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 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 3:21 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

Basil, did you get the Bogart disc? If so, could you check track 3, TREASURE OF SIERRE MADRE, and let me know if there's a "wow" on the first chord? It's very noticeable on my copy and I'm not sure if it's a flaw in all of them or just mine.

I don't hear wow, but I think what you are hearing is just the way the instruments are blending at that point.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I thought the Rozsa album was one of the worst in the series. The selections don't represent Rozsa at his finest, nor do I care for Gerhardt's interpretations.


Each to his own. I really like the Rozsa disc, & the Red House suite is a big favorite. He takes the love theme from The Thief Of Bagdad far too slow, but that's my only complaint. I'm so pleased to hear that they've remastered them. I thought they'd just shove them out with a new cover. Well done RCA.

 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 4:30 PM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

I still have the entire series on LP and never bought the previous CD re-issues. I still listen to the LPs every so often and wonder if these latest CD re-issues are worth me picking up or not? I'm no longer as fussy as I was as a younger man with sound issues, it's the music and performances that I'm mostly about now and those won't change with the re-issues. A cleaner sound without the nearly 40 years of accumulated surface noises would be nice. I expect mixed opinions to the LP versus CD question, but am open to any input to get something of a feel for it. Thanks!

 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 4:32 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I thought the Rozsa album was one of the worst in the series. The selections don't represent Rozsa at his finest, nor do I care for Gerhardt's interpretations.



Disagree. I love the brief but wonderful Jungle Book track, and The Red House suite is spectacularly fine, worth the price of the disc on its own.

 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 4:38 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

let me know if there's a "wow" on the first chord? It's very noticeable on my copy and I'm not sure if it's a flaw in all of them or just mine.

Serious question (i.e. I'm not being a wiseass): Is it possible for "wow" to be on one copy of a CD and not another? Sure, digital break-up could be the result of a faultily pressed disc, and be unique to yours or a specific batch. But I would have to believe (and again, I'm not an expert) that "wow" is not the sort of thing that could vary within a pressing run of a CD.

If I'm wrong, I'm sure somebody will let me know.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 4:54 PM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Shameless plug: I'm doing reviews of all six of the current batch over at http://FilmScoreClickTrack.com.

The next batch of releases is due in March.

Never mind. Be nice if FSM had a delete your own message

 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 6:20 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

Mine have arrived. Superb! Very substantial improvement in sound over the previous CDs.

Basil, did you get the Bogart disc? If so, could you check track 3, TREASURE OF SIERRE MADRE, and let me know if there's a "wow" on the first chord? It's very noticeable on my copy and I'm not sure if it's a flaw in all of them or just mine.

Thanks
Jim


I hear that too and it's not on the Dolby version. That's a shame.

 
 Posted:   Oct 28, 2010 - 8:57 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

We all assume that going back to the original tapes is the best thing to do, but isn't it sometimes the case that (say) a fifteen year old old CD has benefited from being originally mastered when the tapes were less deteriorated than now and that a new remaster from the same tapes today will likely have more flaws than the old CD?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 8:55 AM   
 By:   sdtom   (Member)

I still have the entire series on LP and never bought the previous CD re-issues. I still listen to the LPs every so often and wonder if these latest CD re-issues are worth me picking up or not? I'm no longer as fussy as I was as a younger man with sound issues, it's the music and performances that I'm mostly about now and those won't change with the re-issues. A cleaner sound without the nearly 40 years of accumulated surface noises would be nice. I expect mixed opinions to the LP versus CD question, but am open to any input to get something of a feel for it. Thanks!

When I think of the dollars I spent on audio equipment over the years I could have bought a beautiful house which I didn't do which was stupid in my opinion. When it was all done I complained about the room acoustics because I wanted that perfect sound. I finally realized that the closest way to achieving perfection was to attend live concerts. Like Mark I have the complete set on LP and CD and have no desire to spend money for a set I already own. Grateful to have what I have. My ears have aged along with me.
Thomas

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Well, as someone who was born around the time CDs became commercially available, and only had maybe three or four of the original discs and had been waffling over whether to get the ArkivMusic versions or expensive second-hand copies of some of the others, I'm very happy that these have been released. Of the three I've listened to -- Captain Blood, Captain from Castile and Casablanca -- they mostly sound great to me so far, except for some bits on the Alfred Newman disc, and are very attractive presentations of the music.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

"I thought the Rozsa album was one of the worst in the series. The selections don't represent Rozsa at his finest, nor do I care for Gerhardt's interpretations."

It's always fascinating to hear what other people think. For me, the Rozsa is one of the best albums in the series, and easily the one I've listened to the most through the years. It's the album I always recommend to people who don't know Rozsa but are interested in finding out more about him.

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   Michael Condon   (Member)

"I thought the Rozsa album was one of the worst in the series. The selections don't represent Rozsa at his finest, nor do I care for Gerhardt's interpretations."

It's always fascinating to hear what other people think. For me, the Rozsa is one of the best albums in the series, and easily the one I've listened to the most through the years. It's the album I always recommend to people who don't know Rozsa but are interested in finding out more about him.


I think that is the album I played most outside of GWTW. It really turned me on to Rozsa's beautiful melodies and harmonies. My early days in college in the 80's were spent with his music being played on my Walkman as I poured over all of the works I had to memorize in my art history classes. My collection is rich with Rozsa!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

I thought the Rozsa album was one of the worst in the series. The selections don't represent Rozsa at his finest, nor do I care for Gerhardt's interpretations.


