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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: Force 10 From Navarone
 
 Posted:   Dec 9, 2011 - 12:20 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

As for that Navarone play set, I was eighteen and arriving home (parents' house, that is) from work late one night from work and seeing the box was set to be tossed out and I immediately rescued my cherished childhood toy from the garbage heap. When I moved out a few years later, I took the Navarone set with me...and as I already mentioned, I still have it.

Well you were luckier than me, I arrived home from work one night to find my entire collection of soldiers, forts, tanks, wagon trains etc. had gone, to a local children's home.

My mother had decided that now I was working for a living, I wouldn't need them any more.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 9, 2011 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Well Chris Jim, Tallguy etc,

Chris thats a horror story!! I think most lads have some memory of their parents throwing something out that they desperately wanted to keep but had to lose because of "space", or "your too old for that now" etc etc. Mine was garages. Had two and had to give up one! That was painful.

Jim, its still a real coup to have owned that model - forgetting the 'licence' of toy inaccuracy, its still brilliant. You were lucky to catch it.

Iam fortunate to still have about 18 big cardboard boxes in mums loft of airfix troops and tanks and half-bombed balsa buildings (all painted) - we used to recreate whole towns when I was a kid. All WW2 stuff (1:72 scale, the very small ones). Luckily mum has never moved and so has let me leave it up there. However, a big threat looms! These old folks get a grant for covering loft with about a foot of rock wool so Ive got to "have a sort out" between now and March when they come to do the job. Wish me luck I could be up there days! Heaven help me if I have to "open" one of the boxes! Once I start taking stuff out - could be some wargame re-enactments starting in the loft, which wont get the job done!! ha ha.


this will take you back... the iconic front covers are still the same as the ones we used to see in shops

http://www.airfix.com/


Oh and ..er... where eagles dare was our favourite LP to play during wargames.
That and Patton and Geoff Love War movie themes.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 9, 2011 - 1:01 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Quite right Bill, the models shown are 88's, the best anti tank/anti aircraft guns used in WW2.

I don't think two of those would have been much of a threat to the Royal Navy's destroyers.


Can you imagine, would have made quite a good comedy film? Out of the cliff pokes these two comparative peashooters compared to the naval guns on British Destroyers.
"Vait till zey ships come wivin range," says the german officer.
"But herr general, ze convoy haf gone past und ver not in range once"
"Again? Damn, I knew I should haf joined ze afrika korps!"

 
 Posted:   Dec 9, 2011 - 2:36 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

Bill,

One Christmas the family had a mix up over my Christmas/Birthday presents, on the day, I received two Self Propelled guns, what beauties, we'll send one back, says Mum, oh no I'll keep them both says I.

They were perfect for the Guns of Navarone, 24 inch base 12 inches high with a barrel of around 18 inches in length,. They fired four inch long shells for a distance of around 12 feet, and each gun had four shells they carried in the crew compartment.

I mounted them on my bed, and launched a combined naval (Airfix's Hood, Warspite and Nelson) and commando (Oxydol's Finest) assault, oh what fun it was, the only downside was, well I had to fire the guns (as in the film) the second shell hit the Nelson, removing her bridge, funnel and mast, not exactly what I meant to do, she needed some days in the Airfix dry dock while I tried to repair the damage.

I had those Self Propelled guns for years, wonderful toys, I don't suppose they'd be legal now.

Imagination is far better than computer games.

(Oxydol's Finest) were a set of WW2 British Commando's, you got two in each packet of soap powder, I managed to collect 60 of them, 1/32nd scale, superb figures, the only downside was, they always smelt of soap powder.

What memories, hope you manage to save some of your troops from the attic, Airfix 1/72, 2 bob (10 pence) got you 40 (approx) troops, who could ask for anything more.

 
 Posted:   Dec 9, 2011 - 4:34 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

This thread might not get any of the remaining 550+ copies of "Force 10", but it might inspire a sales spike of WWII models and toy soldier play sets!

As a kid, I would've loved to have had a poster of Ford and Shaw as they appear in the CD inlay tray! Such coolness! Nowadays, I guess the Barbara Bach bath scene will have to suffice, though a Robert McGinnis rendering wouldn't be half bad, either--even with the huge feet she'd no doubt have.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

If Joe Sikoryak's reading this (I'm sure he's not), what is the origin of the inlay tray photo featuring Shaw and Ford?

In the meantime, there's that "pesky" American flag again...I don't recall this being advertised on TV.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 11:39 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Jim, is that you in the picture in the advert?????

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

It looks even better from that angle.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

It looks even better from that angle.


