Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

As someone who has spent the better part of nearly two decades trying to explain to regular folk what I do for a living and the kind of music I work with I can honestly and sadly say the majority of people have no idea who any of these amazing composers are. That said, the only two names that folks do recognize on occasion are John Williams and Danny Elfman. The rest could be mistaken as names of their accountants or insurance agents.

MV


Danny gets heavy recognition from the Burton cult and the comic book crowd (actually that crowd knows quite a few composers) but nothing to compare with William's mainstream dominance. And I say this does not come solely from having his name on the top box office films for a number of years, but moreso from coming into our living rooms in America for 13 years with the Boston Pops. This is when the TV variety show dried up so if you wanted music that wasn't rock oriented you tuned in there for 13 YEARS.

BTW This only applies to America. Outside America I'd say Ennio Morricone has the equivalent status filling stadium's of 40 thousand seats! Causing the police to come with firehoses in Chile when seats sold out and he also has a history of being on television during his early days. Plus spaghetti westerns are a part of everyone's childhood. But in America, like the film, his name is truly nobody.



Oh yeah, I would add RAMBO to Jerry's recognizable themes.

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

What about "Rudy" and "Chinatown," both very distinctive and easy to remember? I'm sure that even if they don't know the composer, a broad range of movie lovers would recognize that music as coming from those 2 films. Can't watch the end of "Rudy" without crying my eyes out, although I found that when I listened to the isolated music score, it wasn't nearly as effective as when you hear the crowd screaming and the radio announcer talking about Rudy's struggle. Brings me very close to tears just writing about it now!

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

Goldsmith's "Star Trek" work definitely towers over everything else he's written in terms of public recognition, so much so that I sort of doubt that anything else he's done has come close to it in terms of people recognizing it. A large part of that is the fact that it was cross-generational: the theme was used in 1979, 1988, 1996, 1998, and 2002 on the big screen and 1987-1993 on the small, which is a wide enough net to catch the baby boomers, generation X, generation Y, and whatever kids today are called.

Anything else, no matter how popular it was at the time, is pretty generational. I have never seen an episode of The Waltons or the Man From UNCLE, for example, and I was born in the early 80s in America! That's not to say it's bad of course--I'm no Goldsmith cultist but everybody knows that he was never as successful as John Williams in getting his name to be a household word.

Apropos of what MV said, I would have to add Hans Zimmer to the list of composers people on the street know. I've had quite a few people mention his name to me when I bring up my film music collection; they are usually stunned that I don't have very many smile

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 10:44 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I would have to add Hans Zimmer to the list of composers people on the street know.


They might know his name but they don't know his music. Play any of the like-sounding present day scores, by any of a dozen current composers, and they'd guess it was Zimmer.
For 95% of it, I wouldn't know the difference either.

 
 Posted:   Nov 16, 2013 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   JohnnyG   (Member)

As someone who has spent the better part of nearly two decades trying to explain to regular folk what I do for a living and the kind of music I work with I can honestly and sadly say the majority of people have no idea who any of these amazing composers are. That said, the only two names that folks do recognize on occasion are John Williams and Danny Elfman. The rest could be mistaken as names of their accountants or insurance agents.

MV


Danny gets heavy recognition from the Burton cult and the comic book crowd (actually that crowd knows quite a few composers) but nothing to compare with William's mainstream dominance. And I say this does not come solely from having his name on the top box office films for a number of years, but moreso from coming into our living rooms in America for 13 years with the Boston Pops. This is when the TV variety show dried up so if you wanted music that wasn't rock oriented you tuned in there for 13 YEARS.

BTW This only applies to America. Outside America I'd say Ennio Morricone has the equivalent status filling stadium's of 40 thousand seats! Causing the police to come with firehoses in Chile when seats sold out and he also has a history of being on television during his early days. Plus spaghetti westerns are a part of everyone's childhood. But in America, like the film, his name is truly nobody.



Oh yeah, I would add RAMBO to Jerry's recognizable themes.



I wish it would be otherwise but yes, John Williams and Ennio Morricone are the two only names that the general public can recognize.

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.