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 Posted:   Jan 3, 2013 - 7:21 PM   
 By:   Mike_H   (Member)

Ah, looks like we'll have to wait a little longer. The movie has been pushed back from March to an October 18th release date.

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2013 - 7:39 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)


...this guy again!


A portraiture trick they used to use quite often a while back.
If the face was a particularly bland one, they'd lean the subject so his hand would push up against the temple, to lift up the outside of the eyebrow to break the regularity of the features and give an illusion of intensity. Interesting to see that old technique again.


How interesting. Thanks. I'll look out for that.

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2013 - 9:10 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Ah, looks like we'll have to wait a little longer. The movie has been pushed back from March to an October 18th release date.

At least this will give Beltrami more time to polish his score...

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2013 - 1:31 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

I hope the move does not indicate trouble about the movie.

Basically, to release a horror movie around Halloween makes more sense, of course. And it never really worked for me, having CARRIE out in spring.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2013 - 10:23 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Ah, looks like we'll have to wait a little longer. The movie has been pushed back from March to an October 18th release date.

Really? According to who/what?
IMDB still lists original release date March 15th.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2013 - 11:26 AM   
 By:   Juan Carlos García Cortés   (Member)

Ah, looks like we'll have to wait a little longer. The movie has been pushed back from March to an October 18th release date.

Really? According to who/what?
IMDB still lists original release date March 15th.


According to Sony Pictures

http://www.imdb.com/news/ni44080262/

Best!

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2013 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

I'm thinking the delay could be to get Julianne Moore a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination. The original Carrie got Sissy Spacek and Piper Laurie nominations and Kimberly Peirce previously directed Hilary Swank's Oscar-winning performance in Boys Don't Cry so it wouldn't be too unusual.

 
 Posted:   Jan 4, 2013 - 11:49 AM   
 By:   La La Land Records   (Member)

Ah, looks like we'll have to wait a little longer. The movie has been pushed back from March to an October 18th release date.

Really? According to who/what?
IMDB still lists original release date March 15th.


Here is just one place:

http://www.joblo.com/movie-news/carrie-remake-delayed-until-october-2013-plus-a-low-res-peek-at-the-new-poster

 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Heard the score yesterday. I love Beltrami's horror scores and this is no exception! Definitely not just another Beltrami horror score, he has once again managed to craft something wholly unique in the horror/thriller genre, aided by the fertile narrative influence of this story and the possibilities it offers.

Some nice guitar, some wistful emotional passages that seem to encapsulate how Carrie the character would feel, isolated and yearning. Beltrami brings back the "payneful piano" sound he started with Max Payne and continued with My Soul to Take...it's one of my favorite, most effective sounds Beltrami has come up with. A sort of processed detuned piano. Works really well in Carrie. When the orchestral fireworks are released towards the end of the score, it's phenomenal stuff, rip-roaring and densely intelligent writing.

A lot of it felt like 70's horror music, particularly Goldsmith, but not in the grand gothic Don't Be Afraid of the Dark mold. More softer musical innocence of a young girl contrasted with the horror she unleashes in a way Goldsmith might have scored it in the 70's. The score was occasionally reminiscent of early 80's pretty orchestral horror music, like what might accompany the opening credits. I want to say something like Richard Band? Didn't he write some attractive main title music for cheesy 80's horror films? Also, the electronic bits felt to me like some 90's Goldsmith the way they are balanced with the orchestra. I feel like Beltrami does a better job blending the two than Goldsmith did in the 90's, which isn't to take away from Goldsmith's work whatsoever.

There were a few moments that reminded me of Herrmann thriller music, more kind of quieter atmosphere like something from Cape Fear.

A few synth sounds sounded old school too, like 70's or 80's synth. Not a lot, but some. A particularly creepy noise reminded me a lot of a sound Harry Manfredini used in Jason Lives, sort of a twisted bell/music box noise. There are a few sounds in Carrie that evoke this bell/music box type of creepy/innocent mischief. Very effective.

