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 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 3:36 AM   
 By:   facehugger   (Member)

Link--Not a bad score per se, but damn that synth sound drives me crazy.

Warlock is pretty weird too.

I guess I just hate that 80's synth sound of Goldsmith.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 3:44 AM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith once bowled a 48 during a league game at the Mar Vista bowling alley on Grandview and Venice. I'm pretty sure that that's his worst score.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 3:44 AM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith once bowled a 48 during a league game at the Mar Vista bowling alley on Grandview and Venice. I'm pretty sure that that's his worst score.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 3:50 AM   
 By:   Stephen Woolston   (Member)

Displeasure for that 1980's synth-dom period seems to be more of a shared experience than I thought.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:06 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I think the worse I have heard was the electronic cues in "Rent-a-Cop". the regular orchestral stuff, even the power anthem with some synth, was enjoyable.

That's the only bad one. The rest I didn't like, were just personal taste. I did not like "Executive Decision". At all. I went through many cues, trying to find good parts to maybe make a suite. I could not find a single good part.

I remember trying "Link" twice, briefly, and not liking it.

"Star Trek: Nemesis" was his worst Trek score, to me. I left the theater not remembering a note -- a first for a Trek film after theater viewing.

I did not enjoy most of his rejected score to "Timeline".

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:21 AM   
 By:   Spymaster   (Member)

Well it just goes to show... some excellent scores listed here!

And yes, Criminal Law and Mr Baseball both work fantastically in the films. Criminal Law is incredibly creative.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:26 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Yes, Jerry Goldsmith is the best movie music composer of all times!

One does not need to have superior intellect such as YOR to know that.



I'm not going to dignify a flawed premise with a considered opinion!

And in any case, there are no bests or worsts, only favourites and least favourites.

The Satan Bug is great.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:40 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Criminal Law is incredibly creative.

How?

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:43 AM   
 By:   spielboy   (Member)

I did not like "Executive Decision". At all. I went through many cues, trying to find good parts to maybe make a suite. I could not find a single good part.


www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaovwDqKC6E


Most of the comments I've read are highly subjective and IMHO most inane.

Ford A. Thaxton


unlike yours " CRIMINAL LAW and MR. BASEBALL work great for the these films and add much to them (I know I saw both of them)."

smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:45 AM   
 By:   Moonie   (Member)

NONE GOLDSMITH RULES

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 4:59 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

I'm not going to dignify a flawed premise with a considered opinion!


I don't think that this premise is flawed at all. Second only to Bernard Herrmann, I'm entirely sure, Goldsmith is the greatest -1 film composer of all time. No other composer has succeeded in such a myriad of different music styles - while always being recognizable as a composer within a few bars - and with such a distinguished body of scores (most of them pre-1983, I'd grant that). He was highly respected by his peers (Broughton said that Goldsmith's technique could "send you back to the drawing board"). But he did have a creative slump beginning with some 1982/83 scores (Psycho II is a low point), and the mid-1980s were a drag. That's not "taste-", that's quality-related. Many of the scores mentioned above are just lazy. Maybe they were some kind of outcry for better-quality pictures. There are isolated brilliant scores in this period, too, none more so than Legend.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 5:13 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

OK, Let's forget for the rest of this thread how the score sounds on CD APART from film it was composed for.

What score of Mr. Goldsmith's do you THINK didn't work in the film it was written for instead.

I will flat out say that the scores to CRIMINAL LAW and MR. BASEBALL work great for the these films and add much to them (I know I saw both of them).

If you want to go on how you hate the Synth scores he did in the late 80's and 90's, go ahead.

But can any of you point to a score that he did that just didn't work in the film it was commissioned for?

Ford A. Thaxton


1) I guess you missed the very first response in this thread, in which Marlene discusses the reasons why several of Goldsmith's scores don't work very well in their films (at least to his ears).

2) I'm . . . glad you know what you saw, I guess?

3) Who the hell cares if you say things flat out or simply say them without saying you're saying them?