I don't think it was the worst in the series - I reserve that for the Alfred Newman album - but I agree that the Rozsa album was not one of the best. As Derek Elley very well put it when reviewing the discs back in 1977; "Gerhardt as conductor was always most successful in the series with the great washes of Steiner and Korngold or the sheer brutality of Herrmann. Rozsa's music demands a very special kind of ability to make an orchestra sing without losing rythmic momentum, and the composer's well-known lack of sentiment when conducting his own works makes Gerhardt seem pale in comparison".

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 11:12 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

Most listeners at the time thought that the Red House Suite, somewhat reordered by Gerhardt and played with greater emphasis by a much larger orchestra, was a vast improvement on Rozsa's old Capitol version.

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 6:41 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

I don't think there's a single bad suite on the Rozsa album. 'Red House', 'Double Indemnity'. 'Jungle Book' and 'Four Feathers' are sublime. The others are at LEAST adequate, and far better than most re-recordings.

The 'Thief of Baghdad' piece is from the concert suite and as such can be legitimately taken at whatever tempo brings out the music's feel, 'Ivanhoe' has the wonderful full orchestral original Prologue music not heard in the film print, and some spectacular enhancements to the Finale, the 'Knights of the Round Table' scherzo positively glitters despite the fake ending, and both 'The Lost Weekend' and 'Spellbound' are steeped in that wonderful grey sombreness that Rozsa often pulled out for the 1940s noir scores. Rozsa was present at the recordings and supervised the revisions here and there, such as the great choral line for the JB suite.

It's not the most 'famous' or 'representative' of his film material, unlike most of the other composers' compilations, but along with the Polydor albums, there was always a higher representation of his works on discs. It's a 'serious' music album, not a mere quickie sampler.

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 6:47 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Most listeners at the time thought that the Red House Suite, somewhat reordered by Gerhardt and played with greater emphasis by a much larger orchestra, was a vast improvement on Rozsa's old Capitol version.

It was one, if not the highlight(s) of that recording. Powerful, intense and hair raising.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 7:13 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

I recently sent the CD to actress Allene Roberts, a close friend of mine, who starred as Meg in that picture. She had only known about the old Capitol version of the music, and she was absolutely thrilled hearing the RCA take on it. She didn't meet Rozsa, as he was only involved in post-production, but she loved Edward G. Robinson, Rory Calhoun, and Julie London. Lon McCallister, who played her boyfriend in the picture, remained one of her closest personal friends as a result of that picture, until his death just a few years ago. She said the two were like brother and sister, and along with the music I think their two performances are at the heart of why the film's so special. It's a superb picture in dire need of a quality restoration if that's at all possible given its PD status. One of my dreams to to someday re-record the entire score. I think the 120 people who would be interested in buying such a release would be very happy with that!

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2010 - 8:46 PM   
 By:   Jim Lochner   (Member)

I don't hear wow, but I think what you are hearing is just the way the instruments are blending at that point.

Mine is a serious dip in pitch by at least a quarter tone. I wish it was a simple blend, but it's an electronic mishap...at least on mine. Bummer.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 4:38 AM   
 By:   Brian D. Mellies   (Member)

......OMG, I just quickly listened to some tracks on my copies of both Sea Hawk and Sunset Boulevard w/headphones on. I have both editions (Dolby/ Non-Dolby) and the sound quality of the Non-Dolby recordings is LIGHTYEARS better!! I think I should've listened to them more often... Why did they ever do this "Dolby-stuff" in the first place and ruin those recordings?... so now I think I'll have to buy them all over again. frown ... (not that I don't have enough CDs already to listen to...)

For a while, the word "Dolby" was magical as it was being incorporated into the film industry (Presented in Dolby Stereo; Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo; Dolby Digital, etc.).

Reminds me of the days when "Digital" was coming into being. Everything was digital. I fully expected my breakfast cereal box to say "Rice Krispies, Now they're DIGITAL!".

Ya gotta have a gimmick.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 31, 2010 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   Brian D. Mellies   (Member)

.... As Derek Elley very well put it when reviewing the discs back in 1977; "Gerhardt as conductor was always most successful in the series with the great washes of Steiner and Korngold or the sheer brutality of Herrmann. Rozsa's music demands a very special kind of ability to make an orchestra sing without losing rhythmic momentum, and the composer's well-known lack of sentiment when conducting his own works makes Gerhardt seem pale in comparison".

While I'm not in total agreement regarding Mr. Gerhardt, I do agree that, at least generally speaking, Dr. Rozsa as conductor makes a most convincing argument for his music. Not that Steiner is any less so, but Rozsa's music is so quintessentially European. As we know, Mr. Gerhardt never conducted outside the recording studio, which I've always found odd.

By the way, regarding the quality of Mr. Gerhardt's conducting, remember that Bernard Herrmann and Miklos Rozsa sat in on their respective recording sessions. In fact, I recall the liner notes on the Herrmann LP telling us Gerhardt was having trouble conducting something in the Herrmann sessions (don't remember what). Herrmann grabbed some blank sheet music, and in a few minutes had written a transition to replace the one Gerhardt was having trouble with. Being his usual lovable self, he said something to the effect of "Here. This is how it's supposed to sound."

 
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