Some nice female vocal in the score too and a terrific, catchy theme that I assume is Carrie's. It's a great character theme, I might even put it up there with Sid's theme from Scream, it has a similar haunting, lonely, poetic quality (although female vocals do not accompany Carrie's theme).

I mentioned a lot of things Carrie reminds me of, but that's just for a reference point...I strongly point out that the score carries a distinct identity all its own, but it does evoke some of my favorite past horror works here and there.

Probably the most accomplished aspect of the score is how well Beltrami blends youthful innocence and yearning with the nightmare it can become at a moment's notice. Beltrami skillfully bounces back and forth between musically achieved youthful innocence and carefree teenage experience and the horror just beneath the surface and how even though they seem so different from each other, they are more similar than you'd think. Hard to put into words. The softer innocent music takes on a subtle menace that grows horrifically until sometimes you realize it had been there all along. Sometimes the addition of a particular sound or instrument can sharply turn a corner from softer bucolic carefree tone to sinister.

Don't remember Donaggio's music from the original film so can't draw any comparisons or contrasts.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 1:54 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Nice write up Deputy, looking forward to hearing it smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 2:51 AM   
 By:   Synchrotones   (Member)

Really loving Beltrami's output lately (well... and always have). Looking forward to Carrie, especially after Deputy's report.

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 4:00 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Heard the score yesterday. I love Beltrami's horror scores and this is no exception! Definitely not just another Beltrami horror score, he has once again managed to craft something wholly unique in the horror/thriller genre, aided by the fertile narrative influence of this story and the possibilities it offers.

Some nice guitar, some wistful emotional passages that seem to encapsulate how Carrie the character would feel, isolated and yearning. Beltrami brings back the "payneful piano" sound he started with Max Payne and continued with My Soul to Take...it's one of my favorite, most effective sounds Beltrami has come up with. A sort of processed detuned piano. Works really well in Carrie. When the orchestral fireworks are released towards the end of the score, it's phenomenal stuff, rip-roaring and densely intelligent writing.

A lot of it felt like 70's horror music, particularly Goldsmith, but not in the grand gothic Don't Be Afraid of the Dark mold. More softer musical innocence of a young girl contrasted with the horror she unleashes in a way Goldsmith might have scored it in the 70's. The score was occasionally reminiscent of early 80's pretty orchestral horror music, like what might accompany the opening credits. I want to say something like Richard Band? Didn't he write some attractive main title music for cheesy 80's horror films? Also, the electronic bits felt to me like some 90's Goldsmith the way they are balanced with the orchestra. I feel like Beltrami does a better job blending the two than Goldsmith did in the 90's, which isn't to take away from Goldsmith's work whatsoever.

There were a few moments that reminded me of Herrmann thriller music, more kind of quieter atmosphere like something from Cape Fear.

A few synth sounds sounded old school too, like 70's or 80's synth. Not a lot, but some. A particularly creepy noise reminded me a lot of a sound Harry Manfredini used in Jason Lives, sort of a twisted bell/music box noise. There are a few sounds in Carrie that evoke this bell/music box type of creepy/innocent mischief. Very effective.

Some nice female vocal in the score too and a terrific, catchy theme that I assume is Carrie's. It's a great character theme, I might even put it up there with Sid's theme from Scream, it has a similar haunting, lonely, poetic quality (although female vocals do not accompany Carrie's theme).

I mentioned a lot of things Carrie reminds me of, but that's just for a reference point...I strongly point out that the score carries a distinct identity all its own, but it does evoke some of my favorite past horror works here and there.

Probably the most accomplished aspect of the score is how well Beltrami blends youthful innocence and yearning with the nightmare it can become at a moment's notice. Beltrami skillfully bounces back and forth between musically achieved youthful innocence and carefree teenage experience and the horror just beneath the surface and how even though they seem so different from each other, they are more similar than you'd think. Hard to put into words. The softer innocent music takes on a subtle menace that grows horrifically until sometimes you realize it had been there all along. Sometimes the addition of a particular sound or instrument can sharply turn a corner from softer bucolic carefree tone to sinister.

