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 Posted:   Aug 4, 2015 - 5:40 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

Part of Paramount Picture's ongoing Historical CDs preservation efforts. Artwork courtesy Universal Pictures.

I wonder what exactly that means - are they going to make soundtracks more accessible to the labels? Soundtracks from all eras? And did Paramount do the clean-up on the tracks?


Just have a look here:
http://www.filmmusicsociety.org/special/paramount_archive.html


five tons of music

FIVE GRAVES has got to be in there.

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2015 - 5:45 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Manderley, thanks for the list. That's a lot of titles!

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2015 - 7:20 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

....and likely a few others I've missed.


THE BUCCANEER (Kritzerland)
THE CARPETBAGGERS (Intrada)
THE JAYHAWKERS! (Intrada)
ROBINSON CRUSOE ON MARS (Film Score Monthly)
TRUE GRIT (La-La Land)



Thanks for adding those, Bob D.

That makes it, by my count, 66 titles, now including DESERT FURY.


I forgot:

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S (Intrada)
HATARI! (Intrada)
HELL IS FOR HEROES / ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (Intrada)
LADY IN A CAGE (Kritzerland)
THE PRESIDENT'S ANALYST / MAN ON A SWING (Quartet)
ROSEMARY'S BABY (La-La Land)
SECONDS (La-La Land)
THE SPACE CHILDREN / THE COLOSSUS OF NEW YORK (Film Score Monthly)
THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD (Intrada)
SUNSET BLVD. (Counterpoint)
WARNING SHOT (La-La Land)

And since MAN ON A SWING and ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ go into the 1970's, from that decade there is also:

THE BIG BUS (Film Score Monthly)
BLACK SUNDAY (Film Score Monthly)
CHILD'S PLAY / FIRSTBORN (Intrada)
DAYS OF HEAVEN (Film Score Monthly)
THE FRIENDS OF EDDIE COYLE / THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR (Film Score Monthly)
THE GAMBLER (Quartet)
HEAVEN CAN WAIT / RACING WITH THE MOON (Kritzerland)
JOSEPH ANDREWS (Kritzerland)
KING KONG (Film Score Monthly)
MANDINGO / PLAZA SUITE (Intrada)
THE MOLLY MAGUIRES (Kritzerland)
NORTH DALLAS FORTY (Film Score Monthly)
ONCE IS NOT ENOUGH (Intrada)
THE PARALLAX VIEW / THE MARATHON MAN (Film Score Monthly)
POSSE / THE LAST TYCOON (Intrada)
PROPHECY (Film Score Monthly)
THE SHOOTIST (La-La Land)
THE WHITE DAWN (Intrada)
WON TON TON: THE DOG WHO SAVED HOLLYWOOD (Kritzerland)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2015 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

It's interesting that Paramount appear to have retained the music rights to the films they sold to Universal (i.e. pre 1948 sound films other than Hal Wallis productions) which of course wasn't the case with the M-G-M films sold to Turner and now fortunately in the hands of Warner Bros.


The Film Music Society article linked to above states:

"Although Paramount Pictures sold its pre-1948 films to MCA, the studio still maintains the publishing rights to the music for all the films it produced – from Mission: Impossible to The Ten Commandments to hundreds of others – through its publishing affiliate, Famous Music Corporation."

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2015 - 7:33 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Part of Paramount Picture's ongoing Historical CDs preservation efforts. Artwork courtesy Universal Pictures.

I wonder what exactly that means - are they going to make soundtracks more accessible to the labels? Soundtracks from all eras? And did Paramount do the clean-up on the tracks?


Just have a look here:
http://www.filmmusicsociety.org/special/paramount_archive.html


five tons of music

FIVE GRAVES has got to be in there.



It should be noted that the 1995 archiving project described in the linked Film Music Society article related only to orchestral scores and parts, composers' sketches, notes, conductor books, etc.--in other words to paper documents, not to tapes or recordings. While it's not clear when the studio became serious about preserving its recorded library, it's only been in the last half dozen years or so that Paramount has moved into releasing its recordings to the public.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 5:55 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

is it me or does Lizabeth Scott look like Bogart in drag? Not because of the particular photo, but in general?


Honestly, I think you need to cut down on you hallucinogenics.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 6:49 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

It should be noted that the 1995 archiving project described in the linked Film Music Society article related only to orchestral scores and parts, composers' sketches, notes, conductor books, etc.--in other words to paper documents, not to tapes or recordings. While it's not clear when the studio became serious about preserving its recorded library, it's only been in the last half dozen years or so that Paramount has moved into releasing its recordings to the public.

thanks, Bob. Now that I read that FMS page, I recall seeing it before when I was searching something. Anyway, I'll ask over on Intrada what they meant by Historical CDs.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 6:58 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

Are my eyes glossing over Sol Kaplan's Judith on that list? Strange to add Kaplan's Spy score (which feels more Silver Age) but not that...

