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 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 8:49 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Of the hundreds of thousands of feature length films made worldwide over the past 80 years their have been thousands of songs[non musicals] which have been sung on the soundtracks of films, many during opening credits and many indeed very pretty.As many of you know in recent decades the songs will be sung during end credits more often then opening credits or in other parts of the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 9:09 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

BLOWING WILD (1953) - Frankie Laine

THE LIQUIDATOR (1966) - Shirley Bassey



I wonder how many of the western movie ballads Laine performed originally, which he very effectively lampooned later in "Blazing Saddles"?



BLOWING WILD wasn't a western, being set in South America during the 1930s. But Frankie Laine did sing the title songs for these westerns:

MAN WITHOUT A STAR (1955) - words and music by Arnold Hughes and Frederick Herbert

GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957) - music by Dimitri Tiomkin, lyrics by Ned Washington

3:10 TO YUMA (1957) - words and music by Ned Washington and George Duning

BULLWHIP (1958) - music and lyrics by Hal Hopper and James Griffith

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 9:11 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR ["The Windmills of Your Mind"] (1968) - Noel Harrison

A MAN CALLED DAGGER (1967) - Maureen Arthur

SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL (1964) - Fran Jeffries

WHAT'S NEW PUSSYCAT? (1965) - Tom Jones

VALLEY OF THE DOLLS (1967) - Dory Previn

TO SIR, WITH LOVE (1967) - Lulu

THREE BITES OF THE APPLE ["In The Garden - Under The Tree"] (1967) - David McCallum

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (1967) - Ray Charles

THE CINCINNATI KID (1965) - Ray Charles

BUONA SERA, MRS. CAMPBELL (1969) - Jimmy Roselli

I'LL TAKE SWEDEN (1965) - Frankie Avalon

PENELOPE (1966) - The Pennypipers

WHERE THE BOYS ARE (1960) - Connie Francis

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 9:59 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

As many of you know in recent decades the songs will be sung during end credits more often then opening credits or in other parts of the film.

And a sad state of affairs it is too. I really miss the opening main title sequence. So much so, that it almost brings tears to my eyes when a current movie opens with a really well-done credit sequence. Most recently, OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL and THE TO-DO LIST come to mind.
I really hate that most movies today open with just the title or worse yet, go right into the story after the studio logo with out even mentioning the name of the film.

Sorry, my rant got me off the topic of songs.

For my two cents, I also love the version of EL DORADO in the film. And the paintings behind the credits are pretty great too. It's too bad the soundtrack is a re-recording of mostly pop versions of the themes and the vocal is reduced to a fairly insipid choral version. Since it was never released on CD maybe there will be real soundtrack someday? I made a CDR from my LP and added the title song taken off the DVD.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 10:05 PM   
 By:   samloomis   (Member)

Two beautiful title songs from two Douglas Sirk movies:
"Written on the Wind" (Victor Young & Sammy Cahn) sung by The Four Aces; "Imitation of Life" (Sammy Fain & Paul Francis Webster) sung by Earl Grant.

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 10:18 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

BLOWING WILD (1953) - Frankie Laine

THE LIQUIDATOR (1966) - Shirley Bassey



I wonder how many of the western movie ballads Laine performed originally, which he very effectively lampooned later in "Blazing Saddles"?


Actually, I heard that Frankie Laine had no idea he was singing a parody song. That's why it works so well. Here's some info from imdb, although I have no idea if this is apocryphal or not. The source is Mel Brooks after all, who sometimes didn't let the truth get in the way of a good story.

"The film's title song "Blazing Saddles" was sung by popular fifties singer Frankie Laine. Brooks had taken out an ad in the show biz trade papers looking for "a Frankie Laine type." He was happily surprised when, two days later, Frankie Laine himself showed up in his casting office at Warner Brothers. Brooks hired Laine on the spot, but he never told him he was singing the title song of a comedy film, a parody. He was afraid that if he told Laine, he would lose the conviction in his singing voice. "

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 10:50 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

"The film's title song "Blazing Saddles" was sung by popular fifties singer Frankie Laine. Brooks had taken out an ad in the show biz trade papers looking for "a Frankie Laine type." He was happily surprised when, two days later, Frankie Laine himself showed up in his casting office at Warner Brothers. Brooks hired Laine on the spot, but he never told him he was singing the title song of a comedy film, a parody. He was afraid that if he told Laine, he would lose the conviction in his singing voice. "


To believe that fine tale, one would have to believe Laine didn't have an agent and was desperate enough for work to show up at a casting office unannounced in response to a newspaper ad, and that he was an absolute dunce who didn't have the wits to realize that the lyrics + Mel Brooks = comedy.
Anyway, the lyrics to his song "Bowie Knife" are funnier...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_bcGgInJ4E

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 11:20 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

To believe that fine tale, one would have to believe Laine didn't have an agent and was desperate enough for work to show up at a casting office unannounced in response to a newspaper ad, and that he was an absolute dunce who didn't have the wits to realize that the lyrics + Mel Brooks = comedy.

Indeed. And that Brooks thought Laine such an amateur that he wouldn't be able to belt the song out had he known its true purpose.

 
 Posted:   Aug 16, 2013 - 11:27 PM   
 By:   Sigerson Holmes   (Member)

The song is, of course, all the greater (and funnier) knowing that Laine is "playing it straight."

