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 Posted:   Aug 19, 2013 - 11:40 AM   
 By:   On the Score   (Member)

Hi All,

It's not often that the behind the scenes team of a new major score get to talk about their craft in in a cool retro theater for an event that's open to the general public. This Friday, the people who helped Ryan Amon craft his score for ELYSIUM will be at the Aero Theater in Santa Monica at 7:30 to do just that. Here's more info from the Cinematheque's site for what promises to be an ear-opening event that's of particular notice to fans who want to hear about the nuts and bolts process of assisting a composer in his first major gig, as well as those seeking their own careers in editing and orchestration.

********


Bringing The ELYSIUM Score To Life: Tips From The Team

An impressive score will elevate a film no matter what its budget. In this informative presentation, the team that brought composer Ryan Amon’s score for the new Matt Damon/Jodie Foster movie ELYSIUM to life will lecture about the score’s orchestration, conducting, music editing, recording and 5.1 mixing. The team will explain the efficient and reliable workflow used for producing the ELYSIUM score and show ways to scale these workflow and technological tricks to any budget of score production. Speakers from the ELYSIUM team include lead orchestrator Penka Kouneva, orchestrator/conductor Alain Mayrand, music editors Rich Walters and Dave Lawrence, and score recording/mixing engineer John Rodd. Net proceeds benefit Students Run L.A. (http://srla.org), a charity that helps at-risk students train and complete the L.A. Marathon.


http://www.americancinemathequecalendar.com/content/bringing-the-elysium-score-to-life-tips-from-the-team

 
 Posted:   Dec 18, 2013 - 11:13 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Daniel: Don't you just hate it when you post something and not one person bothers to leave a single word in response to it? After watching "Elysium" this afternoon, I decided to see if anyone had ever posted anything about its music (by Ryan Amon). And I came across yours. I felt the music was quite effective and it worked on my surround system. But my problem was that I grew weary of the movie itself and, frankly, was glad when it ended. Too many post apocalyptic sci-fi movies! At times I thought about "Oblivion," which DID work beautifully for me, mainly because it had a lot more heart. But I wish I had seen this 4 months ago!

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 12:33 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Despite liking the two directors' previous movies District 9 and Tron Legacy, I thought both Elysium and Oblivion were examples of how meager and basically dumbed down the sci-fi genre has become, ripping off about everything that was once novel in sci-fi and adding nothing original to it aside from a new look and cast. Story and 'ideas' (if any can be found) exist solely to support the visuals and action, I know that's standard blockbuster formula but for a sci-fi movie? The music for both movies to me felt equally derivative and not something I'd care to listen to outside of the movie.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 1:33 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Francis:

It only took a few seconds perusal of some of your favorite soundtracks:

Alien, Aliens, Alien³, Amazing Spiderman, Arlington Road, Beast of War, Breakdown, Carlito's Way, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Die Hard, Dolores Claiborne, Evil Dead (old and new), Event Horizon, Existenz, Ghostbusters, G.I. Joe Rise of Cobra, Hellraiser, Hollow Man, Inferno, It, Needful Things, Nightmare on Elm Street, Passion, Outbreak, Open Range, Pet Sematary, Phenomena, Poltergeist I & II, Predator 2, Prince of Darkness, Salem's Lot (old and new), Shawshank Redemption, Star Treks I, II, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, Suspiria, The Avengers, The Call, The Dark Half, The Dead Zone, The Fugitive, The Omen trilogy, The Ring, The Running Man, The Stand, The Thing, The Uninvited, Twin Peaks, Willow, Wolf, Wolfen, X-files, …

to show me that overall we have radical tastes in music -- I have both Alien and Aliens but almost never play them, especially James Horner's Aliens. I look at so many on your list, and even if I saw the movies, I didn't think much of their music. I did like and bought a few Star Treks, Omen 3 and Shawshank and even Willow, but there aren't many there that I would count as real favorites. So is it any wonder that you have no interest in "Oblivion"? If I were to tell you that I like it more each time I watch my Blu-ray of it and that it almost always brings me to tears at the end and that I like to say that it's sci-fi with a heart, you'd probably find that laughable. But then I look at some on your list and scratch my head and wonder how could you possibly count them as favorites? So it's all a very subjective matter of differing tastes, which should never be confused with whether such things are good or bad. If they work for you, then they're good for you, and if they don't, then they're not. And the same for me. Too often I see members here who are convinced that their's should be the defining taste when it comes to evaluating both movies and music. But I am forever seeing people buying what sounds to my ears like horrible music, and I know that what I buy would bore the hell out of THEM. (Some songs have such repetitious lyrics that I want to scream, and yet they sometimes get gold records for them!) So I shudder when I see words like "better" and "best" used when it comes to both movies and music, when it's more logical to label such things as favorites. Just because I hated "Tree of Life" doesn't mean that it's a horrible movie, just like someone may hate the painting "The Scream" while others are willing to spend $30,000,000 for it. Movies and music are arts, and we need to stop getting upset when others don't appreciate our favorites or have favorites that WE can't stand. Vivre la difference!