Don't remember Donaggio's music from the original film so can't draw any comparisons or contrasts.


A big thank you for this report! Can´t wait to hear the score myself!

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 6:43 AM   
 By:   Lokutus   (Member)

Have you heard the complete score or some possible future CD master of some sort?
Fingers crossed there will be one when the time comes smile

 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 7:02 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Have you heard the complete score or some possible future CD master of some sort?
Fingers crossed there will be one when the time comes smile


It was complete. Also hoping for a score release!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 8:01 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)



A lot of it felt like 70's horror music, particularly Goldsmith, but not in the grand gothic Don't Be Afraid of the Dark mold. More softer musical innocence of a young girl contrasted with the horror she unleashes in a way Goldsmith might have scored it in the 70's. The score was occasionally reminiscent of early 80's pretty orchestral horror music, like what might accompany the opening credits. I want to say something like Richard Band? Didn't he write some attractive main title music for cheesy 80's horror films? Also, the electronic bits felt to me like some 90's Goldsmith the way they are balanced with the orchestra. I feel like Beltrami does a better job blending the two than Goldsmith did in the 90's, which isn't to take away from Goldsmith's work whatsoever.


Oh man, the kind of melodic horror writing Richard Band did on stuff like MUTANT, THE ALCHEMIST, HOUSE ON SORORITY ROW, etc. is just fantastic. And the Goldsmith mode of writing you're referring to - Could I infer you're alluding to the softer portions of THE OMEN?

Holy crap I'm excited for this score! I love this kind of stuff...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2013 - 9:33 PM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

Heard the score yesterday. I love Beltrami's horror scores and this is no exception! Definitely not just another Beltrami horror score, he has once again managed to craft something wholly unique in the horror/thriller genre, aided by the fertile narrative influence of this story and the possibilities it offers.

Some nice guitar, some wistful emotional passages that seem to encapsulate how Carrie the character would feel, isolated and yearning. Beltrami brings back the "payneful piano" sound he started with Max Payne and continued with My Soul to Take...it's one of my favorite, most effective sounds Beltrami has come up with. A sort of processed detuned piano. Works really well in Carrie. When the orchestral fireworks are released towards the end of the score, it's phenomenal stuff, rip-roaring and densely intelligent writing.

A lot of it felt like 70's horror music, particularly Goldsmith, but not in the grand gothic Don't Be Afraid of the Dark mold. More softer musical innocence of a young girl contrasted with the horror she unleashes in a way Goldsmith might have scored it in the 70's. The score was occasionally reminiscent of early 80's pretty orchestral horror music, like what might accompany the opening credits. I want to say something like Richard Band? Didn't he write some attractive main title music for cheesy 80's horror films? Also, the electronic bits felt to me like some 90's Goldsmith the way they are balanced with the orchestra. I feel like Beltrami does a better job blending the two than Goldsmith did in the 90's, which isn't to take away from Goldsmith's work whatsoever.

There were a few moments that reminded me of Herrmann thriller music, more kind of quieter atmosphere like something from Cape Fear.

A few synth sounds sounded old school too, like 70's or 80's synth. Not a lot, but some. A particularly creepy noise reminded me a lot of a sound Harry Manfredini used in Jason Lives, sort of a twisted bell/music box noise. There are a few sounds in Carrie that evoke this bell/music box type of creepy/innocent mischief. Very effective.

Some nice female vocal in the score too and a terrific, catchy theme that I assume is Carrie's. It's a great character theme, I might even put it up there with Sid's theme from Scream, it has a similar haunting, lonely, poetic quality (although female vocals do not accompany Carrie's theme).

I mentioned a lot of things Carrie reminds me of, but that's just for a reference point...I strongly point out that the score carries a distinct identity all its own, but it does evoke some of my favorite past horror works here and there.