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 5:57 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

For my two cents, I also love the version of EL DORADO in the film. And the paintings behind the credits are pretty great too. It's too bad the soundtrack is a re-recording of mostly pop versions of the themes and the vocal is reduced to a fairly insipid choral version.

The LP choral studio version -- slowed down to last as long as the film's Main Title (about 2:25) -- omits the final one-third of the Main Title song! The LP is only 25 minutes long and Riddle didn't bother to record the whole song!! Aaargh! I hope that Paramount still has the George Alexander original in its vaults. Intrada?

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

does ole turkey buzzard count from mckenna?

wednesdays child from quiller?

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   George Komar   (Member)

Extraordinary that there's been no mention of 3:10 to Yuma, or Gunfight at the OK Corral yet.

Yes! What an extraordinary release a compilation of all these western Main Title ballads would make.

Of course, given clearance rights, it will never happen. The next best thing would be to have legitimate individual CD releases of the scores available, from which one could create one's own assembly.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Does this count?



"And the lady followed him..."

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

Here are a few more I've recalled.....

BAND OF ANGELS - chorus
SUMMER MAGIC - Dorothy McGuire (Marilyn Hooven)
THIS HAPPY FEELING - Debbie Reynolds
(It's a) WOMAN'S WORLD - The Four Aces
BECAUSE YOU'RE MINE - Mario Lanza
THESE THOUSAND HILLS - Randy Sparks
LOVER COME BACK - Doris Day
I'LL CRY TOMORROW - Susan Hayward
LET'S MAKE LOVE - Marilyn Monroe
RIVER OF NO RETURN - Tennessee Ernie Ford
THE TOAST OF NEW ORLEANS - Mario Lanza
YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT - The Four Aces
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY - Frank Sinatra
TEACHER'S PET - Doris Day
WILD IS THE WIND - Johnny Mathis
DIAMOND HEAD - James Darren
STRANGE LADY IN TOWN - Frankie Laine
SONG OF THE SOUTH - chorus
PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES - Doris Day
THE FRENCH LINE - chorus
SADDLE THE WIND - Julie London
DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES - chorus
SERENADE - Mario Lanza
LOVE ME TENDER - Elvis Presley
FOLLOW THE BOYS - Connie Francis
NOT AS A STRANGER - Frank Sinatra
DADDY LONG LEGS - chorus
LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME - Doris Day
ATHENA - chorus
GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH, THE - Betty Hutton
BERNARDINE - Pat Boone
ALICE IN WONDERLAND - chorus
GIDGET - James Darren
DEAR HEART - chorus
CHINA GATE - Nat King Cole
BUNDLE OF JOY - Eddie Fisher
SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME - Perry Como
PILLOW TALK - Doris Day
SEPARATE TABLES - Vic Damone
SEVEN HILLS OF ROME - Mario Lanza
SO THIS IS PARIS - chorus
BERNARDINE - Pat Boone
SUSAN SLEPT HERE - chorus
MARDI GRAS - Pat Boone
THE MATING GAME - Debbie Reynolds
SAY ONE FOR ME - Bing Crosby

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 6:01 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

HOME BEFORE DARK
RETURN TO PEYTON PLACE "The Wonderful Season of Love"
JOY IN THE MORNING
THE GREEN BERETS

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 7:47 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

For my two cents, I also love the version of EL DORADO in the film. And the paintings behind the credits are pretty great too. It's too bad the soundtrack is a re-recording of mostly pop versions of the themes and the vocal is reduced to a fairly insipid choral version.

The LP choral studio version -- slowed down to last as long as the film's Main Title (about 2:25) -- omits the final one-third of the Main Title song! The LP is only 25 minutes long and Riddle didn't bother to record the whole song!! Aaargh! I hope that Paramount still has the George Alexander original in its vaults. Intrada?


The rights to EL DORADO along with other unreleased great John Wayne scores, like MCCLINTOK!, are probably caught up in Batjac hell. There has been some movement since the death of Michael Wayne (I understand he was absolutely impossible to deal with regarding music and DVD rights), but there are still things that there has been no news about. Hopefully, someone is working with Batjac to remedy this.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2013 - 11:42 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The rights to EL DORADO along with other unreleased great John Wayne scores, like MCLINTOcK!, are probably caught up in Batjac hell.


As near as I can determine, Batjac had no involvement in EL DORADO. The film was solely produced and originally copyrighted by Laurel Productions, which was a Howard Hawks production company. When the copyright to the film was renewed in 1994, Paramount Pictures and Laurel Productions became co-claimants of the copyright.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2013 - 1:34 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Manderley, that would make a good CDR compilation!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2013 - 11:18 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

Manderley, that would make a good CDR compilation!!!


Add my two posts together and you've got a 2 or 3 CD set!!! smile

But you'll have to add a few more that others have also listed, to make it
most complete, and then be sure not to forget.....

DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER
RETURN TO PARADISE
WHERE LOVE HAS GONE
POCKETFUL OF MIRACLES
ANOTHER TIME, ANOTHER PLACE
BACHELOR IN PARADISE

(.....There are still probably 20-25 more we're forgetting.....)

 
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