4) I find it awfully amusing that you would dare accuse others of inanity. Yes, we all know that scores are meant to serve their films, and that how those scores will sound apart from the film is not a consideration. Yes, most of us will agree that Goldsmith was not only an excellent composer but also one who was very good at assessing what would work for a particular movie, or for the movie that a particular movie was trying to be (as was so often the case). But to identify one's least favorite Goldsmith score, in or out of the film, is not to dis the man himself. And good lord, but do you not realize that you're just as tediously obnoxious as yonythemoony when you come into a thread and start thundering from on high about how objectively good something is and how dare mere fans say otherwise?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 5:22 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I'm not going to dignify a flawed premise with a considered opinion!


I don't think that this premise is flawed at all. Second only to Bernard Herrmann, I'm entirely sure, Goldsmith is the greatest -1 film composer of all time.



Premise: Goldsmith is the best.
Me: No he isn't.
You: He's the second best.
Result: We agree that the premise is flawed.

Good day.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 5:56 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Premise: Goldsmith is the best.
Me: No he isn't.
You: He's the second best.
Result: We agree that the premise is flawed.


That's SOOOO not the result. wink

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

I'm not sure how useful I'm gonna be around here, as I like a lot of the scores being mentioned. Matter of fact, here's my order:

Alien Nation (seriously, this is incredibly underrated)
Warlock
Timeline
Bad Girls
Extreme Prejudice
Fierce Creatures
Gladiator
S*P*Y*S
Dennis the Menace
Link
I.Q.
Rent-a-Cop

Not a dud amongst them, in my view.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   OnlyGoodMusic   (Member)

Actually, your list spells D-U-D, with capital letters.

Besides, you just collected the "worst" scores mentioned above and listed them as good ones. Now, that's REALLY lazy.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Displeasure for that 1980's synth-dom period seems to be more of a shared experience than I thought.

Few things have aged as poorly as 80's electronic music. That's why the all (or mostly) 80's synth efforts of Goldsmith and Alan Silvestri are so unlistenable today. It was one thing when the synths were used merely as support to a primarily orchestral effort, like Under Fire or Legend or Twilight Zone: The Movie, but once Goldsmith started going primarily synth around '86 or so, his scores from that period are seriously diminished.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 6:53 AM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

Actually, your list spells D-U-D, with capital letters.

Besides, you just collected the "worst" scores mentioned above and listed them as good ones. Now, that's REALLY lazy.


So, bringing some positivity to a thread that engenders and celebrates negativity is "lazy"?

Thanks so much for clearing that up.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 6:55 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)

Six Degrees Of Seperation
S*P*Y*S
Denis The Menace

are the ones I can't listen to. May work well in the movies but just not my kind of music.

Just 3 out of 200+.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2013 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

With Ford's comments in mind, I go for RENT A COP as his "Worst" in my world. Then again, the film was definitely a worst for all involved, so perhaps it's Goldsmith's greatest score? (wink)

RUSSIA HOUSE is another work that loses me in the film, not on cd - it's a great jazz album from Goldsmith, but I don't think it really helps the film.

As to OMEN III "over-reaching;" that would be Mr. Goldsmith's nom-de-plum, as he is likely most famous for producing many scores vastly better than the movies they underscored, and those same scores helped lift those same movies up a notch.

Finally, not his worst scores at all, but his scores from the around '92 on always struck me as very repetitive, and - for the most part - not his best work (the rising repeated 4 note 'action' motive, the low bass 'villain/threat' motive, the 'synth trill' motive exactly the same in each score; this was something definitely not in his work prior - yes he has those crushed harmonies, minor chords, and pulsing rhythms in every score, but these all this said "Goldsmith!" and they were all orchestrated and presented in a different manner, so that when listening randomly, you quickly knew whether that was LOGAN'S RUN or PAPILLION or PATTON or OUTLAND; not so true in that late period where [but for the theme which also started to sound very similar film to film] you couldn't be sure just what film that cue is from...).

Was this change in sound due to the hear-say frustration with how TOTAL RECALL's score was buried in the mix, so "why bother?" His ailing health in that period? The influence of the Zimmer sound, which he went along with (Mr. Goldsmith certainly went with the flavour of the times throughout his career, he just tended to do that flavour better than anyone else)?

Not sure, but I sure miss that glorious Goldsmith sound/score from my coming of age period of 75-84. That material gets the most play in my world.big grin

 
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