Yavar

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Are my eyes glossing over Sol Kaplan's Judith on that list? Strange to add Kaplan's Spy score (which feels more Silver Age) but not that...

Yavar



The original purpose of Manderley's list was to celebrate "titles from the Paramount vaults." According to Intrada, the sources for the JUDITH CD were the "1/4" mono masters housed in [the] Sol Kaplan Collection at [the] University of Wyoming" and RCA's "original stereo album masters." The sources for THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD, however, were the "original 35mm three channel scoring session[s]" "from the master elements stored at Paramount," as well as RCA's "original stereo album master tapes." Given that both projects went forward with Paramount's blessing, perhaps it's picky to distinguish between the two, but the fact is that one was "from the Paramount vaults" and one was not.

For similar reasons, some other recent releases from Paramount films did not make my expanded list of releases from 1970s films:

  • Quartet's SHANKS, which, although done "in collaboration with Paramount Pictures," was "mastered from ¼" monaural tapes housed in the Alex North collection in the Margaret Herrick Library at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences."

  • Film Score Monthly's ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, which was sourced from Bruce Kimmel's "personal ¼" stereo tape copy . . . of the original music masters (which are now apparently lost)."

  •  
     Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 10:43 AM   
     By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

    Okay, its omission makes sense in that context. Thanks for the clarification.

    Yavar

     
     Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 11:54 AM   
     By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

    Are my eyes glossing over Sol Kaplan's Judith on that list? Strange to add Kaplan's Spy score (which feels more Silver Age) but not that...

    Yavar



    The original purpose of Manderley's list was to celebrate "titles from the Paramount vaults." According to Intrada, the sources for the JUDITH CD were the "1/4" mono masters housed in [the] Sol Kaplan Collection at [the] University of Wyoming" and RCA's "original stereo album masters." The sources for THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD, however, were the "original 35mm three channel scoring session[s]" "from the master elements stored at Paramount," as well as RCA's "original stereo album master tapes." Given that both projects went forward with Paramount's blessing, perhaps it's picky to distinguish between the two, but the fact is that one was "from the Paramount vaults" and one was not.

    For similar reasons, some other recent releases from Paramount films did not make my expanded list of releases from 1970s films:

  • Quartet's SHANKS, which, although done "in collaboration with Paramount Pictures," was "mastered from ¼" monaural tapes housed in the Alex North collection in the Margaret Herrick Library at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences."

  • Film Score Monthly's ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, which was sourced from Bruce Kimmel's "personal ¼" stereo tape copy . . . of the original music masters (which are now apparently lost)."

    ONE EYED JACKS on Manderley's list didn't come from Paramount's vaults either. The CD came from from tapes held by Capitol Records, as stated on the CD. Presumably Paramount still have the original masters though.

  •  
     
     Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 4:48 PM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    ONE EYED JACKS on Manderley's list didn't come from Paramount's vaults either. The CD came from from tapes held by Capitol Records, as stated on the CD. Presumably Paramount still have the original masters though.


    Apparently, this was the same type of situation as Intrada also found at Capitol (a few years later with CROMWELL)--more music was in the Capitol vaults than had been used for the LP.

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 4:49 PM   
     By:   manderley   (Member)

    .....The original purpose of Manderley's list was to celebrate "titles from the Paramount vaults.".....

    Actually, while Manderley WAS celebrating Golden Age titles from Paramount films, he was using the term "titles from the Paramount vaults" in a far-more-general movie-industry way than most of you are.

    For instance, Manderley might say that the video releases of HONDO, McLINTOCK, THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY, etc, came from "the Paramount vaults" when, in fact, they are owned and controlled by the John Wayne Estate and Paramount only licensed, supervised, and distributed these films on video for the Wayne estate, with Paramount taking their cut, and applying the Paramount trademark and release information to the packaging.

    And, of course, we all know (don't we?) that the term "vault" as it relates to the film industry represents a pretty lazy application of the word when we understand that valuable film materials have sometimes been stored in unheated-uncooled warehouses, off the lot, and eventually abandoned....in leaky glass enclosed silent soundstages.....in broom closets off the main room of the makeup department....in film executive office closets with the writing pens and reams of typing paper......in the storage vaults of bankrupt film labs......in empty trunks of cars of daily employees driving off the lot.....in the homes and libraries of directors, producers, composers, cameramen, performers who accessed, by signed contract or not, rare copies or outtakes of the materials for their home use.....in cheesy corrugated-tin outbuildings subject to errant fires (think Universal here).....in concrete, non air-conditioned, nitrate vaults built on the dusty backlot and left with the safety steel doors wide-open, allowing dust, rainshowers, and hot and cold air to circulate year-round (think old MGM here).....in cans piled on the floors of concrete buildings whose fire-sprinklers go off, spraying all the cans that aren't sealed and/or dripped on by the unmaintained roof leaks, with the first foot of flooring (where the cans are stacked) becoming a mini-lake (think private rental vaults around town).....in the closets, backrooms, storage buildings of off-the-lot production houses who have accessed the one-of-a-kind material for a project and never returned it.....in the abandoned, forgotten, locked room of an equipment storage building on the lot which no one has accessed for 50 years.....in a special effects soundstage where a miniatures tank has leaked water into the basement storage room for years and years......

