...


Midnight Express (Giorgio Moroder)!!??...


Oh, yeah...


Indeed this was the year (at the tender age of 13) that my faith and interest in Oscar died.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 7:43 AM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG


I always say that everyone has an opinion and that opinion has validity... somehow. But here's a case where I'll have to say "Dude... you just got it ALL wrong." There - I've said it.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2013 - 6:37 PM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

I'm never disappointed at Oscar decisions. To be disappointed is to accept that Oscars matter and they don't.

To me, they're just a bit of fun, not to be taken too seriously.


That's true for any discerning person, but discerning people are rare, and the fact is that when a score wins an Oscar many (most?) people believe this to be a true measure of excellence. They will buy the soundtrack CD, and even if they secretly hate it, the fact that it won an Oscar will lead them to believe their taste in music must be lacking. Studio execs and music directors will be similarly impressed and demand something along the same lines for their next picture. You can't keep rewarding crap and ignoring excellence in the public domain without a price having to ultimately be paid. Franz Waxman probably realized this when resigned from the Academy when they failed to nominate Newman's "The Robe" score. No doubt that was just the last of many frustrations.

Joe Public will believe is great what those more experienced and skilled in a particular art tell him is great. It's important that the latter give him good direction and not shirk their duties.

Of course, so far as Oscar is concerned, it would help if only those knowledgeable in a particular category were allowed to vote in that category. As Andre Previn once said, "I'm not particular interested in what Sylvester Stallone thinks is the best score that year."

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 4:40 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG


I always say that everyone has an opinion and that opinion has validity... somehow. But here's a case where I'll have to say "Dude... you just got it ALL wrong." There - I've said it.



Mr Nelson, the fact that you address me as "Dude" is enough in itself to persuade me that I needn't worry about our opinions diverging.

wink

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 4:46 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I'd say Star Trek - The Motion Picture losing to anything else in the Best Original Score category, be it A Little Romance or anything else nominated that year, is probably not only the biggest Oscar disappointment and misjudgement ever in that category, but indeed the biggest in any category in any year since the Oscars began, and likely will be until the end of time. In fact, Star Trek - The Motion Picture's snub for Best Original Score outweighs all other Oscar misjudgements combined. Star Trek - The Motion Picture is not only the finest original score ever composed for a motion picture, but indeed the greatest work of human hands in the history of our species on this planet, and probably the greatest thing that exists anywhere in the universe.



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG


Wow. Really? Ok, I was joking in my earlier post, but in all honesty I do think ST-TMP truly is an exceptional score, and your own very example - "conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes" - seems to me exactly backwards (i.e., Jerry Goldsmith's score perfectly conjures up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, while Michael Giacchino's is much more about photon torpedoes, and I do say this as someone who adores some of Giacchino's other scores). Jerry's score is actually the very first thing I'd think of when asked to think of a score that represents the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown, in fact, and I don't get any sense of that at all from the 2009 Star Trek's score (or anything else about the movie, really).

(Or were you also joking? If so, Ok - you got me. embarrassment )



Oh, I'm sorry, I don't think we've been properly introduced.... smile


 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 4:52 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

A Little Romance (Georges Delerue) 1979



Round Midnight (Herbie Hancock) 1986



Thank you!

I don't mind Delerue winning, he certainly deserved an AA. Whether A Little Romance deserved it more than ST:TMP I'm not sure, but one should never make the mistake that "lower-key" means less deserving. Mission was on TV just a couple of days ago, and Morricone's score is brilliant. One of the best of the 1980s. Sure he deserved it more than Herbie Hancock. But again, quality doesn't matter when it comes to Oscar (Michael Gore, anyone?!).

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 8:00 AM   
 By:   pp312   (Member)

A Little Romance (Georges Delerue) 1979





Well, that certainly reminded me of the vast circumferences of space--wow!

Oh wait...I'm getting confused...

smile

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 8:03 AM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)



Heh heh - nice satire. Personally, I think Giacchino's theme hits the mark better than STTMP, conjuring up the tension and anticipation of venturing into the unknown to discover who knows what, rather than a bombastic march that says little about the unknown but plenty about photon torpedoes. The two main themes, main title and Klingon, are well-enough crafted, but to me they illustrate what's on the screen rather than what's behind it. There - I've said it.

TG


I always say that everyone has an opinion and that opinion has validity... somehow. But here's a case where I'll have to say "Dude... you just got it ALL wrong." There - I've said it.



Mr Nelson, the fact that you address me as "Dude" is enough in itself to persuade me that I needn't worry about our opinions diverging.

wink


If I say then, "distinguished sir" would it make a difference?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 8:06 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

A Little Romance (Georges Delerue) 1979





Well, that certainly reminded me of the vast circumferences of space--wow!

Oh wait...I'm getting confused...

smile


It strikes me as something playing in the elevator trip up from the shoe department to the ladies fashions in the JC Penney store in 1974.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2013 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

A Little Romance (Georges Delerue) 1979

Thank you!

I don't mind Delerue winning, he certainly deserved an AA. Whether A Little Romance deserved it more than ST:TMP I'm not sure, but one should never make the mistake that "lower-key" means less deserving. Mission was on TV just a couple of days ago, and Morricone's score is brilliant. One of the best of the 1980s. Sure he deserved it more than Herbie Hancock. But again, quality doesn't matter when it comes to Oscar (Michael Gore, anyone?!).


Oh, I am really, really, really, really sure that A Little Romance did not deserve to win over TMP. It had more to do with what the A list in that day wanted playing in the background of the cocktail party than anything relating to the artistic merit of the score.

 
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