Probably the most accomplished aspect of the score is how well Beltrami blends youthful innocence and yearning with the nightmare it can become at a moment's notice. Beltrami skillfully bounces back and forth between musically achieved youthful innocence and carefree teenage experience and the horror just beneath the surface and how even though they seem so different from each other, they are more similar than you'd think. Hard to put into words. The softer innocent music takes on a subtle menace that grows horrifically until sometimes you realize it had been there all along. Sometimes the addition of a particular sound or instrument can sharply turn a corner from softer bucolic carefree tone to sinister.

Don't remember Donaggio's music from the original film so can't draw any comparisons or contrasts.



Feels like you're damning this score with faint praise. And I say this as a massive fan of Beltrami and his colleagues (Trumpp, Torjussen, etc.).

Comparable to "My Soul to Take"? Not in the same vein as "Don't be afraid of the dark"? The female vocal he liked to recycle again and again in his early years from "Scream" to "The Watcher"?

I get the impression that this score will sound like Women in Black, effective but forgettable in the end, like tears in the rain, among Beltrami's vast sea of horror scores.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2013 - 1:27 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Strange. I get the impression that this score is one more masterpiece.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2013 - 7:57 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Oh man, the kind of melodic horror writing Richard Band did on stuff like MUTANT, THE ALCHEMIST, HOUSE ON SORORITY ROW, etc. is just fantastic. And the Goldsmith mode of writing you're referring to - Could I infer you're alluding to the softer portions of THE OMEN?

That's it, I was thinking of The House on Sorority Row. It's not the clearest memory, but I felt hints of that main title music in Carrie.

Will have to get back to you on the Goldsmith, it was a feeling in general but I've had trouble identifying which score comes to mind the most.

 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2013 - 8:03 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

Feels like you're damning this score with faint praise. And I say this as a massive fan of Beltrami and his colleagues (Trumpp, Torjussen, etc.).

Comparable to "My Soul to Take"? Not in the same vein as "Don't be afraid of the dark"? The female vocal he liked to recycle again and again in his early years from "Scream" to "The Watcher"?


I am very unsure how you are getting all of that negativity about the score from what I've written. I'm sorry you missed my appreciation for this score, or otherwise I failed to make it clear, but I love Carrie. It's awesome. WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin's impression is closest to the mark.

If I were to compare it to MSTT, that would be a high compliment, because I love that score immensely. I'm not though; just saying that both scores feature the payneful piano. And I should amend what I said about female vocal, there are no solo vocals in the score, they are female chorus. I misspoke. Mistyped. Also, just because I said it's not in the same mold of DBA doesn't mean it isn't in the same league as DBA...and the two do share a certain lyrical similarity now that I reflect further...

My recommendation, just hold off your judgment and predictions of the score until you've heard it, it really is impressive stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 29, 2013 - 11:01 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)



I am very unsure how you are getting all of that negativity about the score from what I've written. I'm sorry you missed my appreciation for this score, or otherwise I failed to make it clear, but I love Carrie. It's awesome. WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin's impression is closest to the mark.

If I were to compare it to MSTT, that would be a high compliment, because I love that score immensely. I'm not though; just saying that both scores feature the payneful piano. And I should amend what I said about female vocal, there are no solo vocals in the score, they are female chorus. I misspoke. Mistyped. Also, just because I said it's not in the same mold of DBA doesn't mean it isn't in the same league as DBA...and the two do share a certain lyrical similarity now that I reflect further...

My recommendation, just hold off your judgment and predictions of the score until you've heard it, it really is impressive stuff.


Female chorus? Now we're talking. Hopefully it's not too Elfman-like.

Still worried about the MSTT and Max Payne similarity though. Those two are pretty "meh" to me, especially MSTT. I can't remember anything about it. I guess it's catelogued in my subconsciousness together with Capivity Amusement Park and Cursed etc. as one of those good but not exceptional scores.

Anyway, hopefully Marco does something awesome with Carrie and Snow Piercer. I expected phenomenal things with WWZ and Wolverine and I was a little disappointed. So I'm going to set the expectation low and be pleasantly surprised.

 
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