    Well......the list goes on-and-on.

    Manderley's view is that the term "the Paramount vaults".....the "20th Century-Fox vaults".....or anybody's "vaults".....primarily refers to the legal ownership of the materials and contracts and the entity where someone has to go to get permission to use ANY materials from a project and who must sign off on everything, whether recorded or visual material, art images (stills, ads, etc), print material (script quotes, publicity promo), or artists' rights.

    Though it is always wonderful when first-generation material---particularly that which has been stored at the studio and properly maintained---can be used for a project, that's often not the case. Material can be many decades old and living in a record company's library.....or as a rare original in someone's closet.....or archived at a US University, a Museum, a National Archive.....or an out-of-the way foreign archive.....or being sold by a private individual on eBay.....or kept by the heirs of a creator who don't know what to do with it.

    As more and more material is scattered to the four winds, Manderley believes that if a studio is continuously attached to a project by its name and contractual sign-off, then that material comes from that studio's "vault"---whether it actually, physically, does or not---and whether it is the actual original material or simply the last surviving copy.

    And, for the filmmusic market, we're lucky that most of our big producers are willing to spend money and time to track down and piece together the material from various sources to get the final job done, and then work to get the final permissions from the owners and creators of the material.

    Some of the studios now have programs in place to preserve a selection of ancillary filmmaking materials from today and yesterday (and we're lucky for that)......and some do not (and it's sad how much has already been trashed or lost). But considering that the primary work of the movie studio is simply to make a program of movies each year, it really is amazing that so much of the extra material and working detritus of the filmmaking process has been saved---whether we pulled it from an actual vault or not.

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 5, 2015 - 4:55 PM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    So I guess JUDITH goes on the list.smile

     
     Posted:   Aug 7, 2015 - 1:37 PM   
     By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

    Curiously, these samples hit more close to home for me than Lost Weekend, maybe because of the Koch suite I'm familiar with, maybe because I'm an outlier as far as the movie goes (I'm not much on Hollywood treatment of addiction, even when Billy Wilder tackles it). Whatever the reason, Desert Fury is an immediate buy, and LW is on the list but will have to wait a bit.

    This is MY kind of Rozsa!

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 7, 2015 - 1:45 PM   
     By:   PFK   (Member)

    Curiously, these samples hit more close to home for me than Lost Weekend, maybe because of the Koch suite I'm familiar with, maybe because I'm an outlier as far as the movie goes (I'm not much on Hollywood treatment of addiction, even when Billy Wilder tackles it). Whatever the reason, Desert Fury is an immediate buy, and LW is on the list but will have to wait a bit.

    This is MY kind of Rozsa!




    ALL Rozsa is MY kind of Rozsa! smile

     
     Posted:   Aug 7, 2015 - 2:54 PM   
     By:   Sean Nethery   (Member)

    Ok, you're right, me too. All Rozsa is my kind. But this one is REALLY my kind today!

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 7, 2015 - 4:40 PM   
     By:   cody1949   (Member)

    Curiously, these samples hit more close to home for me than Lost Weekend, maybe because of the Koch suite I'm familiar with, maybe because I'm an outlier as far as the movie goes (I'm not much on Hollywood treatment of addiction, even when Billy Wilder tackles it). Whatever the reason, Desert Fury is an immediate buy, and LW is on the list but will have to wait a bit.

    This is MY kind of Rozsa!




    ALL Rozsa is MY kind of Rozsa! smile


    I agree PFK. I will say this however, my unfamiliarity with this movie made this music seem totally new to me and so it was enjoyed even more. Not taking anything away from LOST WEEKEND , but I knew what to expect regarding that score.

     
     
     Posted:   Aug 11, 2015 - 3:31 AM   
     By:   MCurry29   (Member)

    Got my copy yesterday and listened twice last evening. An absolute wonder! Rosza is just so amazing!

     
     Posted:   Aug 14, 2015 - 8:48 AM   
     By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

    Just received this CD and it’s another fine example of 1940s style Rozsa. Initial impression is of a tense, varied, agitated score with the music in many cues striving for resolution, reflecting the inner turmoil of the main characters in the film. Some cues such as "Paula's Lock-Up Montage" provide more sustained development and then there's the thrilling climactic chase music.

    Great presentation by Intrada as always. Sound quality is remarkably good for the age of the recording. So good to know that Paramount preserved and discovered this, and other recordings of theirs of similar vintage.

     
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