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 Posted:   Dec 28, 2010 - 10:09 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

There's even a creepy episode where a ventriloquist is semingly "controlled" by his puppet; shades of 1978's Magic, which starred Anthony Hopkins.


More likely shades of THE GREAT GABBO (1929) and DEAD OF NIGHT (1945)!

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 3:25 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

There's even a creepy episode where a ventriloquist is semingly "controlled" by his puppet; shades of 1978's Magic, which starred Anthony Hopkins.


More likely shades of THE GREAT GABBO (1929) and DEAD OF NIGHT (1945)!


Hey, I gotta try and connect to the raised-on-Lucas-Spielberg youth here! They don't know anything that happened before JAWS!

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 3:40 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

On with the episodes:

The Unwise Men- In the series' Christmas episode, aired Dec 24 1959, Jack Weston is a department store Santa Claus whose ex-con brother (Marc "I Didn't Know There was a Pool Down There" Lawrence) is planning a heist of Macy's (which is seen at night in all its glory) by using Weston as an inside accomplice. Johnny Staccato must, of course, stop them.

Bernstein adds snippets of Christmas carols--though never cheery--into his wistful score and we also get a fun, jazzy rendition of "Jingle Bells" from the band at Waldo's, the jazz club where Johnny hangs out. The episode is appropriate for the holiday season and though it's a crime drama, the happy ending has Cassavetes "breaking the fourth wall" and wishing the viewer--that's us!--a Merry Christmas! Hell, I don't think that Peter Gunn was even capabale of such joy...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 4:37 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

There's even a creepy episode where a ventriloquist is semingly "controlled" by his puppet; shades of 1978's Magic, which starred Anthony Hopkins.


More likely shades of THE GREAT GABBO (1929) and DEAD OF NIGHT (1945)!


Hey, I gotta try and connect to the raised-on-Lucas-Spielberg youth here! They don't know anything that happened before JAWS!


JAWS? What's that? Didn't film music start with PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN?

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

JAWS? What's that? Didn't film music start with PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN?

LOL You joke, but this is the same generation that threw 400 million dolars at Transformers 2 like it had a gun pointed at its collective head.

Okay, back on topic...

The Shop of the Four Winds- As mentioned before, Bernstein has a wonderful asian motif running through it. I don't think it appears on the LP, which is a shame. In the episode it is used in many different arrangements: a straight up instrumental, as source music in the Japanese restaurant, a vocal by the female guest star, a stop-and-start ("staccato"?) version during the fight and pursuit scenes, and finally as source music once again, with Cassavetes playing the tune on solo piano; it's a most beautiful theme.

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Ah, here's the episode Shop of the Four Winds, It won't allow embedding, but the links will take you directly to the cues:


first here's the vocal source rendition, as performed by Nobu McCarthy:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOESfFm8Ytg&feature=player_detailpage#t=361s

Followed by the "action" version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtAV4TlRfEQ&feature=player_detailpage#t=168s


Finally, there's the the piano version of the theme.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtAV4TlRfEQ&feature=player_detailpage#t=477s

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

Ah, here's the episode Shop of the Four Winds, It won't allow embedding, but the links will take you directly to the cues:


first here's the vocal source rendition, as performed by Nobu McCarthy:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOESfFm8Ytg&feature=player_detailpage#t=361s

Followed by the "action" version:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtAV4TlRfEQ&feature=player_detailpage#t=168s


Finally, there's the the piano version of the theme.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtAV4TlRfEQ&feature=player_detailpage#t=477s





Jim, love your enthusiasm for this, but it's actually a traditional Japanese melody, first used (I think) in an adaptation by Saul Chaplin for The Teahouse of the August Moon in the late 'fifties. Goldsmith made brief reference to it too in the Treaty-signing sequence in MacArthur.

Getting back to Staccato, have you checked out "Murder for Credit" yet, an episode with a bravura turn by Charles McGraw and a subdued appearance by Martin Landau. The background to this is a musical composition called 'Life' and it's a sort of concerto-like tune for piano. Great stuff.

- James MacMillan.

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2010 - 10:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I was wondering if it was a traditional melody, but it doesn't dampen my enthusiasm at all. smile Its use in the episode and its many variations are nothing short of brilliant. Interpolate away, baby! wink

I've watched the entire series a few times since getting the DVDs, though I'm familiar with the show from 2004 when TRIO aired it.

I like McGraw's introduction rap/speech/musical jam; it's quite different than the hardboiled characters I've seen him play. On a related note, Harry Guardino is delightfully over the top in his episode, "The Wild Reed."