They were perfect for the Guns of Navarone, 24 inch base 12 inches high with a barrel of around 18 inches in length,. They fired four inch long shells for a distance of around 12 feet, and each gun had four shells they carried in the crew compartment.



Im still trying to get my head around the potency for damage of the Chris Rimmer Guns of Navarone - probably would've destroyed half my model collection and half the bedroom!

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 2:13 PM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

It looks even better from that angle.


They were perfect for the Guns of Navarone, 24 inch base 12 inches high with a barrel of around 18 inches in length,. They fired four inch long shells for a distance of around 12 feet, and each gun had four shells they carried in the crew compartment.



Im still trying to get my head around the potency for damage of the Chris Rimmer Guns of Navarone - probably would've destroyed half my model collection and half the bedroom!


They were actually quite lethal. I don't think they'd ever be given a toy license these days. They were very impressive assault tanks. Wish I'd kept them, for my kids to play with. Sadly they did destroy half my model collection when a stray shell totally dis masted HMS Victory, Endeavour, Royal Sovereign and HMS Prince. They really made great toys in those days.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2011 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Jim, is that you in the picture in the advert?????

Heh. For that horror, go to the "Favorite Toys You Remember as a Kid" topic.

It would have been great having the "Force 10" music blasting away while young me waged toy soldier wars in the olde back yarde...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 12:18 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

They were actually quite lethal. I don't think they'd ever be given a toy license these days. They were very impressive assault tanks. Wish I'd kept them, for my kids to play with. Sadly they did destroy half my model collection when a stray shell totally dis masted HMS Victory, Endeavour, Royal Sovereign and HMS Prince. They really made great toys in those days.

I did have some die-cast metal field guns that had working mechanisms - they too fired a long way down the lounge. Were used very well for working where random artillery fire would really land on truck and tank convoys and such like.

People knocked such a hobby when I could turn the whole lounge into an entire town but it did mean that I had a very good appreciation of the second world war and various campaigns. Its a chunk of history that should be taught and known by everyone, not sneered at and swept under the carpet nor rewritten by the politically correct.

My Dad used to get the hump because we played Chase to the Airfield and Winter March over and over again!"!

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 12:45 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

I was having a WW2 day yesterday, Force Ten from Navarone followed by Kelly's Heroes and Bridge at Remagen, and I was thinking about the Clockwork Sherman Tank my dad bought me when I was eight (1960)

1/32 scale with a working Browning Machine gun in the hull, the turret moved automatically as the tank drove forward (it didn't do reverse, there was no retreating in the face of overwhelming odds) the gun fired every few seconds and blew out a huge cloud of smoke (baking powder in the barrel) the machine gun fired continuously with sparks spitting out of the barrel (it had a flint inside the hull)
and the Commander used to pop his head out of the turret every few seconds. Now that was my favourite toy for years, sadly when my Mum found the baking powder stains all over the Lounge carpet (Dad hadn't thought of that) the tank was banned to the tiled kitchen floor, it was easier to clean up the mess.

Those were the days, my friend.

http://www.vectis.co.uk/Page/ViewAuctionLots.aspx?AuctionId=342&DayNo=1&Section=4862

Scroll down this page to "Lot 12" and you'll see one, the Triang Sherman Tank.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 8:26 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Chris, that is brilliant!!

I had a division of about 20 Shermans in the small size (all handpainted when I shouldve been doing my homework!), but never anything as large and as all-singing all-dancing as that!

Imagine that now on your coffee table when freinds pop over!!!

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 8:36 AM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

Chris, that is brilliant!!

I had a division of about 20 Shermans in the small size (all handpainted when I shouldve been doing my homework!), but never anything as large and as all-singing all-dancing as that!

Imagine that now on your coffee table when freinds pop over!!!


Sad to say, it didn't survive the many wars it went through.

They really new how to make toys in those days, and how to write Film Scores.

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 5:43 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Here's another version of the set, marketed as the Iwo Jima play set. It looks to be green in color. Which score would you play to accompany that battle?

 
 Posted:   Dec 20, 2011 - 11:47 PM   
 By:   Chris Rimmer   (Member)

I'd probably listen to Jerry Goldsmith's "Patton", in fact I'm going to listen to it now.

Now if only I had the playset.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 12:22 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

hang on hang on, are we running up the beaches of Iwo Jima or scaling the cliffs of Navarone? Im confused.

And did they have rocks like that at Iwo Jima?

The Guns of Iwo Jima? Jerry could score that, no problem.

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

I would play Close Encounters if I had that score that reminds me of the potato mountain and how it most likely looks now if it were to exist all green and mouldy.

 
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