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 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 2:42 PM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

FUNNY FARM.

That is all.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 2:44 PM   
 By:   AndyDursin   (Member)

...okay, that's not all. lol.

If anyone wants to hear Elmer's JIMMY REARDON, this UK DVD has his score in the film. It's OOP now but might be lying around in places.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Night-Life-Jimmy-Reardon-DVD/dp/B00006RHUK/ref=sr_1_1?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1387406613&sr=1-1&keywords=jimmy+reardon

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 3:25 PM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

...okay, that's not all. lol.

If anyone wants to hear Elmer's JIMMY REARDON, this UK DVD has his score in the film. It's OOP now but might be lying around in places.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Night-Life-Jimmy-Reardon-DVD/dp/B00006RHUK/ref=sr_1_1?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1387406613&sr=1-1&keywords=jimmy+reardon



Ha! That same DVD I found a few years ago in Morrisons (a supermarket chain in the UK) for the price of £2.99

 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 4:50 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

"Casey's Shadow" (rejected score)

"Trust Me" (rejected score; Pray For Rain, replacement score)

"Murder In Mississippi" (rejected score)

"Innocent Blood" (rejected score)

One episode of "Gunsmoke" ("Hostage!")

LLLR's isn't doig "Ghostbusters"; I asked via e-mail about it.

I don't have a full composers listing for "Ripley's Believe It or Not", but of what I do have, just one episode by Bernstein. Hell -- there's isn't an episode listing online (or even episode names); I had to go by loose production numbers.
http://tvscoring.150m.com/Ripleys.html


"Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story" is an inaccurate listing. The director asked Elmer to score it, but he eventually found out Peter Bernstein would actually be handling most of the scoring, so he moved on to another composer.
http://rejectedfilmscores.150m.com/supposedlyrejected.html

 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)


There is quite a lot of music on the b**t beyond the 7 minutes on the Columbia soundtrack. Obviously the studio guys decided to substitute old blues and jazz pieces for most of Bernstein's composed tracks, but some of it did stay in the film. This is one of Bernstein's finest scores EVER, and how I would love to toss out the you-know-what in favor of a complete-as-recorded original tracks release. This may be the best one of the lot.


Dana, thanks for the details! Do you mind if I cut and paste your comments on this title into the main post, since you're so much more familiar with it? I welcome anyone else familiar with specific scores to post contributions here and let me know if I can add them to the main post...


For a small royalty...just kidding. Feel free to borrow. FYI, the unmentionable weighs in at a little past 56 minutes, with no songs. There are undoubtedly alternate cues on this, including 2 or 3 versions of an end title (one of which as I recall was actually used in the film).

Yavar, would you mind dropping me an email (see my profile)?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 6:04 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Merlin was never recorded, save for one song by me on Unsung Musicals II, sung by original cast member Michelle Nicastro.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 12:01 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

The Rainmaker -- the film was distributed by Paramount, who would presumably be dealt with for any additional music, but the almost 50 minute score album is on Hollywood Records (Disney-owned), so any expansion if necessary would have to be done by Intrada at this point.

I think that one was pretty complete.
A beautiful little americana score for a great movie.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 3:20 AM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

Merlin was never recorded, save for one song by me on Unsung Musicals II, sung by original cast member Michelle Nicastro.

Actually, Bruce, one other song from the show was recorded, by a young singer named Kristopher McDowell. "Something More" by Bernstein and Black can be found on his CD titled 'Faces of Love', released by Jerome Records (#4486) in 2001.

- James.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 4:29 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

How about Where's Jack 1969, I don't know if Paramount still have the music tapes, but there's the album, now owned by UMG, with the great Mary Hopkin singing the title song.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

Merlin was never recorded, save for one song by me on Unsung Musicals II, sung by original cast member Michelle Nicastro.

Actually, Bruce, one other song from the show was recorded, by a young singer named Kristopher McDowell. "Something More" by Bernstein and Black can be found on his CD titled 'Faces of Love', released by Jerome Records (#4486) in 2001.

- James.



I actually saw "Merlin," which was pretty excruciating as I recall. Essentially a vehicle for stage magician Doug Henning, as a follow-up to his previous show, "The Magic Show," a musical with score and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, "Merlin" was supposed to be more of a plot-driven enterprise, with Chita Rivera on hand, as a maniacal, evil sorceress, in full "Maleficent" mode. She was actually the only thing that brought a little life to the proceedings, constantly swooping on and off, swirling her extensive cloak. Henning, on the other hand, was a masterful magician, and his trick of "transferring" a white pony from one side of the stage to the other was amazing. But he was no actor, nor, particularly, a singer, which can be a drawback when he's the star of an expensive Broadway musical. He excelled at his magic acts, which were great, but all the rest was padding.