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2010 - 4:44 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Getting back to Staccato, have you checked out "Murder for Credit" yet, an episode with a bravura turn by Charles McGraw and a subdued appearance by Martin Landau. The background to this is a musical composition called 'Life' and it's a sort of concerto-like tune for piano. Great stuff.

- James MacMillan.


Here's an excerpt from that piece. Looks like someone's uploaded the entire series, so those interested--*snicker*--should give STACCATO a try.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78PXuXj-9TQ&feature=player_detailpage#t=207s

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2010 - 2:48 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

"The way I got it figured, one of them wants to murder me dead!"



Great stuff. I'm really going to have to check this out I think smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2010 - 5:42 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"The way I got it figured, one of them wants to murder me dead!"

Great stuff. I'm really going to have to check this out I think smile


It's well worth the pittance it sells for, Simon. I realize that a lot here won't like it: it's Black & White, it's Mono, it's not by Lucas or Spielberg, no Goldsmith, etc. It's a very good show, even great at times. I don't think there was anything quite like it on TV in terms of content. Yes, there were numerous TV P.I.s, but none of those other programs were quite like Staccato. Cassavetes directed five or so episodes and they're among the series' best.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2010 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   davel   (Member)

Got the STACCATO DVD set for Christmas and I'm really looking forward to watching. I've had the vinyl soundtrack for years, though I haven't had a listen for a while. I was just a kid when shows like this were on TV and I remember having to beg to stay up and watch with my dad. The jazz soundtracks to these shows probably fostered my love of jazz and music in general.

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2011 - 5:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Got the STACCATO DVD set for Christmas and I'm really looking forward to watching. I've had the vinyl soundtrack for years, though I haven't had a listen for a while. I was just a kid when shows like this were on TV and I remember having to beg to stay up and watch with my dad. The jazz soundtracks to these shows probably fostered my love of jazz and music in general.

While jazz itself would never catch on with the unhip masses, the jazzlike scores of Bernstein and especially Mancini would; thank goodness for small miracles!

In my delusional world, there'll be a new generation of kids disgusted by their iphones, ipods, and computer games who will latch on to yesteryear's cool. Okay, maybe thirty or forty of them will...

 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2011 - 5:38 AM   
 By:   wayoutwest   (Member)

Thanks Jim never knew this was out on dvd it sounds like a very good show going to have to check it out myself at some stage.

Never enough time to listen to and watch everything I've picked up in the last few years have a bunch of stuff that needs some refining and others that need to be slung away never to return.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2011 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Has anyone heard the reissue CD of the Capitol album? I have a rip from vinyl but have not heard the actual CD. How is the sound?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2011 - 9:15 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

Has anyone heard the reissue CD of the Capitol album? I have a rip from vinyl but have not heard the actual CD. How is the sound?

Sounds absolutely fine to me. Pretty wide separation - saxes very clearly on the left and brass clearly on the right, piano in the centre etc. There might be a little tiny bit of distortion now and again but only noticeable through headphones.

I've got the vinyl album somewhere - as I recall, here in England it was released by 'That's Entertainment Records'. I was always a bit wary about their releases because to me the vinyl seemed to get annoyingly 'scratchy' quite easily.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 1, 2011 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Has anyone heard the reissue CD of the Capitol album? I have a rip from vinyl but have not heard the actual CD. How is the sound?

Sounds absolutely fine to me. Pretty wide separation - saxes very clearly on the left and brass clearly on the right, piano in the centre etc. There might be a little tiny bit of distortion now and again but only noticeable through headphones.

I've got the vinyl album somewhere - as I recall, here in England it was released by 'That's Entertainment Records'. I was always a bit wary about their releases because to me the vinyl seemed to get annoyingly 'scratchy' quite easily.


Thanks. I ask because Capitol mono LPs from that period are among the best sounding records ever made, but Capitol's stereo could be dodgy.

 
 Posted:   Jan 10, 2011 - 4:31 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Never seen the show I'm afraid but really enjoy this cd


I've definetely ordered this soundtrack (jazz? non jazz? half jazz? I just don't care)!
My edition contains Paris Swings too.

As a perfect travelmate I also ordered Faintly Reminiscent (2CD) by Jerry Fielding & His Orchestra.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 24, 2011 - 9:38 PM   
 By:   sdtom   (Member)

I enjoyed the Staccato tracks a lot more than the Paris Swings which were pretty dull standard arrangements. Previn played the piano but was hardly noticeable. Filler material only.
Thomas

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 25, 2011 - 12:30 AM   
 By:   Michael Barrett   (Member)

FWIW

http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/135402-detective-on-the-downbeat/

 
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