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Ron, I didn't use the words "bad" or "good" or "better" or "best"... I called the scores 'derivative' because like their movies I found little original about them. That's not a subjective comment, that is an objective comment (that's still open for debate). My reason why I call it derivative is because for instance Oblivion's score was partly done by Trapaneze who worked with Daft Punk on Tron Legacy and later redid their music for the series, but take Daft Punk out of the equation and what you end up with is basically remixes of the same concept IMO. You can like his combo with M82 on Oblivion, but I found it a second rate Tron legacy (which I enjoy a lot) with too many Zimmer'isms. Been there, done that, much like is the case with Oblivion the movie which felt like a best-of sci fi patchwork at best. I fault these moviemakers for not trying harder.

I'm not here to convince you mine is the defining taste, I'm just discussing the scores and movies. And how dare you call me out on my favorites list! wink which is incomplete by the way, Tron Legacy should be on it. I have broader interests than what is on there. smile

P.S. shawshank and others on that list bring me to tears so we can exchange handkerchiefs wink

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 5:43 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Taste is entirely subjective, but that doesn't mean that all entertainment is created equal. Some movies/music/anything are superior to others. That doesn't mean it's wrong to like them, and that doesn't make it right to disparage others for liking them, but some creators are simply more talented craftspeople than others, and sometimes greatness comes together almost (or almost entirely!) by accident, but whatever the case, some movies are better than others. It's not all just taste. Taste exists in a context.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 7:52 AM   
 By:   On the Score   (Member)

Daniel: Don't you just hate it when you post something and not one person bothers to leave a single word in response to it? After watching "Elysium" this afternoon, I decided to see if anyone had ever posted anything about its music (by Ryan Amon). And I came across yours. I felt the music was quite effective and it worked on my surround system. But my problem was that I grew weary of the movie itself and, frankly, was glad when it ended. Too many post apocalyptic sci-fi movies! At times I thought about "Oblivion," which DID work beautifully for me, mainly because it had a lot more heart. But I wish I had seen this 4 months ago!

Like the liner notes I do, I have no idea who reads my stuff and who doesn't. I send it off into the wilderness, and hope for the best smile But I'm so glad you read, and respond, and I welcome back your intelligent thoughts, even if I disagree with them in this case! Best to you, and keep on offering your opinions to my interviews and reviews.

DS

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   jwb   (Member)

I did not enjoy ELYSIUM. The film or the score. The score is just as unmemorable as the film is.

There is no reason given why in the film there is such a separation and distaste between the people on Earth and ELYSIUM. And they only focus on one small village/town on Earth. Sure, the film's trailer said it was a class thing, but that is not even stated in the film really. Nothing is communicated on how things became the way they were. That would require too much thought, I guess. Foster is totally under-utilized and is killed off like she meant nothing. She is introduced first as the villain and then it switches to a lifeless and stereotypical bad guy with no motivation.

The main problem with this film is.. believability, and I'm not talking about the gadgets and spaceships, etc. That no matter what is suspension of disbelief. The real problem is there is no way this would happen in real life where some people are granted, essentially eternal youth, healing, prolong of life, etc. And others are left to suffer.

I'm really getting tired of "dystopian" stories. It's a shame more filmmakers today only want to in vision the worst of the human race.

 
 Posted:   Dec 19, 2013 - 8:22 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

There is no reason given why in the film there is such a separation and distaste between the people on Earth and ELYSIUM. And they only focus on one small village/town on Earth. Sure, the film's trailer said it was a class thing, but that is not even stated in the film really.

L.A. is a small town? And class issues weren't stated? They was all over the screen. Earth is basically a slum, even current major cities reduced to favelas. The rich elite live off and over the poor with whom they like to pretend they are not associated. The poor aspire to basic dignified work conditions and access to healthcare. Undocumented immigrants to Elysium are extrajudicially killed or at best summarily deported. This whole movie is a mess, but it's very clearly critiquing, among other things, the (largely class-based) structural violence inherent in certain modes of production and government. Sorry to get obscure, I don't want to get into a conversation that'll get this thread locked!

 
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