To be honest, I barely remember the music, though I do recall there was great usage of the instrument, the ondes martinot. (I understand Bernstein was involved with a lady who specialized in that instrument; hence its appearance in a number of his scores during that period...) In fact, I was so unimpressed by the score, that I have never even had any interest in further listenings, even though I've had ample opportunity to hear it, here and there.

Which was too bad, because I enjoyed Bernstein's previous Broadway score, for the musical, "How Now Dow Jones," which I actually saw no less than 3 times! I must have enjoyed it. Peppy score, with some lovely solos, it's been available on CD for years. Doesn't really sound like his film music, but more like a Jerry-Herman-ish sort of musical, in the mode of "Hello Dolly," but well worthwhile.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 9:41 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

Merlin was never recorded, save for one song by me on Unsung Musicals II, sung by original cast member Michelle Nicastro.

Actually, Bruce, one other song from the show was recorded, by a young singer named Kristopher McDowell. "Something More" by Bernstein and Black can be found on his CD titled 'Faces of Love', released by Jerome Records (#4486) in 2001.

- James.



I actually saw "Merlin," which was pretty excruciating as I recall. Essentially a vehicle for stage magician Doug Henning, as a follow-up to his previous show, "The Magic Show," a musical with score and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, "Merlin" was supposed to be more of a plot-driven enterprise, with Chita Rivera on hand, as a maniacal, evil sorceress, in full "Maleficent" mode. She was actually the only thing that brought a little life to the proceedings, constantly swooping on and off, swirling her extensive cloak. Henning, on the other hand, was a masterful magician, and his trick of "transferring" a white pony from one side of the stage to the other was amazing. But he was no actor, nor, particularly, a singer, which can be a drawback when he's the star of an expensive Broadway musical. He excelled at his magic acts, which were great, but all the rest was padding.

To be honest, I barely remember the music, though I do recall there was great usage of the instrument, the ondes martinot. (I understand Bernstein was involved with a lady who specialized in that instrument; hence its appearance in a number of his scores during that period...) In fact, I was so unimpressed by the score, that I have never even had any interest in further listenings, even though I've had ample opportunity to hear it, here and there.

Which was too bad, because I enjoyed Bernstein's previous Broadway score, for the musical, "How Now Dow Jones," which I actually saw no less than 3 times! I must have enjoyed it. Peppy score, with some lovely solos, it's been available on CD for years. Doesn't really sound like his film music, but more like a Jerry-Herman-ish sort of musical, in the mode of "Hello Dolly," but well worthwhile.


I'd heard the same thing so I never inquired until Bruce Kimmel put "Beyond My Wildest Dreams" on his Unsung Musicals II CD. Then I said to myself maybe I shouldn't trust the reactions of those who probably paid heavy money on an ill conceived musical and was arranged by longtime Elmer orchestrator David Spear who had lots of film music experience but none in musicals/Broadway.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 10:30 AM   
 By:   emusician   (Member)

West Side Story!

oh, wait...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 10:31 AM   
 By:   emusician   (Member)

West Side Story!

oh, wait...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 10:31 AM   
 By:   emusician   (Member)


 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

A Bernstein project left off the list is the 1995 TV documentary "A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies." This was produced by Miramax, and so probably now resides with Filmyard Holdings.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 11:12 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

One Day in Dallas -- from looking at the IMDb page this seems to have been a family affair, as the people involved in this short film mainly seem to have the last name Bernstein. Anyone have details?


ONE DAY IN DALLAS was a production of the Center for Advanced Film and Television Studies of the American Film Institute, and the rights are held by the AFI.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 12:09 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

MR. QUILP
considering this film is more than obscure and those who have seen it aren't that thrilled by it, Elmer's adaptation of Anthony Newley's songs plus background score seems to get nothing but praise:

"The musical director for the film is Elmer Bernstein, who provides excellent musical accompaniment."

"Elmer Bernstein's musical direction is more than adept."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 3:22 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

The Rising of the Moon, Taking the Wheel -- Bernstein is credited for the two short films at IMDb; since Bernstein certainly did his share of scoring short films over the course of his career, does anyone know anything about them? (ie. are they just tracking in The Great Escape or something?)


I believe that "Taking the Wheel" is original, since there are two pages of sketches for it in the Elmer Bernstein Collection at the U.S.C. Cinematic Arts Library. On the other hand, there is nothing in the Collection for "The Rising of the Moon."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Granada, Puppies for Sale -- two more shorts he's credited for at IMDb; anybody know anything about these?


U.S.C.'s Bernstein Collection has one page of sketches for "Puppies for Sale," but nothing for "Granada."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Dorothy Day -- Elmer wrote an unused score according to SoundtrackCollector (no mention on IMDb, which lists Bill Conti and someone named Ashley Irwin as composers). Does anyone know if anything was recorded (or even actually written)?


U.S.C,'s Bernstein Collection has no written score materials on "Dorothy Day" (AKA "Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story).

 
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